Microsoft backing off Metro, plans boot-to-desktop mode for Windows 8.1

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  • Reply 61 of 72
    razorpitrazorpit Posts: 1,796member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by igriv View Post


     


    Does anyone actually use the Launchpad? (not a rhetorical question, I am curious).



     


    I do.  I hated it at first but as time passed I started to actually like it.  Keep in mind I don't use any of the after market products like Quicksilver or Butler (I think that's the name) so this was a welcome addition.  Launchpad is especially helpful for resource hungry applications such as Xcode, Parallels, and Lotus Notes (yes our company still uses Notes).  I don't want these icons in the doc because one misplaced click usually ends up with my machine becoming unresponsive for a minute while the initial load occurs.


     


    Now I can just hit F4 type "xc", "lo", "pa", etc. and have what I need.  I'm not saying there isn't a better way, but that's how I use it.

  • Reply 62 of 72
    xsuxsu Posts: 401member
    Just continuing the MS tradition of one good OS followed by an underwhelming/bad OS.
  • Reply 63 of 72

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by igriv View Post


     


    Does anyone actually use the Launchpad? (not a rhetorical question, I am curious).



     


    I do. I don't like having a cluttered dock, so I deleted 90% of my dock icons and use the launcher for my less-used apps.

  • Reply 64 of 72
    storneostorneo Posts: 101member
    I knew Metro would never fly on desktops and laptops. And trying to get tablets to perform like a laptop is ridiculous too. Microsoft thinks they can create one solution for every type of device, but it's just not possible. Until they realise this, they will continually fail.
  • Reply 65 of 72
    sockrolidsockrolid Posts: 2,789member
    I bet Microsoft and Ballmer are filled with a sense of relief.
    They've checked "mobile computing" off their to-do list.
    Been there, done that, failed yet again, but they don't care.

    Now they can go back to their core competency: milking legacy corporate IT.
  • Reply 66 of 72
    Dmint. I still use the worst os out their from an article I read somewhere... Vista and win8.
  • Reply 67 of 72
    razorpitrazorpit Posts: 1,796member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SCProfessor View Post



    Dmint. I still use the worst os out their from an article I read somewhere... Vista and win8.


     


    Professor you're too smart for me, I have no idea what you just said...  :-)

  • Reply 68 of 72
    razorpit wrote: »
    Professor you're too smart for me, I have no idea what you just said...  :-)

    No just too dumb for my own sakes. But apple os may be the better system, but I can still mess around from the DOS days.
  • Reply 69 of 72
    nikon133nikon133 Posts: 2,600member
    frxntier wrote: »
    Windows is so big and clunky. Take a look at basic stuff. Want to change your screen saver? Here's a Windows 95 dialog to do it. The Windows control panel is the most difficult monolith to navigate, with its mixed interfaces, some dating back over 15 years. By comparison, look at OS X. System preferences is light and compact, and everything stays in one neat window. Microsoft keeps adding new interfaces so that the OS looks like an old house that's been renovated too many times. They need to rip it down and rebuild it.

    Um... last time this was discussed, it turned out Win 8 is taking pretty much the same space as latest OSX.

    In addition, to change screen saver or wallpaper on Win 8, you right-click on desktop and select "Personalize". You don't need Control Panel for that.

    Yeah you do get some inherited clunkyness here and there, but a lot of things have received shortcuts in the meantime. Like right-click in lower left corner which gives you pretty much all the admin and config tools you'll ever need in one menu.
  • Reply 70 of 72
    nikon133nikon133 Posts: 2,600member
    storneo wrote: »
    I knew Metro would never fly on desktops and laptops. And trying to get tablets to perform like a laptop is ridiculous too. Microsoft thinks they can create one solution for every type of device, but it's just not possible. Until they realise this, they will continually fail.

    This is really too personal to be accepted as general rule, either way.

    I was a bit suspicious toward Modern/Metro so, when I upgraded my work PC back in September, I made a backup of my Win 7 configuration so I can revert back if need be. But I never did. Win 8 worked well for me from beginning, even if my work environment is quite unforgiving.

    Some time later, I upgraded my personal laptop as well. It worked fine too, so I finally upgraded my personal desktop as well.

    Regardless of bipolar nature of Moders/classic desktop switching, I prefer new Start Screen to Win 7 Start Menu. I always though Vista's and 7's Start menu a bit claustrophobic. At work, all my apps are classic so Start Screen is more or less all I do in Modern. On gaming machine, I do use some Modern apps (NZ Herald, Skype, Wikipedia, ComicsJolt etc) but also use Office, photo editing and games on classic. With laptop, I use mostly Modern apps - email, calendar, contacts with social media connectors etc. Lightroom is only frequently used classic application on laptop.

    Like I said, this works for me just fine. Based on Microsoft recent financial results, it seems I'm not the only one, regardless how vocal opponents of Modern GUI are.
  • Reply 71 of 72
    kikkokikko Posts: 40member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by igriv View Post


     


    I use Windows 8 also, and it's OK, but what ARE the improvements over Win 7?



     


    There isn't any in terms of usability. The entire interface is counter intuitive. Windows 8 is more like Windows 7.1. With the stupid "metro" screen slapped on top of Windows 7 and a few tweaks here and there.


     


    The main issue users have with Windows 8 is the interface. Someone coming off a 5-7 year old PC many users will be completely alienated from Win8. The interface has radically changed, no start menu and all useful functions like cut and paste are gone.


     


    Versus OS X, someone who bought a Mac a decade ago will recognize Mountain Lion, same can't be said for Windows users.

  • Reply 72 of 72
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,671member
    kikko wrote: »
    igriv wrote: »
    I use Windows 8 also, and it's OK, but what ARE the improvements over Win 7?

    There isn't any in terms of usability. The entire interface is counter intuitive. Windows 8 is more like Windows 7.1. With the stupid "metro" screen slapped on top of Windows 7 and a few tweaks here and there.

    The main issue users have with Windows 8 is the interface. Someone coming off a 5-7 year old PC many users will be completely alienated from Win8. The interface has radically changed, no start menu and all useful functions like cut and paste are gone.

    Versus OS X, someone who bought a Mac a decade ago will recognize Mountain Lion, same can't be said for Windows users.

    Excellent point. I also don't 'get' W8. It's the consistency of OSX and iOS that works for me. Other call it 'stale', but I'm happy they way things are with Apple. And that's just my opinion, but funny enough, many people complain about Windows needing to relearn steps with every new version. Fortunately, they don't release a new verion every year. Actually, not that many at all (for me it was: 3.0, NT4, W95, 98, 2000, XP, Vista, W8) Curled toes at every iteration.
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