Editorial: Why iOS in the Car is a very big deal for Apple

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 77
    laytechlaytech Posts: 136member
    Integration into the car is a natural extension to the apple Eco system. Lets face it, no car software is ever upgraded, other than say a new navigation CD. The only time you get new technology or capabilities is upgrading your car, so make perfect sense to integrate IOS into the car.

    Question is, all car makers will wonder how they can capitalise (make money) from the integration. Charge for upgrades? No reason they can't charge a premium for the "apple compatible hardware" just as they do now for SatNav systems.

    Then there is a question. What about the millions of android drivers out there, how do they appease them? If there is not an option of both, it will be like the early days on in car mobiles where you could only use 1 or maybe 2 phone types.

    We all know apple will bring the best hardware, user experience out of the two but I guess it's the end user that will ultimately want to decide.
  • Reply 42 of 77
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,267member
    Crap no one will use is more important than something everyone uses?

    acatomic wrote: »
    Why call it crap?

    Every time you download a app or make a purchase you'll be using your fingerprint instead of your Apple ID password. Easy and safe to use it will slowly but surely make e-wallet a mainstream thing.

    These things are great until they don't work, and you need a password. If you have to use a password they are no more secure than otherwise, if it isn't 100 percent functional its just useless.
  • Reply 43 of 77
    macbook promacbook pro Posts: 1,605member
    laytech wrote: »
    Integration into the car is a natural extension to the apple Eco system. Lets face it, no car software is ever upgraded, other than say a new navigation CD. The only time you get new technology or capabilities is upgrading your car, so make perfect sense to integrate IOS into the car.

    Question is, all car makers will wonder how they can capitalise (make money) from the integration. Charge for upgrades? No reason they can't charge a premium for the "apple compatible hardware" just as they do now for SatNav systems.

    Then there is a question. What about the millions of android drivers out there, how do they appease them? If there is not an option of both, it will be like the early days on in car mobiles where you could only use 1 or maybe 2 phone types.

    We all know apple will bring the best hardware, user experience out of the two but I guess it's the end user that will ultimately want to decide.

    iOS in the Car will be a premium feature for a few years. The majority of consumers with large disposable incomes overwhelming choose iOS devices over Android.
  • Reply 44 of 77
    normmnormm Posts: 548member
    Or the guy can just wear a surgical glove, using the residue from your last print to gain access immediately.
    Nice try.

    Actually, the AuthenTec technology Apple bought is very cool. It uses a combination of capacitive and RF tech to look at the live layers of the skin, and includes dynamic properties such as blood flow as part of the match. It doesn't use optics at all, and completely ignores the appearance of the surface layer of dead skin cells. Images of a print, residue from a previous print, or even a dead finger, won't fool it.
  • Reply 45 of 77
    macbook promacbook pro Posts: 1,605member
    normm wrote: »
    Actually, the AuthenTec technology Apple bought is very cool. It uses a combination of capacitive and RF tech to look at the live layers of the skin, and includes dynamic properties such as blood flow as part of the match. It doesn't use optics at all, and completely ignores the appearance of the surface layer of dead skin cells. Images of a print, residue from a previous print, or even a dead finger, won't fool it.

    People, in general, greatly underestimate the potential of Apple to disrupt the mobile payment and "Social Sign in." With approximately 500 million accounts, Apple iTunes could become a force in either market overnight. "Social Sign in" would make paying with an Apple account trivial in conjunction with mobile payments and fingerprint identification technology.
  • Reply 46 of 77
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 19,062member
    vadania wrote: »
    The lock on the door and the key is literally just there to give the owner a false sense of security.  ...or "to keep honest people honest" as the saying goes.

    What about the fact that, when opened any other way, it can trigger the alarm? Surely, that must have some deterrent effect, even if slight?
  • Reply 47 of 77
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 19,062member

    What's the potential if iOS in the car drives sales of companion iDevices that would provide in-car/removable entertainment?

    So, the package from the dealer might include:
    • iOS In the Car
    • iOS In the Car entertainment media/storage server WiFi
    • Sharable Cell Radio
    • iCloud Access
    • an iPad for each passenger

    Seems like a potentially source of profit

    Very interesting. I hope it's something like this.
  • Reply 48 of 77
    garth02garth02 Posts: 1member
    It makes perfect sense for Apple to get themselves into the automobiles. Most user interfaces are just plain awful and buggy. I have a 2012 Ford Explorer which uses Microsoft SYNC. One word - TERRIBLE. Its buggy, slow and very difficult to manuever around.

    I am an avid music listener. I get very frustrated connecting my iPhone 5 to the Explorer.

    My wife and I just purchased last night a 2014 Mercedes C250. My understanding is that Mercedes has signed along with other auto companies to work w/ Apple on integrating IOS 7 - iTunes,into their vehicles. I am very much looking forward to seeing what they come up with.

    Hoping that when using the interface on the Benz, it will only requires the software i.e. iphone 5 rather than hardware built-in to the car.

    Time will tell.
  • Reply 49 of 77
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,976member
    LOL! Just watched an old Seinfeld show where Cosmo really could have used that!

    The 'assman' one? :lol:
  • Reply 50 of 77
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,976member
    relic wrote: »
    Maybe for engines and drivetrain but I've never seen a Formula One car with a satnav or radio, must be a different circuit.

    Yea, paddle shifting was on race cars for years before it was available on mass produced cars.
  • Reply 51 of 77
    dick applebaumdick applebaum Posts: 12,505member
    vadania wrote: »
    relic wrote: »
    Biometrics used in a car door mechanism would be a pretty cool accessory.
    Only because it makes it easier for the legal owner to gain access.  If you're not the legal owner, then the glass is pretty fragile and there's even much quicker and less destructive ways to enter a vehicle.  Also, electrically, you can start almost any car in under 5 seconds without the key and disable the steering locking.  The people who smash the steering column to gain access to the wiring are literally doing more work and damage than needed.

    Remote starters make the task of taking a car so easy that you literally look like you own the car as you're getting in and driving away.

    I never have taken a car and don't have a need to but I've demonstrated it to friends many, many times.  As long as cars have an electronic ignition system you will be able to start it up faster than the owner who has the key if you know anything about electrical circuitry.  The lock on the door and the key is literally just there to give the owner a false sense of security.  ...or "to keep honest people honest" as the saying goes.

    Mmmm... Your technological expertise (and possible source of funds) is showing,,,

    just kidding -- good to see that you're out and a about!

    Edit: oops.. Thought I was responding to Relic.
  • Reply 52 of 77
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    dasanman69 wrote: »
    Try answering the question.

    Try having a relevant one.
    acatomic wrote: »
    Why call it crap?

    …safe…

    Because it isn't safe.
    normm wrote: »
    Actually, the AuthenTec technology Apple bought is very cool. It uses a combination of capacitive and RF tech to look at the live layers of the skin, and includes dynamic properties such as blood flow as part of the match. It doesn't use optics at all, and completely ignores the appearance of the surface layer of dead skin cells. Images of a print, residue from a previous print, or even a dead finger, won't fool it.

    I'll have to believe it when I see it, then. I've been raised on technology distinguishable from magic.
  • Reply 53 of 77
    The dashboard could become the next great iPhone or iPad opportunity for Apple. To understand this possibility, you need to see the big picture that is developing.

    There is a big push in the auto industry to get rid of the gas tax as a funding mechanism for public highways and roads. Currently, the proposal is to institute a user fee model based on distance traveled on every road, including locals. One way to collect these tolls is through the use of technology that can integrate a powerful computing platform with on board telematics and automatic reporting similar to cell data plans or wifi. The auto insurance companies are already implementing an early generation of this technology to determine how to price your policy. By collecting data on your driving behavior, they can deduce the risk you pose and the potential for payouts for collision damage.

    So, how does Apple take advantage of this trend? The automobile companies will need a robust platform to help monetize the opportunity. Apple can bring a powerful computing combination of hardware and software to the game. It becomes a win-win proposition for both sides. The car manufacturers solve a problem that they are not equipped to handle and Apple gets a channel to serve up their ecosystem. Of course, Google and Microsoft will want to be players too but Apple has uniquely positioned itself to provide a superior solution.
  • Reply 54 of 77

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by drblank View Post


    Do you not think that fingerprint ID is bad?  As much as someone can copy another's fingerprint, I would use the least used finger, which is the pinky finger on the weakest hand.  By the time someone goes through the hassle of trying to figure that out and get access to your phone, you probably would have wiped it clean ANYWAY.  As long as it takes little time to unlock the phone by using a fingerprint, I'm all for that.  I can't stand typing in passwords, or do I like  retyping them in every time I enter it improperly.



     


    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post





    Or the guy can just wear a surgical glove, using the residue from your last print to gain access immediately.

    Nice try.


     


    The Apple fingerprint sensor doesn't just look at the finger print like you think. It looks at the capacitance pattern of the finger. So, a "rubber glove" or other TV and movie tricks are of no use.

  • Reply 55 of 77
    snovasnova Posts: 1,281member
    Car OEMs have traditionally cared about two things most

    1. Branding. The IVI system must be representative and consistent with the brand image. If they lose control over branding, then they think people wont pay a premium for the factory installed IVI system vs after market.
    2. Driver distraction and safety. They don't get their ass sued if ivi system causes accident due to driver distraction.
  • Reply 56 of 77
    acatomicacatomic Posts: 60member
    asdasd wrote: »

    These things are great until they don't work, and you need a password. If you have to use a password they are no more secure than otherwise, if it isn't 100 percent functional its just useless.

    We'll have to wait and see how functional/reliable it's going to be, butt I'm pretty sure it's going to be on a very high level.

    I have a feeling that some people are comparing Siri to this fingerprint scanner in usefulnes, and that the bad experience with Siri is the reasion where good portion of distrust towards fingerprint scanner is coming from.
  • Reply 57 of 77
    acatomicacatomic Posts: 60member

    Because it isn't safe.

    Well nothing in life is 100% safe, but I believe that this system will have one of the highest degrees of safety around, more safe than credit card or even then the good "old" wallet.
  • Reply 58 of 77
    relicrelic Posts: 4,735member
    Mmmm... Your technological expertise (and possible source of funds) is showing,,,

    just kidding -- good to see that you're out and a about!

    Edit: oops.. Thought I was responding to Relic.


    Oh hay, long time no hear, where have you been hiding? I've been up around for a while now, I went back to work full time at the beginning of 2012, I still have short hair. I guess I'm still afraid to grow it out, that and I like it short. I wouldn't want to wish cancer on my worst enemy unless of course your looking for the ultimate weight loss program as I look great in a bikin now :lol: Both my husband and I have really good careers so we're blessed with a little financial freedom. I don't normally flaunt my toys but this is a tech site where such things can be appreciated, if it's on subject. If I get out of hand with it though just use what you learned in pimp'n school to smack me down to reality.:D
  • Reply 59 of 77
    relicrelic Posts: 4,735member
    dasanman69 wrote: »
    Yea, paddle shifting was on race cars for years before it was available on mass produced cars.

    Aaahhh I hate those thingy's (ever try parking a car using one). Though I agree that Formula racing and other circuits bring many advances in automotive engineering, things like the iDrive where this iOS device (on topic) would hopefully replace, was not invented at the race track but in a department for consumer technology. If we were talking about a new drivetrain, shocks, suspension, engine, composite materials, flippy paddle shifting :grumble:, or even the embedded computer that controls those things the racing analogy would make sense.


    Where is the SatNav, Sat/Terrestrial Radio, MP3/DVD player, air-conditioning controls, rear parking camera display, seat heater controls, ect.
    1000

    Even something like TPMS(Tire Pressure Monitoring System) was first used in luxury cars not racing.
  • Reply 60 of 77
    joeliu58joeliu58 Posts: 19member
    Steve Jobs will ask what is the profitability of the car market. How many car do the world purchase a year? How much can you charge an automobile entertainment system? US$2000 would be too expensive for any car less than a full size car. (Apple sells US$500 per iPad to GM and GM will charge you US$2000!) BUT Apple must sets it foot in the auto business since people listens music mostly while driving. Hopefully iTune will make them money. It would be great if we could be great to have iPhone turns ON/OFF air conditioner remotely or function as a key. A lot of VAR possibility.
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