8 months in, 11% of Android devices run 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich

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  • Reply 61 of 115
    fuwafuwafuwafuwa Posts: 163member


    In android, the impovement over previous version is mere version number ????. That's why many don't bother to upgrade, and most of the devices that have newest version installed are new devices????. Or we can say, the common practise to upgrade android is buying new device????.

  • Reply 62 of 115
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    It's interesting how those that care about Android OS and device diversity don't seem to have the same consideration when it comes to their gene pool. ????
  • Reply 63 of 115
    This is why my two year android experiment is over...well, as soon as next iPhone is released, but I will be off evo 4g contract in one week. An unmitigated disaster when you buy the latest and greatest phone, but they won't upgrade past 2.3.5 and the rest of the android nation is working on 4.0 or so. I find it hard to call this an open ecosystem when I can't even get the same software version as the rest of the android users...nothing but an obvious marketing ploy to attempt and force me to buy a new phone every two years to stay current. At least iOS stays relevant over multi releases going back years and you aren't forced to buy a new iPhone every two years to stay current.
  • Reply 64 of 115
    ericthehalfbeeericthehalfbee Posts: 4,093member


    Shidell, I suggest you go here....


     


    https://developer.apple.com/library/ios/navigation/


     


    Your previous statement that 95% of API calls will work is highly misleading. The bottom line is many API calls are basic OS level stuff that would apply to any version, so of course most of them will be the same. The problem is that the really useful "new" API's aren't supported on older devices in Android. And these are the ones that users will notice, not the umpteen low-level calls to do things like manage memory and data (for example).


     


    You are correct in stating that both iOS and Android have fragmentation. But your attempts to somehow imply they are similar or that Android fragmentation isn't an issue are way off base. iOS is nothing like Android in this regard.

  • Reply 65 of 115
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 1,999member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Shidell View Post


     


    Does iOS let you build an application that uses iOS 6 features (APIs), but can still run on an iOS 4 device and simply allow you to not implement those features on said older devices?



     


    Sure it does, but why would I bother? The iOS user base moves forward so quickly, there's no reason to support an older version. Why make things difficult for myself when I don't need to?


     


    Do you know how many iOS devices are running version 5.x?   >80%     and it only took one week to hit >30%


     


    And I know every new device being sold today will have iOS 5.x installed. So if Apple sells 50 million more devices this quarter; potentially 25 million more customers (Apple has stated the new customer ratio is about 50%).


     


    This is where Android's issue of fragmentation comes into play, because not every Android device sold is running the latest OS, so as a developer I'm kinda forced to support multiple versions or just pick the version that's the least common denominator and not worry about any new stuff.

  • Reply 66 of 115
    ericthehalfbeeericthehalfbee Posts: 4,093member


    edit: double post

  • Reply 67 of 115
    ahmlcoahmlco Posts: 432member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Shidell View Post


    Google Play is the only way Google can form any sort of metric on Android.



     


    Right. Because no one on an Android phone ever does a Google web search or uses Gmail or Google Maps...


     


    As such, this metric was chosen specifically to bias their results.

  • Reply 68 of 115
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 1,999member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Shaun, UK View Post


     


    Why should they worry about upgrades. Most Windows users don't upgrade their OS - they just stick with the OS that came on their computer. They only upgrade when they buy a new computer.


     


    Nobody cares.



     


    You're right! They just don't care. They just bought a phone, not an Android phone, but a mobile phone that happened to have Android installed on it. This is why Android as a platform is doomed. They'll take a massive amount of market share, especially on the low end, but it won't matter, because no one really cares. (Except Android enthusiasts, who will continue to use this sole statistic to prove that Android is better and winning.)

  • Reply 69 of 115
    rabbit_coachrabbit_coach Posts: 1,114member
    ahmlco wrote: »
    Right. Because no one on an Android phone ever does a Google web search or uses Gmail or Google Maps...

    As such, this metric was chosen specifically to bias their results.
    I think you are asking for to much here ! ;-)
  • Reply 70 of 115


    As a current iPhone user who came from Android, I hate bogus articles like this showing lazy reporting because it's a blog for stupid fanboys.


     


    Android jellybean far surpasses iOS5 and iOS6 when used on a device without bloatware and skins. ie. a Nexus device.


     


    If you want to debate Android software vs. iOS software, then do that. Don't make stupid claims that one is better than the other because it's on more handsets. That's like saying you wouldn't buy a Lexus because you don't like Scions. Compare iOS5 with Gingerbread on a Nexus device because that's where they are about equal in terms of innovation. Jellybean is so far beyond anything iOS is doing it's ridiculous. They are pushing boundaries and ACTUALLY INNOVATING. Sure, sometimes these innovations don't always work perfect 100% of the time, but if don't like it, please remove Siri from your phone and then I'll listen to you.


     


    If you want to talk about the companies ethos and their differences, fine, but leave the software out of it. If I choose to buy $30 Levi's vs. their $150 Levi's, then I know I will be getting a slightly lesser quality of jean, and I am ok with that as are most people who can't afford a jean priced that high.

  • Reply 71 of 115
    hirohiro Posts: 2,663member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by itsjustaphone View Post




    "It's kinda sad that these guys feel the need to join an Apple centric forum to spout their drivel in support of a platform they know know in their hearts is subpar. The insecurity complexes must be strong indeed."


     


     


     


     


    What a pompous ass*&%$ to come up with a remark such as this. Ikrup, You are the unfortunate epidemy of an apple user as highlighted in any NON-apple forum. 


     


    I happen to own both devices. One for work, and one for play. I play on my iphone, and I work on my android. Then again I am also a pc user... The android plugs right in, acts as a 20+ gig external hd (great for solidworks btw) and has a function to play my adobe flash demo videos.


     


    I could care less when it comes to updating my phones OS. If I can jump on gmail, cruise the interweb, and call pizza hut... I am one happy camper!



    I think its sad somebody had to create an account just to argue with this.  At least they could have been stand up and used their existing account rather than make another new sock puppet to avoid getting another account banned.

  • Reply 72 of 115
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    Jellybean is so far beyond anything iOS is doing it's ridiculous. They are pushing boundaries and ACTUALLY INNOVATING.

    Oh look. It's… oh, wait, I have images.

    349
    If I choose to buy $30 Levi's vs. their $150 Levi's, then I know I will be getting a slightly lesser quality of jean, and I am ok with that as are most people who can't afford a jean priced that high.

    Except the $30 jean doesn't have pockets and can't get pockets sewn on later at all. The $150 jean comes with pockets and will also be updated with zippers, buttons, and more pockets for free.
  • Reply 73 of 115
    rabbit_coachrabbit_coach Posts: 1,114member
    As a current iPhone user who came from Android, I hate bogus articles like this showing lazy reporting because it's a blog for stupid fanboys.

    Android jellybean far surpasses iOS5 and iOS6 when used on a device without bloatware and skins. ie. a Nexus device.

    If you want to debate Android software vs. iOS software, then do that. Don't make stupid claims that one is better than the other because it's on more handsets. That's like saying you wouldn't buy a Lexus because you don't like Scions. Compare iOS5 with Gingerbread on a Nexus device because that's where they are about equal in terms of innovation. Jellybean is so far beyond anything iOS is doing it's ridiculous. They are pushing boundaries and ACTUALLY INNOVATING. Sure, sometimes these innovations don't always work perfect 100% of the time, but if don't like it, please remove Siri from your phone and then I'll listen to you.

    If you want to talk about the companies ethos and their differences, fine, but leave the software out of it. If I choose to buy $30 Levi's vs. their $150 Levi's, then I know I will be getting a slightly lesser quality of jean, and I am ok with that as are most people who can't afford a jean priced that high.
    I hate Jellybean! :-p

    I wait and see what Friedpotato brings.
  • Reply 74 of 115
    krabbelenkrabbelen Posts: 243member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Shidell View Post


     


    I do hope you understand what fragmentation is. Please read my above post on APIs.


     


    If you do understand what fragmentation is, then you understand that despite many iOS devices having iOS 6 (or 5, or anything), they're still fragmented. An iPhone 3GS is not capable of Siri, cannot Navigate, etc. That too is fragmentation.


     


    You're correct that Google has no financial incentive to update older devices. For that matter, Google makes little on Android itself. Android helps Google improve their search business by providing a mobile platform that consumes their services and helps drive and improve searching and marketing. That falls the manufacturers and carriers, who do (and do not) provide updates for various reasons. High-end models typically receive updates, mid-range and low-end phones may get one (or none).


     


    It is important to realize that if Apple makes iOS 6 available to an iPhone 3GS but removes most of what makes it "iOS 6", then it's really just a marketing gimmick. In that way, the phone might as well still have iOS 5--and that's basically like an Android device not receiving an update.



    Except that iOS (and Mac OS updates for that matter) are improvements across the board. They do add new features to all devices, speed them up and generally make them more usable. (for example, I have a G4 PowerMac that is about 10 or 11 years old and it runs better than ever on 10.6 Leopard). Therefore, it isn't just a marketing gimmick (and the one or two highlighted features that are restricted to newer hardware are clearly laid out in the keynote or announcement).


     


    Apple computer and devices are very usable for several years, and hold their resale value very well, precisely because they are easily upgradeable to the next two or three major versions of the OS. And there are usually hundreds of improvements, and the code generally gets leaner and faster, with newer implementations and better approaches to many core services and features. There is no doubt that the upgrades extend the life and performance of the older devices; and there is no doubt that this contributes to the high satisfaction rates given by Apple customers.


     


    Of course, a few highlighted features from the keynote are only supported on later hardware. That goes with the territory. You may even call that a type "fragmentation". But for you to equate that with the Fragmentation on the Android platform is highly disingenuous.


     


    For one thing, ALL iPhones and iPads and iPod touches ship with the latest version of iOS. The real nub here is that NEW Android devices are still shipping with version 2.3, etc. Not only that, but no-one -- not Google, not the OEM, not the Carrier -- is giving a definitive answer about what device will ever receive what upgrade and how and when. (Contrast this with simply pressing the upgrade button on your iOS device the day the new version is released, for devices up to about three years old for a guaranteed improvement). For you to blow this off as nothing and try and paint iOS in the same fragmentation mess as Android is laughable. By all accounts, each new release of Android will NEVER have a significant share of Android devices.


     


    I have heard arguments like yours form the Android camp numerous times, and it basically comes down to what you implied: no-one really cares if their Android device is up-to-date with the latest version (or even two versions back) because the api's are the same, and the only real new features anyway have to do with new hardware features so you have to get a new phone anyway (which isn't likely to have the latest version either, but hey). A few of the pro-Android comments on this thread are acting like fragmentation is a "Feature". ...maybe Google really is more like MS than we thought.


     


    So, what is Google doing from version to version? Are there any real improvements, or not? Is it just a case of a couple new, high-profile things that relate to new hardware? Or, is Google simply stuck with developing to the lowest common denominator, just like its developers?

  • Reply 75 of 115
    jragostajragosta Posts: 10,473member
    shidell wrote: »
    Google isn't in debt over Android? Android is profitable for Google, but not in a "boatloads of cash on every device!" sort of way.

    The last estimate I saw is that Google makes about $15 per Android device per year (in advertisements based on search), which is how and why Android is good for them. I think the figure I saw was around ~4 billion/year based on Android devices.

    No one knows. First, that number is only a wild-assed guess. More importantly, you don't have any idea how much money Google spent on Android and no one here does, either. You'd have to count any purchases of companies for Android's benefit, add in some percentage of the Motorola acquisition (but determining what percentage was for the business, what percent for the tax losses, and what percent was for Android and patent portfolio would be impossible). You also have to subtract any development and support costs, including all the legal expenses.

    Finally, you should factor in opportunity cost. Since reports say that Google's ad revenue on iPhones is greater than on Android phones, every customer who buys an Android phone instead of an iPhone costs Google money.

    In the end, no one knows for sure, but I don't think anyone is estimating that it has been a significant money maker after costs are deducted.
    ahmlco wrote: »
    Right. Because no one on an Android phone ever does a Google web search or uses Gmail or Google Maps...

    As such, this metric was chosen specifically to bias their results.

    Of course it was. There are plenty of ways they could have measured the relative percentages:

    1. Web hits (still not perfect, but better than Google Play numbers).
    2. Google search hits.
    3. A survey.
    4. Reporting the number of phones sold with each OS and then the number of upgrades sent by carriers
    As a current iPhone user who came from Android, I hate bogus articles like this showing lazy reporting because it's a blog for stupid fanboys.

    Android jellybean far surpasses iOS5 and iOS6 when used on a device without bloatware and skins. ie. a Nexus device.

    If you want to debate Android software vs. iOS software, then do that. Don't make stupid claims that one is better than the other because it's on more handsets. That's like saying you wouldn't buy a Lexus because you don't like Scions. Compare iOS5 with Gingerbread on a Nexus device because that's where they are about equal in terms of innovation. Jellybean is so far beyond anything iOS is doing it's ridiculous. They are pushing boundaries and ACTUALLY INNOVATING. Sure, sometimes these innovations don't always work perfect 100% of the time, but if don't like it, please remove Siri from your phone and then I'll listen to you.

    If you want to talk about the companies ethos and their differences, fine, but leave the software out of it. If I choose to buy $30 Levi's vs. their $150 Levi's, then I know I will be getting a slightly lesser quality of jean, and I am ok with that as are most people who can't afford a jean priced that high.

    OK, then please tell us how Jelly Bean "far surpasses" iOS. Be specific and use facts, not your usual Apple-hating swill.
  • Reply 76 of 115
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 1,999member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by bilboteabagins View Post


    As a current iPhone user who came from Android, I hate bogus articles like this showing lazy reporting because it's a blog for stupid fanboys.


     


    Android jellybean far surpasses iOS5 and iOS6 when used on a device without bloatware and skins. ie. a Nexus device.


     


    If you want to debate Android software vs. iOS software, then do that. Don't make stupid claims that one is better than the other because it's on more handsets. That's like saying you wouldn't buy a Lexus because you don't like Scions. Compare iOS5 with Gingerbread on a Nexus device because that's where they are about equal in terms of innovation. Jellybean is so far beyond anything iOS is doing it's ridiculous. They are pushing boundaries and ACTUALLY INNOVATING. Sure, sometimes these innovations don't always work perfect 100% of the time, but if don't like it, please remove Siri from your phone and then I'll listen to you.


     


    If you want to talk about the companies ethos and their differences, fine, but leave the software out of it. If I choose to buy $30 Levi's vs. their $150 Levi's, then I know I will be getting a slightly lesser quality of jean, and I am ok with that as are most people who can't afford a jean priced that high.



     


    Did you not read the article? It had nothing to do with which OS was inherently better than the other. It's about how difficult it is for the user base to adopt the latest version of Android.


     


    And speaking of being a stupid fanboy... How exactly is Jellybean pushing boundaries and innovating? Saying it does without examples makes you nothing more than a fandroid troll.


     


    And furthermore, if you go to "Settings -> General -> Siri"  there's an on/off switch.

  • Reply 77 of 115
    apple ][apple ][ Posts: 8,691member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by tcoates View Post




    Fascinating! I didn't realize being an Apple elitist gave you divine insight into the hearts and minds of others.



    I have a pretty good insight into the rather primitive behavioral patterns of Fandroids, as I have had the unfortunate experience of running into some of them more often than I'd wish. 


     


    The psychological motives of trolls who choose to visit forums that they don't like are motivated primarily by hate and ignorance and it's a pretty good bet that the majority of these people suffer from various mental disorders. More people suffer from mental disorders than ever before. There is sufficient evidence and studies to back that up.


     


    I've said this in the past, but I can't stand Android at all. I think that it's a truly horrible OS, made for amateurs and poor people. But, you'll never see me signing up to an Android forum. Why in the world would I want to do that? 

  • Reply 78 of 115

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by tcoates View Post




    Fascinating! I didn't realize being an Apple elitist gave you divine insight into the hearts and minds of others.



    Being an Apple elitist alone doesn't give one divine insight into hearts and minds, it merely shows the obvious superiority over android/google dorks

  • Reply 79 of 115
    markbyrnmarkbyrn Posts: 610member
    Guess the vast majority of Androids won't be getting their Project Butter & Jelly Bean but come on, it's not that bad - be happy with your Gingerbread.


    [URL=http://forums.appleinsider.com/image/id/170468/width/211/height/239][IMG]http://forums.appleinsider.com/image/id/170468/width/211/height/239[/IMG][/URL]
  • Reply 80 of 115
    bregaladbregalad Posts: 816member


    The Android situation is more complex than Google wants to admit.


     


    Today I could go online and order a device running Android Jelly Bean. I could also choose a device running Ice Cream Sandwich or Gingerbread or even Froyo. Yes there are still "brand new" phones in your local Best Buy and cell phone provider running Android 2.2.


     


    Remember what kind of message Google is trying to send. Today they're emphasizing users who regularly visit Google Play because that's the group that media companies and app developers care about.


     


    Tomorrow when Google claims a majority of smart phones are shipping with Android remember that number includes millions of people who don't visit Google Play often enough to be counted and people who don't even have a data plan, but have an Android phone because that's what they were convinced to get.

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