MacBook Pro Retina with 3 Years of AppleCare now as low as $1,539; some bundles cut by $750

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware edited January 2014
Following Apple's MacBook Pro with Retina display price cuts on Wednesday, Apple Authorized Reseller and AppleInsider sponsor B&H Photo similarly slashed the prices of their exclusive bundles, including the 13-inch Retina MacBook Pro with 3 years of AppleCare extended protection, which now starts at just $1,539; some 15-inch Retina MacBook Pro AppleCare bundles were also cut by as much as $770.

MacBook Pro with Retina Display + 3 Years of AppleCare

MacBook Pro


The B&H bundle discounts apply to Apple's MacBook Pro with Retina display laptops, with the reseller offering the 2.5GHz 13-inch model (8GB RAM/128 SSD) and a 3-year AppleCare extended protection plan for only $1,539 (a $409 savings compared to Apple's price). Alternatively, those who are looking for Apple's top-of-the-line 13-inch laptop can save $554 if they choose the 2.5GHz version configured with 8GB of RAM and a 768GB SSD.

As for the 15-inch Retina MacBook Pros, B&H is offering bundled savings for a well-equipped 2.4GHz model (8GB RAM/256GB SSD) starting at $2,321 (a $427 savings from Apple's price).

The greatest savings can be had when purchasing the B&H Photo bundle for Apple's flagship 15-inch Retina MacBook Pro, which comes kitted out with a 2.7GHz quad-core processor, 16GB of memory and a 768GB flash drive for $3,321. That price is a whopping $777 discount from Apple's own store.

To take advantage of the unbeatable B&H prices offered only to AppleInsider readers, visit the Price Guides. We've also put together a step-by-step guide to make sure you can take full advantage of the Mac+AppleCare bundle discounts.

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 29
    They forgot to add "and AppleInsider will stay on this story as it develops..."
  • Reply 2 of 29
    The more AI pushes AppleCare plans, the more I worry about A) what they know about Apple's quality control that I apparently don't, and B) how big of a cut they are getting for every plan they help sell.
    This is getting ridiculous. Best Buy doesn't try this hard to sell extended warranties.
  • Reply 3 of 29

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Cash907 View Post



    The more AI pushes AppleCare plans, the more I worry about A) what they know about Apple's quality control that I apparently don't, and B) how big of a cut they are getting for every plan they help sell.

    This is getting ridiculous. Best Buy doesn't try this hard to sell extended warranties.


    "Best Buy doesn't try this hard to sell extended warranties."


     


    I beg to differ.


     


    It's generally well-known that when buying higher-end gear like Macs, getting AppleCare is not only important but well worth it.  At least that's been my experience.

  • Reply 4 of 29
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,492member
    "<span style="background-color:rgb(241,241,241);line-height:1.231;">Best Buy doesn't try this hard to sell extended warranties."</span>


    <span style="background-color:rgb(241,241,241);line-height:1.231;">I beg to differ.</span>


    <span style="background-color:rgb(241,241,241);line-height:1.231;">It's generally well-known that when buying higher-end gear like Macs, getting AppleCare is not only important but well worth it.  At least that's been my experience.</span>

    Agree 100%. Apple has saved my bacon with Apple Care several times. Once when facing a deadlines for an ESPN show they shipped me a monitor the same day when one of mine failed. They are extremely flexible and considerate in my experience. I actually got a replacement ACD the next morning before I even shipped the faulty one back.
  • Reply 5 of 29

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Cash907 View Post



    The more AI pushes AppleCare plans, the more I worry about A) what they know about Apple's quality control that I apparently don't, and B) how big of a cut they are getting for every plan they help sell.

    This is getting ridiculous. Best Buy doesn't try this hard to sell extended warranties.


     


    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Shameer Mulji View Post


    "Best Buy doesn't try this hard to sell extended warranties."


     


    I beg to differ.


     


    It's generally well-known that when buying higher-end gear like Macs, getting AppleCare is not only important but well worth it.  At least that's been my experience.



     


    I agree with the latter. Best Buy (and Radio Shack, etc.) would push me to buy extended warranty on a paper clip.

  • Reply 6 of 29


    I think the moral of the story is that Apple is making this the standard MacBook Pro product. Very few other companies have caught onto this trend yet, thus creating a potentially large opportunity for Apple to make their laptops stand out beyond their signature design (which is widely copied and, frankly, a bit dated).


     


    Somehow, I am not convinced Apple is marketing this as effectively as I had expected. Developers and consumers don't seem to fully realize the big step forward this is.

  • Reply 7 of 29
    It's more disconcerting that AI pushes these prices. What on earth are you talking about?

    15" 2.7Ghz 768GB SSD Retina MBP(WITH Apple Care) is now $3,548 on the Apple Store website.

    How much is this B&H paying AI? $3321.0 is a $227 difference, not $700+.

    Incredibly misleading. :no:
  • Reply 8 of 29


    Originally Posted by Cash907 View Post

    The more AI pushes AppleCare plans, the more I worry about A) what they know about Apple's quality control that I apparently don't, and B) how big of a cut they are getting for every plan they help sell.

    This is getting ridiculous. Best Buy doesn't try this hard to sell extended warranties.


     


    …AppleCare… … [is] always worth its price and then some.

  • Reply 9 of 29
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    …AppleCare… [is] always worth its price and then some.

    I'd love for Apple to support of their products for more than a year but until that happens I'll gladly buy AC and AC+. The ability to sell a 2 year old machine with a 1 year warranty remaining is well worth the expense.
  • Reply 10 of 29
    mazda 3smazda 3s Posts: 1,611member


    Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

    …AppleCare… [is] always worth its price and then some.


    Don't most credit cards give you an extra year of warranty for free?

  • Reply 11 of 29
    blah64blah64 Posts: 990member


    Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post


    …AppleCare… [is] always worth its price and then some.



     


    It's very, very rare that I disagree with your posts here on AI, but I totally disagree with this comment.


     


    Background: I've been purchasing and using Apple products since before Macs existed, using Macs since 1985.  I can't even count the number of Macs I've bought and owned over the years; I can see 6 from where I'm sitting right now -- and that's the view from my frickin' dining room!


     


    I have never, ever purchased AppleCare, and I am literally thousands of dollars richer because of it.  I've only had problems twice in all these years where I had to bring a machine back to a dealer (pre-Apple store days).  I know one of them was fully covered, and the other is so long ago that I honestly can't remember, but I think it was.  My next 3 or 4 computers could all be total duds and I would still be ahead after paying for their repairs out of pocket.  Not only that, but the machines come with a 1 year warranty without paying an extra dime, right?  Most problems are just handled.  I really don't understand why people are so willing to shell out for AppleCare.


     


    The only thing that comes to mind right now is that perhaps I and my family are just more careful than most people.  While I'm sure that's true to a point, it strains credibility to think that alone explains such a huge difference of opinion by so many others.  What do you guys do with your computers that they break so often?  Drop them?  Take them out in the rain?  I don't get it.

  • Reply 12 of 29

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Shameer Mulji View Post


    "Best Buy doesn't try this hard to sell extended warranties."


     


    I beg to differ.


     


    It's generally well-known that when buying higher-end gear like Macs, getting AppleCare is not only important but well worth it.  At least that's been my experience.



    I agree! Anecdotal, I know. But my original intel 20" iMac had it's motherboard replaced a month before AppleCare ended. I think this is why it is still going strong, what 6-7 years later? Whew, was I ever lucky.

  • Reply 13 of 29
    Well, I bought the new 13 inch with retina about ten days ago for about 1699 (128SSD). And as soon as I saw the prices go down I returned it and got a new one with 256SSD for the same price. (I bought it at the military exchange store, tax free) :D
  • Reply 14 of 29
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 13,377member


    That is highly debatable.   Each person buying a MBP needs to evaluate its worth based on their circumstances.   Beyond that AppleCare is very expensive if you don't use it. 


     


    Instead of knee jerk buying people should evaluate AppleCare based on their specific needs.   In my case I get it for my iPhone but not for my Macs.    Most people would be better off stuffing the cost of AppleCare into a bank account someplace.   


    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

    …AppleCare… [is] always worth its price and then some.

  • Reply 15 of 29
    jragostajragosta Posts: 10,473member
    blah64 wrote: »
    It's very, very rare that I disagree with your posts here on AI, but I totally disagree with this comment.

    Background: I've been purchasing and using Apple products since before Macs existed, using Macs since 1985.  I can't even count the number of Macs I've bought and owned over the years; I can see 6 from where I'm sitting right now -- and that's the view from my frickin' dining room!

    I have never, ever purchased AppleCare, and I am literally thousands of dollars richer because of it.  I've only had problems twice in all these years where I had to bring a machine back to a dealer (pre-Apple store days).  I know one of them was fully covered, and the other is so long ago that I honestly can't remember, but I think it was.  My next 3 or 4 computers could all be total duds and I would still be ahead after paying for their repairs out of pocket.  Not only that, but the machines come with a 1 year warranty without paying an extra dime, right?  Most problems are just handled.  I really don't understand why people are so willing to shell out for AppleCare.

    The only thing that comes to mind right now is that perhaps I and my family are just more careful than most people.  While I'm sure that's true to a point, it strains credibility to think that alone explains such a huge difference of opinion by so many others.  What do you guys do with your computers that they break so often?  Drop them?  Take them out in the rain?  I don't get it.

    YMMV, of course, Some of it probably IS due to your family being more careful than others.

    Logically, you are probably correct, on average. Apple couldn't afford to offer it if it regularly cost them more than they received in premiums. Some of that difference is made up by the fact that they buy repair parts wholesale and you'd have to buy them retail. Still, that doesn't account for enough to change the logic that it is probably a money-maker for Apple and therefore, ON AVERAGE, it might not pay off.

    However, I'm firmly in the AppleCare camp. I guess it helps that I used to travel well over 100,000 miles a year with my laptop and it got bounced around quite a bit. For me, it's worth the cost for the peace of mind, if nothing else. AppleCare meant that when I had a problem, I was at the top of the list and could get a computer shipped to me right away if there was a major problem. That was easily worth the premium that I paid. Plus, while I didn't keep track, I strongly suspect that, for me, the program paid for itself. That's a lot of mileage and a lot of being thrown around for a laptop.
  • Reply 16 of 29
    dunksdunks Posts: 1,254member
    The real story here is why anyone would ever be willing to pay $1500 or more for a laptop with integrated graphics.

    Currently the only laptops that represent any sense of value are the 13-inch Macbook Air and the 15-inch Pro with retina display. The graphics card isn't even a configuration option unless you shell out for the top end US$2799 (AU$3199) laptop.

    Customer: "I want a decent graphics card but I don't want to lug around a 15 inch laptop?"

    Apple: [SPOILER=Warning: Spoiler!]"Too bad... You don't fit into our upsell strategy."[/SPOILER]
  • Reply 17 of 29
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 13,377member


    For the most part I don't think people understand the economics involved.  AppleCare isn't cheap though it certainly can be of value to certain types of users.   This is why I suggest people think long and hard about AppleCare.  


     


    Applecare can be of significant value to someone that has one and only one computer and that computer is critical to the,     A common example here would be a college student.  For many of us though AppleCare is a waste of money.  It effectively increase the purchase cost while eliminating the possibility of that money earning income for the owner. 


    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Blah64 View Post


     


    It's very, very rare that I disagree with your posts here on AI, but I totally disagree with this comment.


     


    Background: I've been purchasing and using Apple products since before Macs existed, using Macs since 1985.  I can't even count the number of Macs I've bought and owned over the years; I can see 6 from where I'm sitting right now -- and that's the view from my frickin' dining room!


     


    I have never, ever purchased AppleCare, and I am literally thousands of dollars richer because of it.  I've only had problems twice in all these years where I had to bring a machine back to a dealer (pre-Apple store days).  I know one of them was fully covered, and the other is so long ago that I honestly can't remember, but I think it was.  My next 3 or 4 computers could all be total duds and I would still be ahead after paying for their repairs out of pocket.  Not only that, but the machines come with a 1 year warranty without paying an extra dime, right?  Most problems are just handled.  I really don't understand why people are so willing to shell out for AppleCare.


     


    The only thing that comes to mind right now is that perhaps I and my family are just more careful than most people.  While I'm sure that's true to a point, it strains credibility to think that alone explains such a huge difference of opinion by so many others.  What do you guys do with your computers that they break so often?  Drop them?  Take them out in the rain?  I don't get it.


  • Reply 18 of 29
    dunks wrote: »
    The real story here is why anyone would ever be willing to pay $1500 or more for a laptop with integrated graphics.

    I've done it for years. I was quite happy to get rid of my 12" PB with a discrete GPU for a 13" MB with an integrated GPU, then 2 more MBs, and 2 13" MBPs all with iGPUs. The real story here is why anyone would say that the GPUs Apple uses aren't decent. They aren't powerhouses. They aren't for any intense graphics that a gamer or video editor might use but when did "not being exactly what I want" become "it's not decent"? Clearly there are a lot of happy people who buy a lot more of their sub-15" machines than their 15" or greater machines.

    Now I wouldn't have a problem with Apple offering a better GPU (and I would have likely bought such a model if there were overwhelming negative affects to my usage type) but I don't see why that has to automatically be a dGPU. As previously noted the dGPU in my PB was worse than the iGPU of my MB. If it's about performance then you shouldn't make the argument about whether it's integrated or separate.

    Finally, have considered what would happen if Apple stuck a dGPU in the MBAs or 13" MBP? Have you considered that would likely mean reducing the battery volume? Have you considered a larger or faster fan and more space for cooling the GPU that would likely reduce the battery even more? Have you considered the increased power costs the GPU and the fan would have on this battery that is not even smaller than before? The 15" RMBP goes from 7 hours to 5 hours with ?30% larger battery. 95W v 74W. I can only imagine that the dGPU in much smaller battery would affect that divide even more radically, now consider the additional battery chipping I mentioned earlier. It's not good.

    Now you can say "Apple doesn't need to make their machines so thin" but that what they do, just as making their battery life last within a certain range, and it's what every Mac user should expect. They work to make the overall product the best (according to their standards) which means they have to sacrifice power eating performance at times. We don't have to like it but we do have to accept it.

    wizard69 wrote: »
    For the most part I don't think people understand the economics involved.  AppleCare isn't cheap though it certainly can be of value to certain types of users.   This is why I suggest people think long and hard about AppleCare.  

    Applecare can be of significant value to someone that has one and only one computer and that computer is critical to the,     A common example here would be a college student.  For many of us though AppleCare is a waste of money.  It effectively increase the purchase cost while eliminating the possibility of that money earning income for the owner. 

    I also suggest people don't buy AppleCare right away. You have up to a year of your purchase date (not received date if it was shipped) to purchase it.

    For the iPhone I do suggest AC+ at purchase. You technically have 30 days but it's easier to purchase it then and if anything happens, like accidental damage, you can screw yourself. With as much use as a smartphone gets and where it gets used I think it's a good investment for nearly all users.
  • Reply 19 of 29
    mazda 3smazda 3s Posts: 1,611member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post





    For the iPhone I do suggest AC+ at purchase. You technically have 30 days but it's easier to purchase it then and if anything happens, like accidental damage, you can screw yourself. With as much use as a smartphone gets and where it gets used I think it's a good investment for nearly all users.


     


    I'm with you on this. I've never bought Applecare for my MacBooks, and not even for my 15" Retina MacBook Pro (my CC gives me an additional year's warranty, so why bother). I did, however, buy AppleCare for my iPhone 5 "just in case". I can do without my MacBook Pro for a few days or even a week or so if it needs to be sent off for repair (I can always use my wife's MacBook Air), but I don't have another phone to fallback on.

  • Reply 20 of 29
    dunksdunks Posts: 1,254member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post



    ...they aren't for any intense graphics that a gamer or video editor might use...


     


     


    My point exactly.

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