FBI issues warning to smartphone users regarding Android malware

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Comments

  • Reply 61 of 104

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Jivanile View Post



    Who cares if someone can steal my information so easy, it has sd card expansion slots, removable batteries, widgets, and you can swipe your palm to take a screenshot. Malware Shmalware.


    LolZ~!!!!!!!!


     


     


    So glad Apple is cutting the head off of the snake!  Google Maps app, YouTube (Lolz - The Google version is soooo hideously baddddddah) and the further expansion of search... I say ban everything Google.....

  • Reply 62 of 104

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Neo42 View Post


     


    There's no need for such panic.  Generally anyone sporting some type of consciousness will avoid malicious software on an Android device.  There are plenty of wealthy people use Android devices.  Sure there are more 'poor' people with cheaper Android phones... because Apple has chosen not to offer something that fits their budget.  Someone who thinks they are "rich" and "better" than other people because they worship Apple wouldn't understand any of this.



     


    Dude, BOTTOM LINE ---  When has there EVER been an ad advertising a SALE on an IPHONE just weeks or months after it's release?  Two for one specials is Google's and Samdung's best way to steal market share, something apparently Wall Street Cheaters miss...... Cricket, cricket...


     


    This sunday, Best Buy had thar Samdung SIII for $100 off with contract....A full page Ad no less. Gee they must be flying off the shelves for such a need to MARK THEM DOWN so dang soon.  Gimme a break. 


     


    Hey Samdung --  your "clever, funny ad campaign" not working?????!!!!

  • Reply 63 of 104
    analogjack wrote: »
    derek, mon pauvre, this is just the beginning. 

    Hardly. This isn't the first baseless, hysterical Android malware hit piece I've seen, and it won't be the last. Every few weeks we see some new inflated claim from a security consultancy that Android malware increased dramatically. But if you look closely, you'll see they almost never disclose their methodology, which makes it hard to take them seriously. Also, it appears that many of them curiously classify adware as malware, leading to inflated numbers. In most cases, these companies are trying to scare Android users into buying their anti-virus products, which are snakeoil.

    Further, when pressed, these companies admit their data is overhyped and that most malware comes from apps outside the Google Play Store. Quoting from McAfee's Q1 2012 report:
    "The great majority of mobile attacks, and their malware, stem from and attack third-party markets,
    particularly in China and Russia. In most cases, we do not find this malware in the official Android
    market. Google’s app store has suffered from some incidents, but so far those counts are moderate.
    McAfee Labs advises customers to use install software only from the official market. That step should
    greatly reduce the risk of compromising your Android device."

    And it's worth repeating that third-party app stores are blocked by default. Users have to go into their security settings and click through this dialog to enable them:

    400

    You'd think that at some point people would start looking at the actual data instead of the hype. I'm still waiting for that to happen. To be clear, I'm not suggesting that Android is flawless; no OS is. And there are areas where one can make legitimate, data-driven criticisms of Android security. But these malware scare pieces aren't among them.

    It's also worth asking -- why does Apple Insider continue to run these anti-Android hit pieces? I don't see this sort of platform bashing on other tech news sites. Android Central doesn't run stories trashing iOS; WMPowerUser doesn't feel the need to bash Android, etc. But I see quite a bit of this hit pseudo-journalism on Apple-related sites.
  • Reply 64 of 104


    New Samsung ad.


     


    Open on the usual gang of Apple hipster stereotypes standing around in the neverending line-up outside the Apple store.


     


    Barista #1: "Hey, I hear this year, they're giving us all the cool features we didn't get last year."


     


    Barista #2: "I hope so, but all that matters is the Apple logo on the back."


     


    Barista #3: "No kidding!"


     


    Two unfathomably awesome guys stand nearby and tap their phones together. 


     


    Barista #2: "Whoa! What are those awesome sci-fi gadgets?!"


     


    Awesome Guy #1: "It's the Samsung Galaxy SIII with all the cool features you're still waiting for. We just traded playlists."


     


    Awesome Guy #2: "Um, dude my phone is rebooting."


     


    Awesome Guy #1: "Huh? Oh, so is mine."


     


    Awesome Guy #2: "Now it's not coming back up. Oh &#$%! This is bad. What did you do to my phone?!"


     


    Awesome Guy #1: "Don't blame me, you jerk! I'm running anti-virus software!"


     


    Barista #1: "Trade playlists! I hope we can do that next year."


     


    Barista #2: "Well, maybe not."
  • Reply 65 of 104
    hill60hill60 Posts: 6,992member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by derekmorr View Post



    Of course, no where in this article or any of its sources does it claim that this is an issue for apps in the Play Store. Most malware is found in shady, third-party stores.

    Further, Dilger's claim that "FinFisher is installed by simply visiting a Web link or opening a text message that disguises itself as a system update" is misleading. Android devices block third-party app stores by default. Unless a user has gone into their security settings, they don't be able to install an app that they download from an arbitrary web page. (It's worth noting that Dilger's wording, "installed," is different from the FBI's wording, "transmitted to.")

    In other words, nothing to see here, folks.


    How do you get the free java program of the day from Amazon?


     


    Then there are the phone manufacturer stores and phone network stores.


     


    Can you configure a list of trusted sources or is it one in all in?

  • Reply 66 of 104
    hill60hill60 Posts: 6,992member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by addicted44 View Post


    The original iPhone gained this feature (once the App Store was opened) through the App Store a long time ago. I remember downloading the App (Can't remember it's name now, and am at work, so can't look it up), and using it maybe once.


     


    Next time I upgraded my phone, I deleted the app.


     


    The only benefit to this feature in practice I have noticed is sharing Contacts. But it is a clumsy way to do it. Sending contacts via Message is far easier. It helps when you have poor service though, or are sharing your contact with someone whose number you don't have.



    Bump, it was the one billionth App download.

  • Reply 67 of 104

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by derekmorr View Post





    Hardly. This isn't the first baseless, hysterical Android malware hit piece I've seen, and it won't be the last. Every few weeks we see some new inflated claim from a security consultancy that Android malware increased dramatically. But if you look closely, you'll see they almost never disclose their methodology, which makes it hard to take them seriously. Also, it appears that many of them curiously classify adware as malware, leading to inflated numbers. In most cases, these companies are trying to scare Android users into buying their anti-virus products, which are snakeoil.

    Further, when pressed, these companies admit their data is overhyped and that most malware comes from apps outside the Google Play Store. Quoting from McAfee's Q1 2012 report:

    And it's worth repeating that third-party app stores are blocked by default. Users have to go into their security settings and click through this dialog to enable them:



    You'd think that at some point people would start looking at the actual data instead of the hype. I'm still waiting for that to happen. To be clear, I'm not suggesting that Android is flawless; no OS is. And there are areas where one can make legitimate, data-driven criticisms of Android security. But these malware scare pieces aren't among them.

    It's also worth asking -- why does Apple Insider continue to run these anti-Android hit pieces? I don't see this sort of platform bashing on other tech news sites. Android Central doesn't run stories trashing iOS; WMPowerUser doesn't feel the need to bash Android, etc. But I see quite a bit of this hit pseudo-journalism on Apple-related sites.


     


     


    Oh Ok, like nearly ALL the "pieces" (no pun intended) against Apple the last three weeks weren't HIT pieces?  If not, what were they?  

  • Reply 68 of 104
    hill60 wrote: »
    How do you get the free java program of the day from Amazon?

    Then there are the phone manufacturer stores and phone network stores.

    Can you configure a list of trusted sources or is it one in all in?

    It isn't a Java program. It's a Dalvik program. Android doesn't use the Java Virtual Machine.

    To install the Amazon App Store, you have to enable third-party markets, or use an Amazon Android device. Even if you enable third-party apps, apps aren't installed automatically. The user is still prompted to install them. The install lists the permissions the app needs -- the user can clearly see if the app wants access to personal information or to services that potentially cost money.

    Currently, it is a global on/off toggle. I'd like it to be more configurable, but that doesn't negate my point.
  • Reply 69 of 104
    apple ][apple ][ Posts: 8,687member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Neo42 View Post


     Generally anyone sporting some type of consciousness will avoid malicious software on an Android device.  



     


    I think that you're overestimating the average customer. The average customer is not somebody who spends time on tech forums and might know about these things. The average customer is clueless.

  • Reply 70 of 104
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,906member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by hill60 View Post


    How do you get the free java program of the day from Amazon?



    You can't unless you override the default Android security settings as shown in Derekmorr's screenshot.

  • Reply 71 of 104
    joshajosha Posts: 901member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Jivanile View Post



    Who cares if someone can steal my information so easy, it has sd card expansion slots, removable batteries, widgets, and you can swipe your palm to take a screenshot. Malware Shmalware.


    Yes this is a non event for my Android Phone!


    I have nothing valuable on it. Only a 6 entry address book.


    They'll not get my expansion card info, because I remove it between calls.


    My batteries are safe, I always carry them in secure pocket, because I often need them after 8 hrs of use.


    Nope I don't do screen shots, that's a real security exposure!

  • Reply 72 of 104
    gijoeinla wrote: »

    Oh Ok, like nearly ALL the "pieces" (no pun intended) against Apple the last three weeks weren't HIT pieces?  If not, what were they?  

    The first and most important difference there is that there was actually news in the articles about Maps. Apple removed a perfectly functional app and replaced with something less functional (note that I didn't say the new app is useless because it isn't). Furthermore the story was picked up by the media broadly. The media ran their (usually) one story per source. Some tech blogs posted multiple stories. This site posted the most that I saw anywhere.

    The second difference is that this story serves nobody in the site's target audience (Apple users) and is obviously telling half-truths in order to add to a myth that's popular among readers here. Basically this article was only written to spread misinformation whereas the articles you're referring to were pertinent to the audience and were factual, designed to inform the many iPhone users of something important to know before upgrading. I never saw an article that said anything like, “Do not buy the iPhone 5 because Maps is unfit for consumers." Instead what they said was more like, “When you make your decision to upgrade, be aware that you will have a slightly different experience with the new Maps in the near term."
  • Reply 73 of 104
    iPhone 5 thank you.
  • Reply 74 of 104
    joshajosha Posts: 901member
    shompa wrote: »
    This is PC all over again.
    The big question: what is google hiding?
    In my country we have a legal right to know everything a company stores on their computers about a customer. I did a legal request a month ago. Google is the only company that refuses give me the data.
    I hope I win in court.

    Of course Google is hiding all the info they can get on everyone. As is Facebook.
    Google wants all sPhones to be open, so they can install their spying malware.
    They don't care what other malware gets installed on their leaky android.

    Good luck in court !
  • Reply 75 of 104
    cgjcgj Posts: 276member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


     


    No, I'm pretty sure the average person is okay with getting their stuff legally and having illegal stuff removed. 



    No, that's not what I said.


     


    I said you are probably the only person (aside from companies) that would complain about multimedia content (and we're not talking about child porn here) not being removed.

  • Reply 76 of 104
    I don't care what platform you're on, whether it be Android or IOS, Windows or OSX. Don't open strange emails, and don't run/install random programs. Some OSes may be more secure than others, but there's not such thing as 100% secure. Stay vigilant and you'll be better off.

    This message brought to you by your friendly, neighborhood IT guy... and the letter M. ;)



    ...Off-topic...
    No, I'm pretty sure the average person is okay with getting their stuff legally and having illegal stuff removed. 

    Not arguing your points about YouTube, but the above statement I don't agree with. The average person would be perfectly happy to get media illegally if (a) it were free/cheap, and (b) they wouldn't get caught. The average person doesn't care about copyright law no matter how many PSAs the MPAA runs before movies.

    You and I may care, but the average person is greedy and selfish. Just saying...
  • Reply 77 of 104


    Originally Posted by CGJ View Post

    I said you are probably the only person (aside from companies) that would complain about multimedia content (and we're not talking about child porn here) not being removed.


     


    Ah, I see what you mean. I still disagree.

  • Reply 78 of 104


    Seriously...an article about the dangers of clicking links in a "work-at-home" email is news?...only on AI. You would either have to be living without the internet for the last decade or a complete idiot to fall for that one.


     


    Fortunately, I just sent over my bank information to a lawyer in Africa who found a recently deceased relative that left me a substantial inheritance, so I have no need to click on those...

  • Reply 79 of 104
    The first and most important difference there is that there was actually news in the articles about Maps. Apple removed a perfectly functional app and replaced with something less functional (note that I didn't say the new app is useless because it isn't). Furthermore the story was picked up by the media broadly. The media ran their (usually) one story per source. Some tech blogs posted multiple stories. This site posted the most that I saw anywhere.
    The second difference is that this story serves nobody in the site's target audience (Apple users) and is obviously telling half-truths in order to add to a myth that's popular among readers here. Basically this article was only written to spread misinformation whereas the articles you're referring to were pertinent to the audience and were factual, designed to inform the many iPhone users of something important to know before upgrading. I never saw an article that said anything like, “Do not buy the iPhone 5 because Maps is unfit for consumers." Instead what they said was more like, “When you make your decision to upgrade, be aware that you will have a slightly different experience with the new Maps in the near term."

    If you got all your Apple maps news from Apple Insider you'd think every site had 15 articles on it.
  • Reply 80 of 104
    joshajosha Posts: 901member
    The FBI's Internet Crime Complaint Center has issued a warning alerting users about malware that targets the Android mobile operating system.cluding the default settings. Turn off features of the device not needed to minimize the attack surface of the device.
    >The presence of malware on Android has been known for <a href="http://appleinsider.com/articles/11/08/03/lookout_retrevio_warn_of_growing_android_malware_epidemic_note_apples_ios_is_far_safer">some time</a>, while Apple's tightly controlled iOS platform is <a href="http://appleinsider.com/articles/11/08/24/apples_ios_unaffected_by_malware_as_android_exploits_surge_76">far less susceptible</a> to malware. This summer, one piece of malware did manage to <a href="http://appleinsider.com/articles/12/07/05/apple_pulls_russian_malware_from_ios_app_store">slip through the cracks</a> and was temporarily available for download on Apple's iOS App Store.

    What really is the problem here ?
    Android is well known as a platform for Google's Spyware.
    So a few others join Google, little difference ? :D
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