First look: Google Glass unboxing, setup, and first impressions

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  • Reply 101 of 122
    crowleycrowley Posts: 5,995member


    Straight from the National Camera Association handbook image

  • Reply 102 of 122
    mercury99mercury99 Posts: 251member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post


    Google and Apple have very different incubation philosophies. Apple tends to design and perfect, and it's all done behind closed door until it's ready.



     


    Sure, like smartphone with no copy/paste, non-working antenna or messed up maps...

  • Reply 103 of 122
    crowleycrowley Posts: 5,995member


    Antennas and maps are pretty hard to test when you're stuck behind closed doors image

  • Reply 104 of 122
    mercury99mercury99 Posts: 251member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Crowley View Post


    Antennas and maps are pretty hard to test when you're stuck behind closed doors image



     


    Excuses from QA team not to get fired image

  • Reply 105 of 122
    drblankdrblank Posts: 3,383member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by KDarling View Post


     


    He likely got extra eye strain because he wears glasses that are focused further away.


     


     


    Eye strain doesn't work that way. 


     


    NBC interviewed Dr. James Salz, a clinical spokesperson for the American Academy of Ophthalmology, about Google Glasses:


     


     



    I do wear glasses, so I know. Mine are progressive with three different levels, one for reading, one for computer and one for driving all in one. But they aren't designed to look at something 1 inch away.  Most people do not look at things that close away. Nor do they have one eye focused on two different distances.


     


    You're attacking me on something that is a medical related problem is SERIOUS.  I'll tell you what, go eat a big meal and then go swimming right afterwards.  I wouldn't advise someone to eat a big meal and then go swimming.  


     


    I read a differnt article written by a different eye doctor and he raised other issues, this guy didn't.  The other article I read from someone else just raised potential LONG term problems, Lazy eye was one of them. Obviously, these things won't happen over night and whatever problems that do arise won't happen for years down the road obviously depending on how many hours a day they are worn.  Either way, I'm NOT going to wear something in ADDITION to my existing glasses or get Lasik surgery since one can only do Lasik only so many times.


     


    the other doctor specially mentioned that he DOES NOT advise any of his patients to wear something other than protective glasses from sun, water, flying objects, high speed wind sort of glasses (for around machinery, tools, etc. sun glasses, swimming goggles) and prescription glasses.  Obviously, military personnel might use night vision, but that's not used every day and they have two lenses you look through at the same time.  Otherwise, he saw no need for them to protect or improve your eyesight and other than eye strain, lazy and other potential problems.  But obviously no one has done 5 or 10 year studies to find out if there assumptions are true either way.  Obviously, people need empirical evidence and Google hasn't been testing these things long enough and won't.  They aren't going to wait until 2023 for them to publicly release them.  So the initial people using these are initial guinea pigs.  Oink OInk.  


     


    Here's what you might have overlooked in your reading.


     


    Dr. James Salz, a clinical spokesperson for the American Academy of Ophthalmology, hasn't used or studied Glass specifically, but he has looked at the publicly available materials related to the device.

  • Reply 106 of 122
    drblankdrblank Posts: 3,383member


    Eric Schmidt wears glasses, but I've NOT seen photos or videos of him wearing Google Glass, either with Larry Page. What's wrong, were they advised by their eye doctor not to wear them? Or did their wives tell them they look stupid when they do.?  Sergey is more of a geek, so he'll do anything because it's his idea.

  • Reply 107 of 122
    bmason1270bmason1270 Posts: 258member
    drblank wrote: »
    I do wear glasses, so I know. Mine are progressive with three different levels, one for reading, one for computer and one for driving all in one. But they aren't designed to look at something 1 inch away.  Most people do not look at things that close away. Nor do they have one eye focused on two different distances.

    You're attacking me on something that is a medical related problem is SERIOUS.  I'll tell you what, go eat a big meal and then go swimming right afterwards.  I wouldn't advise someone to eat a big meal and then go swimming.  

    I read a differnt article written by a different eye doctor and he raised other issues, this guy didn't.  The other article I read from someone else just raised potential LONG term problems, Lazy eye was one of them. Obviously, these things won't happen over night and whatever problems that do arise won't happen for years down the road obviously depending on how many hours a day they are worn.  Either way, I'm NOT going to wear something in ADDITION to my existing glasses or get Lasik surgery since one can only do Lasik only so many times.

    the other doctor specially mentioned that he DOES NOT advise any of his patients to wear something other than protective glasses from sun, water, flying objects, high speed wind sort of glasses (for around machinery, tools, etc. sun glasses, swimming goggles) and prescription glasses.  Obviously, military personnel might use night vision, but that's not used every day and they have two lenses you look through at the same time.  Otherwise, he saw no need for them to protect or improve your eyesight and other than eye strain, lazy and other potential problems.  But obviously no one has done 5 or 10 year studies to find out if there assumptions are true either way.  Obviously, people need empirical evidence and Google hasn't been testing these things long enough and won't.  They aren't going to wait until 2023 for them to publicly release them.  So the initial people using these are initial guinea pigs.  Oink OInk.  

    Here's what you might have overlooked in your reading.

    <span style="color:rgb(34,34,34);font-family:'Noto Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;line-height:24px;">Dr. James Salz, a clinical spokesperson for the American Academy of Ophthalmology, hasn't used or studied Glass specifically, but he has looked at the publicly available materials related to the device.</span>

    I see a similar lawsuit that ended the ill fated "Opti Grabs"

  • Reply 108 of 122
    drblankdrblank Posts: 3,383member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Crowley View Post


    Antennas and maps are pretty hard to test when you're stuck behind closed doors image



    I think the big deal is being photographed without knowing.  When someone pulls out a smartphone to take a snapshot, you know what they are about to do since they are being used physically like a camera, which is different than when you use them as a phone or searching, texting, etc.


     


    I can't wait for them to be illegal to use while driving, obviously schools will ban them in the classroom, I'm sure there will be large companies that are doing things that forbid video taping and photographs inside the buildings will tell you to take them off while in the building.  It will just make anyone that owns these forcing them to constantly wear them on/off and it will become, as they say annoying to own. Plus you'll need a protective case to put them in so you don't mess up those nose guides.  One more thing to have to carry around.  I think a lot of concert venues will probably ban them as well.  I'm surprised more and more venues still allow people to whip out their smartphones taking videos and snapshots, usually concerts generally ban people from using audio/video recording devices, since it is a violation of the artist(s) performance copyright to record and make public.   it's the beginning courses of public paparazzi training.

  • Reply 109 of 122
    bmason1270bmason1270 Posts: 258member
    drblank wrote: »
    I think the big deal is being photographed without knowing.  When someone pulls out a smartphone to take a snapshot, you know what they are about to do since they are being used physically like a camera, which is different than when you use them as a phone or searching, texting, etc.

    I can't wait for them to be illegal to use while driving, obviously schools will ban them in the classroom, I'm sure there will be large companies that are doing things that forbid video taping and photographs inside the buildings will tell you to take them off while in the building.  It will just make anyone that owns these forcing them to constantly wear them on/off and it will become, as they say annoying to own. Plus you'll need a protective case to put them in so you don't mess up those nose guides.  One more thing to have to carry around.  I think a lot of concert venues will probably ban them as well.  I'm surprised more and more venues still allow people to whip out their smartphones taking videos and snapshots, usually concerts generally ban people from using audio/video recording devices, since it is a violation of the artist(s) performance copyright to record and make public.   it's the beginning courses of public paparazzi training.

    If they are banned in a facility, you take them off. People take their reading glasses off, their sunglasses off all the time. It just isn't a big deal.

    Why would concert venues ban them over smart phones?

    Might they be a pain to own sometimes? Sure, but I think you are overstating their invasive nature a tad as if cameras aren't already on us in many populated public venues already.

    The Boston bombers were found through security cameras and pictures taken by the public.

    Tweets with pictures of the airline crash by the passengers came out faster than CNN even reported the crash.

    It just a different world now. What we all see everyday has a greater chance to be archived. That can be both good and bad.
  • Reply 110 of 122
    drblankdrblank Posts: 3,383member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by bmason1270 View Post





    If they are banned in a facility, you take them off. People take their reading glasses off, their sunglasses off all the time. It just isn't a big deal.



    Why would concert venues ban them over smart phones?



    Might they be a pain to own sometimes? Sure, but I think you are overstating their invasive nature a tad as if cameras aren't already on us in many populated public venues already.



    The Boston bombers were found through security cameras and pictures taken by the public.



    Tweets with pictures of the airline crash by the passengers came out faster than CNN even reported the crash.


    Yeah, I know most of us will take them off, but we're not FORCED into it.  I don't take my glasses off when i go in a building, classroom, driving.  Sun glasses, I'll just flip up on my forehead.  But for those that already wear glasses, it will be  one more thing to deal with.  I HATE always dragging around 2 pairs of glasses as is and I don't like the one pair that does both,  I like to have at something that looks SOME WHAT stylish.  And I'm too much of a wimp to wear contacts, they have their own set of problems.   it's bad enough using eye drops, I always shut my eyes or miss.

  • Reply 111 of 122
    reefoidreefoid Posts: 158member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by drblank View Post


    I think the big deal is being photographed without knowing.  When someone pulls out a smartphone to take a snapshot, you know what they are about to do since they are being used physically like a camera, which is different than when you use them as a phone or searching, texting, etc.


     


    I can't wait for them to be illegal to use while driving, obviously schools will ban them in the classroom, I'm sure there will be large companies that are doing things that forbid video taping and photographs inside the buildings will tell you to take them off while in the building.  It will just make anyone that owns these forcing them to constantly wear them on/off and it will become, as they say annoying to own. Plus you'll need a protective case to put them in so you don't mess up those nose guides.  One more thing to have to carry around.  I think a lot of concert venues will probably ban them as well.  I'm surprised more and more venues still allow people to whip out their smartphones taking videos and snapshots, usually concerts generally ban people from using audio/video recording devices, since it is a violation of the artist(s) performance copyright to record and make public.   it's the beginning courses of public paparazzi training.



    All of your arguments are based on the assumption that people will want to wear GG at all times, which I don't think will be the case.  Like any other gadget, you'll use them when required.  Need to get somewhere?  Put them on, walk there, take them off.  Want to video chat?  Start a hangout, have a chat, take them off.  Battery time alone will limit how much you can wear them.


     


    I'm still undecided about them.  They definitely will work as a niche product, but whether the GG in their present format is ripe for mass usage at the moment remains to be seen.  However, to write them off as DOA for any of the reasons you've suggested is illogical.

  • Reply 112 of 122
    vmarksvmarks Posts: 720editor


    The pictures are screen captures of what is displayed on Google Glass.


     


    The pictures have Android Back/Home/App-switcher buttons on them because Google Glass was mirroring its display to a Nexus 7. Screen captures were taken of the Nexus 7 display while showing the Glass mirrored image. The MyGlass app negotiates the screen mirroring.


     


    The other way to do this would have been to use ADB over the micro-USB cable. 

  • Reply 113 of 122
    crowleycrowley Posts: 5,995member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by vmarks View Post


    The pictures are screen captures of what is displayed on Google Glass.


     


    The pictures have Android Back/Home/App-switcher buttons on them because Google Glass was mirroring its display to a Nexus 7.



     


    I see.  Figured it was likely to be something like that.  Thanks.

  • Reply 114 of 122
    bmason1270bmason1270 Posts: 258member
    reefoid wrote: »
    All of your arguments are based on the assumption that people will want to wear GG at all times, which I don't think will be the case.  Like any other gadget, you'll use them when required.  Need to get somewhere?  Put them on, walk there, take them off.  Want to video chat?  Start a hangout, have a chat, take them off.  Battery time alone will limit how much you can wear them.

    I'm still undecided about them.  They definitely will work as a niche product, but whether the GG in their present format is ripe for mass usage at the moment remains to be seen.  However, to write them off as DOA for any of the reasons you've suggested is illogical.

    I'm open minded about GG, but I just think that their utility, at least what we know of now, is to limited for the average person to drop $1000 as a tethered accessory. $200? I might bite, but at its current price it is the Segway of electronic gadgets. And, if a Segway was $1000 I'd consider buying one.
  • Reply 115 of 122
    suddenly newtonsuddenly newton Posts: 13,762member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mercury99 View Post


    Sure, like smartphone with no copy/paste, non-working antenna or messed up maps...



     


    Sure, like iPod, iTunes, iMac, iPhone, iPad...

  • Reply 116 of 122
    kdarlingkdarling Posts: 1,640member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by drblank View Post


    I do wear glasses, so I know. Mine are progressive with three different levels, one for reading, one for computer and one for driving all in one. 



     


    Mine are progressives as well.  Obviously we'd need a special pair of GG's with a plain lens up by the video section.  (At least, for me that would work since I'm nearsighted.)


     


    Quote:


    But they aren't designed to look at something 1 inch away.  Most people do not look at things that close away. Nor do they have one eye focused on two different distances.



     


    I used to wear non-matching contact lenses.... one for far, one for near.


     


    Quote:


    Here's what you might have overlooked in your reading.


     


    Dr. James Salz, a clinical spokesperson for the American Academy of Ophthalmology, hasn't used or studied Glass specifically, but he has looked at the publicly available materials related to the device.




     


    Yep, I saw that.  He was pointing out that eyestrain doesn't make you have to get glasses. 


     


    Did you see this, which answered your question about whether or not Google had enlisted the aid of any opthalmologists?


     


    Quote:


    Google provided a prepared statement from Dr. Eli Peli, a professor of opthalmology at Harvard Medical School who has been "offering advice and guidance" to the Glass team, specifically regarding safety and comfort, for almost two years.


  • Reply 117 of 122
    drblankdrblank Posts: 3,383member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post


     


    Sure, like iPod, iTunes, iMac, iPhone, iPad...



    I haven't heard of any problems with Maps in a while, I know Google Maps had some problems fairly recently that were similar to what Maps had. Apple is working on it and there is less and less problems as time goes on.


     


    Copy paste?  I haven't done a copy paste or needed to on anything other than my desktop.  But depending on the app, they do have copy paste in the business apps.


     


    Yeah, like a iMac doesn't have copy/paste.  Yeah, right.


     


    Non-working antenna? Are you sure it was the phone?  I have an iPhone 4, the antenna works just fine.  The cellular site might not be in range, that's a bigger problem.  They take one iittle tiny flaw and blow it out of proporation and dredge it up years later like it still exists. What trolls.


     


    How about Sudden Death Syndrome?  NFC hacks, Processor security problems, dropped calls, battery drain - Seems to me that Android and Samsung have had those problems.

  • Reply 118 of 122
    mercury99mercury99 Posts: 251member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by reefoid View Post


    All of your arguments are based on the assumption that people will want to wear GG at all times, which I don't think will be the case.  Like any other gadget, you'll use them when required.  Need to get somewhere?  Put them on, walk there, take them off.  Want to video chat?  Start a hangout, have a chat, take them off. 



     


    Stop whining, guys. Very soon GG will be embedded into regular optical glasses and sunglasses, so they will be less visible or not visible at all. They will be a normal extension of our mobile devices.


     


    At some point in the future GG-type and Bluetooth-type interfaces will be implanted into human body just like they implant today breasts, hips, and heart cardioverters with computer chip.

  • Reply 119 of 122
    drblankdrblank Posts: 3,383member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mercury99 View Post


     


    Stop whining, guys. Very soon GG will be embedded into regular optical glasses and sunglasses, so they will be less visible or not visible at all. They will be a normal extension of our mobile devices.


     


    At some point in the future GG-type and Bluetooth-type interfaces will be implanted into human body just like they implant today breasts, hips, and heart cardioverters with computer chip.



    God, I hope not. GG is a JOKE. It's too much of a distraction.  I's just a joke.  I'll be laughing when the thing gets banned in so many places that it'll be a waste of time.  Right now, it's a novelty. But novelty products die when the novelty wears off.


     


    I thought bluetooth ear pieces were going to take off, I only see a few people wearing those.  I have a friend that has a set and he RARELY uses it.

  • Reply 120 of 122
    paul94544paul94544 Posts: 1,027member
    the only places it is usable will be out jogging or in the home, it will either be banned everywhere else (all public and military facilities ,schools, colleges, lecture halls, music venues, banks, min 20 feet from an ATM machine court houses etc., cinemas, coffee shops, sex clubs, bars, amusement parks, planes, or anywhere else security and lawyers can get involved) social stigma nerdy looks will restrict it. Another way of looking at it is it will become like smoking: Everyone will pass by and look at you like you are engaging in a filthy nasty habit!
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