China's state media attack on Apple appears to have backfired

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 43
    joshajosha Posts: 901member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Ochyming View Post



    The Dictatorship Party is afraid of Apple?

    I guess so.



    Nah!


    China Gov is just jealous of Apple's success.


    Also afraid Apple is becoming a religious or political power in China.


     


    Of course this simply shows the China Gov is terrified of China people thinking independently.


    The only thing the China Gov should fear, IS THEMSELVES !!!

  • Reply 22 of 43
    You mean the Chinese social media users are savvy enough to identify State-sponsored anti-Apple concern trolling when they see it?

    Indeed American readers are not savvy enough; and are deluded to believe our media is more honest; and constantly repeat here-say and bought-and-paid-for BS (analysts) as fact.
  • Reply 23 of 43
    freerangefreerange Posts: 1,595member


    You can be sure that Samsung, a major advertiser on CCTV, was also behind this as it was their paid spokespeople involved. They are truly a scumbag company.

  • Reply 24 of 43
    freerangefreerange Posts: 1,595member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by matrix07 View Post


    Without further evidence, I believe this is the Chinese government doing. To rally people for something else (foreigner's greed, nationalism) instead of what they are supposed to focus (freedom). Notice it's not all about Apple but foreign corporations.



     


    nonsense - as a major CCTV advertiser they most assuredly had advance knowledge of the show and used their paid spokespeople to spread their evil - it would be naive to believe otherwise with this blatantly and pathetically immoral company

  • Reply 25 of 43
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,365member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


    And some people claim there aren't paid anti-Apple shills… 



    So at the same time you discourage shill tags at AI you also encourage shill talk. No wonder certain members feel free to use it like milk for cereal. Consistency would be nice.


     


    As far as this specific incident, does anything get broadcast on state-run China Central that isn't in agreement with official Chinese government policy? I think that should make it fairly clear who wants to be sure Apple toes the line. But that's just me, and I'm no Samsung supporter as a rule.

  • Reply 26 of 43
    hftshfts Posts: 386member
    One can deduce who the paid shrills are on AI.
    Ask these questions:
    1. How frequently are they posting?
    2. Are the vast majority of their posts negative towards Apple? But worded in such a way to not be so obvious
    The trolls (unpaid shrills) don't have the training, so can be easily picked out
    3. Have they ever posted Apple in a positive light? The paid shrills be be smart to cover their tracks with this wily
    manouver
    4. Last but not least, when asked why they post on AI, they will NEVER respond

    The paid shrill attracts the trolls to the infected site in large numbers, and the sheer weight slowly grinds the site down, polluting the discussions with stupid comments, lies, distractions, anything to make it less enjoyable to the fans of the site. In time the fans post less or leave the site.
    Paid shrill gets congratulated by Page or that slime ball samdung CEO in Seoul, a nice pay check and of he goes to find the next pro Apple site.
    As of late I have found AI to be rather an unpleasant experience.
    I really don't need the agro, so I think I will take an extended break from posting.
    A big f(!king thank you to the pricks, congratulations job well done.
    However a big thank you to jragosta or what ever its name is. Thanks for proving that the world is truly made up of large number of a-holes, you should be crowned the king a-hole. Thanks for spoiling things for me c:&t.
  • Reply 27 of 43
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,365member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by hfts View Post



    One can deduce who the paid shrills are on AI.


    If you're going to claim you know all about them at least get the wording right. I noticed the same misspelling a few days ago.


     


    S-H-I-L-L not shrill.


     


    "You would know" is sure to follow. . .  wait for it. . .

  • Reply 28 of 43
    reefoidreefoid Posts: 158member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by hfts View Post



    One can deduce who the paid shrills are on AI.

    Ask these questions:

    1. How frequently are they posting?

    2. Are the vast majority of their posts negative towards Apple? But worded in such a way to not be so obvious

    The trolls (unpaid shrills) don't have the training, so can be easily picked out

    3. Have they ever posted Apple in a positive light? The paid shrills be be smart to cover their tracks with this wily

    manouver

    4. Last but not least, when asked why they post on AI, they will NEVER respond



    The paid shrill attracts the trolls to the infected site in large numbers, and the sheer weight slowly grinds the site down, polluting the discussions with stupid comments, lies, distractions, anything to make it less enjoyable to the fans of the site. In time the fans post less or leave the site.

    Paid shrill gets congratulated by Page or that slime ball samdung CEO in Seoul, a nice pay check and of he goes to find the next pro Apple site.

    As of late I have found AI to be rather an unpleasant experience.

    I really don't need the agro, so I think I will take an extended break from posting.

    A big f(!king thank you to the pricks, congratulations job well done.

    However a big thank you to jragosta or what ever its name is. Thanks for proving that the world is truly made up of large number of a-holes, you should be crowned the king a-hole. Thanks for spoiling things for me c:&t.


    When you say 'as of late', do you mean the last six months since you joined?  I agree the quality of the site has gone downhill since then what with all your noise.


     


    See you later.  You will not be missed, I can guarantee that.

  • Reply 29 of 43
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,034member


    This is such a bizarre story.


     


    Just... why?  What was the point?

  • Reply 30 of 43
    What the ....?!?

    You mean a government that uses the anachronistic method of neocommunism,
    kills their own citizens in the street in broad daylight for the whole world to see &
    represses free expression on the penalty of an indefinate stay at a deathcamp
    actually lied in a media situation???

    *yawn*

    I wonder now if Apple's soured on the idea of doing business with China Mobile
    when obviously they're not wanted so they can exclusively sell Chinese handsets?
  • Reply 31 of 43
    patsupatsu Posts: 430member
    gatorguy wrote: »
    So at the same time you discourage shill tags at AI you also encourage shill talk. No wonder certain members feel free to use it like milk for cereal. Consistency would be nice.

    As far as this specific incident, does anything get broadcast on state-run China Central that isn't in agreement with official Chinese government policy? I think that should make it fairly clear who wants to be sure Apple toes the line. But that's just me, and I'm no Samsung supporter as a rule.

    CCTV should be able to broadcast anything as long as it doesn't offend the party. They don't always have a party agenda. They don't really need to "buy" support from the celebs to hype an episode though. Apple's name and CCTV's reach should be more than enough. Perhaps someone is over eager to stop Apple. ^_^
  • Reply 32 of 43
    xsuxsu Posts: 401member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by JoshA View Post


    China Gov is just jealous of Apple's success.


    Also afraid Apple is becoming a religious or political power in China.


     


    Of course this simply shows the China Gov is terrified of China people thinking independently.


    The only thing the China Gov should fear, IS THEMSELVES !!!



     


    Not so in this case.  Apple's warranty and service rules can indeed be considered deficient according to Chinese law on such matters.  Chinese law requires a reset of warranty period when the customer is given a replacement product when the original was brought in for service.  The law also requires that the replacement product has to be new, not refurbished  Apple's rule does not conform to these requirements.


     


    This is no different than European countries suing Apple to have the warranty period extended according to their laws.  All of you harping on this because it's coming from Chinese government are just showing your bias and prejudice.

  • Reply 33 of 43


    Funny because in China on CCTV they run infomercials promoting their own iPhone-like device where they blatantly copied iPhone's build and design and they promote how it has Siri-like features and FaceTime, but looks like cheap plastic. All for I think ¥299 RMB ($48) or something. 

  • Reply 34 of 43
    patsupatsu Posts: 430member
    xsu wrote: »
    Not so in this case.  Apple's warranty and service rules can indeed be considered deficient according to Chinese law on such matters.  Chinese law requires a reset of warranty period when the customer is given a replacement product when the original was brought in for service.  The law also requires that the replacement product has to be new, not refurbished  Apple's rule does not conform to these requirements.

    This is no different than European countries suing Apple to have the warranty period extended according to their laws.  All of you harping on this because it's coming from Chinese government are just showing your bias and prejudice.

    I bought electronics and bags from China. None of the makers honor the regulations. If the government want to enforce them, they should impose the regulations on all companies uniformly.

    They should also target the bootleg products and fake food/beverages on the market.
  • Reply 35 of 43
    anonymouseanonymouse Posts: 6,677member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


    So at the same time you discourage shill tags at AI you also encourage shill talk. No wonder certain members feel free to use it like milk for cereal. Consistency would be nice.


     


    As far as this specific incident, does anything get broadcast on state-run China Central that isn't in agreement with official Chinese government policy? I think that should make it fairly clear who wants to be sure Apple toes the line. But that's just me, and I'm no Samsung supporter as a rule.



     


    It's not surprising to see you denying the existence of shills. Funny, but not surprising. Just make sure you don't flub your lines.

  • Reply 36 of 43
    So THAT'S where Samsung has been spending all those marketing dollars. Come on Apple! You're falling behind on the spending compared to them!! Innovate like Samsung!
  • Reply 37 of 43
    icoco3icoco3 Posts: 1,471member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


    And some people claim there aren't paid anti-Apple shills… 





    How dare you insinuate such an outrageous insult !!  /s

  • Reply 38 of 43
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member


    Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

    I have [insert Apple product here] and [cite news article here] I [give personal example of same issue] and I am afraid I will be selling my [list Apple products here] and will be buying [insert competitors product here] because [insert glowing review of competitor product here including negative Apple saying of the day].


     


    [Post to Appleinsider at x:xx]


     


    Nah, I just can't see it happening.



     


    Humorously enough, there's a prevalent set of spambots here whose code is screwed up. They wind up writing a string of their code to their biography section, so it looks something like "]; is_human=2; post(" image





    Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

    So at the same time you discourage shill tags at AI you also encourage shill talk. No wonder certain members feel free to use it like milk for cereal. Consistency would be nice.


     


    There's quite a difference between claiming a user is a shill and acknowledging the existence thereof.


     


    It's the difference between saying "The people that use [device] are idiots" and "You are an idiot for using [device]".

  • Reply 39 of 43
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,365member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


     


    Humorously enough, there's a prevalent set of spambots here whose code is screwed up. They wind up writing a string of their code to their biography section, so it looks something like "]; is_human=2; post(" image


     


    There's quite a difference between claiming a user is a shill and acknowledging the existence thereof.


     


    It's the difference between saying "The people that use [device] are idiots" and "You are an idiot for using [device]".



    Agreed, except that as the mod who asked for the shill claims to stop it wasn't a great idea for you personally to raise the issue. Let someone else do it. . .


    and they will.


     


    Around here it sometimes seems like trying to deal with a room full of testosterone-filled junior high boys. If it looks to them like a mixed message then it's probably taken that way.

  • Reply 40 of 43
    tomdritomdri Posts: 18member
    A report by the state-run China Central Television that intended to smear Apple as bad for consumers has instead harmed the network's remaining credibility after a local celebrity apparently flubbed his lines when posting phony outrage as a disgruntled "Apple fan."

    According to a <a href="http://blogs.wsj.com/chinarealtime/2013/03/18/apple-attack-backfires-for-state-broadcaster/">report</a> by the <em>Wall Street Journal</em> "China Real Time Report" blog, the Communist Party's CCTV initially aired a "Consumer Rights Day" broadcast on March 15th that celebrated consumer power, complete with song and dance routines.

    The broadcast mixed in accusations that Apple was "biased against Chinese consumers in its warranty and customer service policies," along with implications that Volkswagen was selling defective cars in China.

    <div align="center"><img src="http://photos.appleinsidercdn.com/820.031813.1.jpg" alt="Post around 820"></div>

    Following the 3/15 CCTV broadcast, a message posted to the Sina Weibo (China's version of Twitter) account of Taiwanese-American actor (and reportedly a spokesman for Samsung's Galaxy products) Peter Ho stated, with the hash tag "#315 on the move" (a reference to the broadcast):

    "Cannot believe Apple is playing so many dirty tricks in customer service. As an Apple fan, I feel hurt. Won?t you [Apple] feel ashamed in front of Steve Jobs? Won?t you feel ashamed in front of those young people who sell their kidneys for your products? You dare to bully consumers simply because you are a famous brand. Need to send out at about 8:20 pm."

    Users on Weibo immediately noted <a href="http://offbeatchina.com/china-state-medias-accusation-of-apple-backfired">a series of negative messages</a> posted at 8:20pm by several Weibo celebrities. Somewhat ironically, apparently all of the prominent 8:20 posts (including Ho's) were posted using Apple products, either an iPhone or iPad (below).

    <div align="center"><img src="http://photos.appleinsidercdn.com/820.031813.2.jpg" alt="Post around 820"></div>

    The orchestrated posts kicked off speculation that Ho and other prominent Weibo users had been supplied with talking points (and likely paid) as part of a state sponsored effort to spread CCTV's propaganda via social networking.

    Ho subsequently denied posting the message, then added that he suspected that his account had been hacked, then eventually deleted all three posts from the Twitter-like service. A backlash of critical posts then followed, popularizing the hashtag #PostAround820 until the microblogging service began censoring the tag.

    "I?ve heard that CCTV asked several Weibo celebrities to post negative things about Apple around 8:20," one user <a href="http://www.tealeafnation.com/2013/03/prominent-weibo-users-paid-to-bash-apple-introducing-chinas-820-party/">posted</a>, "As a result, Mr. Liu, Zheng Yuanjie, and their compatriots were outed by Peter Ho?s post at 8:20, so now Peter Ho is pretending his phone was stolen and someone posted on his Weibo, and deleting comments on his Weibo as fast as lightning. Tens of thousands of comments have been trimmed down to a couple thousand."

    "Would the all-powerful CCTV please tell us which brands haven?t discriminated against the people of this Heavenly Kingdom? Post around 8:20," another user sarcastically posted in response.

    Another wrote, "The 3.15 consumer right show is much more disgusting than the companies it exposed. At least Apple still offers post-sale customer service. How about those victims of Sanlu?s toxic baby powder? Has anyone taken care of them?"

    One "vocal critic on Weibo" commented: "Which exposed company is the most surprising to you on this year?s 3.15? My answer is: the state-run television of our country, which turned a blind eye to the thousands of dead pigs floating on the water source of the country?s biggest city, but put all emphasis on a cell phone company who doesn?t replace back cover for its customers. I don?t know where the heart of this country go."<q>"The only party poised to gain from the scandal, it seems, is Apple, for whom CCTV?s consumer rights expose may prove a blessing in disguise"</q>

    A report by journalist Liz Carter, who reports on Chinese social networking, stated "the 8:20 incident has already been picked up by every major Chinese news organization, and is sure to be a public relations nightmare for the celebrities, CCTV, and Sina Weibo. The only party poised to gain from the scandal, it seems, is Apple, for whom CCTV?s consumer rights expose may prove a blessing in disguise."

    The <em>Wall Street Journal</em> stated that "the reaction on Weibo points to rising mistrust of the country?s state-run media outlets among Chinese Internet users, who have increasing access to alternate sources of information via social media."

    "News gathering in China, where censorship is a norm and freedom of the press is limited at best, is frequently mired in corruption," the report noted, adding that "Stories are often driven by financial incentives or government directives. CCTV has been particularly aggressive in its annual Consumer Rights Day reports, including last year when it slammed McDonald?s Corp. with damaging allegations the fast food giant sold food that servers had dropped on the floor."

    CCTV has previously been criticized for offering thinly veiled propaganda as news; two years ago the network's news program profiled the Chinese-built Chengdu J-10, depicting it targeting and destroying another plane with a missile.

    The targeted plane in the video clip was later <a href="http://live.wsj.com/video/cctv-tries-to-pass-off-top-gun-clip-as-real/43EC0FC2-A440-4522-8E81-437EC747D30A.html#!43EC0FC2-A440-4522-8E81-437EC747D30A">identified</a> as being a US fighter jet, and the entire video sequence ended up actually being footage taken from the 1986 movie "Top Gun."

    China has shown a tremendous appetite for Apple's products, resulting in such a massive expansion of the company's Mac and iOS sales in the region that the company recently changed how it reports revenue to highlight the growth in the Greater China region.
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