MOGA iPhone game controller outed, features external battery pack

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
A new, battery-powered "Made for iPhone" game controller from Android accessory maker MOGA was revealed Friday in leaked images on Twitter.

New MOGA controller


The controller features an angular design and features two thumbsticks, a directional pad, shoulder buttons, a pause button and four function buttons in a collapsible design. Twitter user @evleaks, who revealed the device, said it also packs an auxiliary 1,800 mAh battery.

MOGA's gamepad is expected to work with Apple's dedicated game controller framework which the company unveiled in June at its annual Worlwide Developers Conference. Apple specifically named Logitech --?whose controller was leaked earlier this month --?and MOGA as "key partners."

New MOGA controller


Apple's framework specifies three configurations for game controllers: two form-fitting varieties, in which an iOS device sits inside the controller and is directly attached to the device, and one wireless configuration.

The leaked Logitech controller appears to follow Apple's "standard" form-fitting controller profile, with a directional pad, four function buttons, and two shoulder buttons. The MOGA controller shows signs of using the "extended" profile, adding two additional shoulder buttons and two thumbsticks. Both profiles also specify a dedicated "pause" button.

There is no word on pricing or availability for either controller, though Apple promised in June that the first wave of devices would be "on store shelves later this fall."
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 36
    gwmacgwmac Posts: 1,797member
    The only problem with that design might be the fact that most people use cases. It can be troublesome to remove a case just to play a game so unless this will work with an iPhone in a case that may be a big hindrance.
  • Reply 2 of 36
    herbapouherbapou Posts: 2,223member
    "later this fall" is pretty much right now. I am interested in the wireless one to play on an ipad and possibly on an Apple TV later, if Apple release the damn thing at some point in the future.
  • Reply 3 of 36
    Originally Posted by herbapou View Post

    "later this fall" is pretty much right now.

     

    Fall ends December 21.

  • Reply 4 of 36
    herbapouherbapou Posts: 2,223member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by gwmac View Post



    The only problem with that design might be the fact that most people use cases. It can be troublesome to remove a case just to play a game so unless this will work with an iPhone in a case that may be a big hindrance.

     

    I was thinking about that too.  I bet lots of kids will want dedicated ipod touch just to play games with that controller.

  • Reply 5 of 36
    herbapouherbapou Posts: 2,223member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

     

     

    Fall ends December 21.


     

    Yep, but later doesnt have to be on the very last day. Maybe I feel winter is coming because its so cold here today.

  • Reply 6 of 36
    Originally Posted by herbapou View Post

    Yep, but later doesnt have to be on the very last day.


     

    You’re new to Apple and Apple-related products, aren’t you? :p

     

    Maybe I feel winter is coming because its so cold here today. 


     

    We had our first October snow in a little over a decade.

     

    Here, it’s not Fall. It’s Plummet.

  • Reply 7 of 36
    st88st88 Posts: 124member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by gwmac View Post



    The only problem with that design might be the fact that most people use cases. It can be troublesome to remove a case just to play a game so unless this will work with an iPhone in a case that may be a big hindrance.

    I agree.

     

    Other MOGA controllers, such as the MOGA Hero Power Controller, use a clamp to hold a mobile device. 



    MOGA Hero™ Power Controller

    This would appear to be a reasonable alternative for those that want to game but do not want to remove their case.  This goes under the assumption that MOGA creates an iOS compatible controller with a clamp (I can't imagine why they wouldn't).  As well, some gamers might not want to hold such a wide controller.  The clamp style would allow for a close grip.

  • Reply 8 of 36

    Wouldn't buy it for one reason: asymmetrical analog sticks. As someone who never allowed Microsoft stuff in my house (I'm sure I'm not the only one in this particular forum), why would I want my controller on an iOS device to look like an XBox controller? I've always used other platforms for gaming, and their analog sticks are properly symmetrical.

  • Reply 9 of 36
    Originally Posted by scampercom View Post

    Wouldn't buy it for one reason: asymmetrical analog sticks. As someone who never allowed Microsoft stuff in my house (I'm sure I'm not the only one in this particular forum), why would I want my controller on an iOS device to look like an XBox controller?

     

    Because it looks like a Nintendo controller before it looks like a Microsoft one and anything other than asymmetric analog sticks is completely idiotic and a physical pain to use.

  • Reply 10 of 36

    That's subjective, obviously. But you knew that.

  • Reply 11 of 36
    st88st88 Posts: 124member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by scampercom View Post

     

    Wouldn't buy it for one reason: asymmetrical analog sticks. As someone who never allowed Microsoft stuff in my house (I'm sure I'm not the only one in this particular forum), why would I want my controller on an iOS device to look like an XBox controller? I've always used other platforms for gaming, and their analog sticks are properly symmetrical.


    The layout has some advantages.  There are quite a large number of mobile games that would not utilize both sticks, and the symmetrical ABXY buttons would be more comfortable.  Personally I prefer symmetrical analog sticks (similar to Sony's PlayStation controllers), but again that's just my preference for the types of games I would play.

  • Reply 12 of 36
    Originally Posted by scampercom View Post

    That's subjective, obviously. But you knew that.

     

    Strange that you don’t, apparently. And no, I figure everyone’s hands have ten fingers, bending the same way, doing the same things.

  • Reply 13 of 36
    I play games primarily on iPad and almost never on my iPhone. From looking at that little lighting port, I don't think it'll have wireless ability and won't work on iPad...
  • Reply 14 of 36
    st88st88 Posts: 124member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

     

     

    Because it looks like a Nintendo controller before it looks like a Microsoft one and anything other than asymmetric analog sticks is completely idiotic and a physical pain to use.


    'Idiotic' and a 'physical pain to use' is based off of your preference, not everyone's.



    Again, it really comes down to the type of game that someone is playing, and how that game utilizes the different controls.

  • Reply 15 of 36
    Originally Posted by st88 View Post

    'Idiotic' and a 'physical pain to use' is based off of your preference, not everyone's.

     

    Close your hands up.

     

    I rest my case.

  • Reply 16 of 36
    Strange that you don’t, apparently. And no, I figure everyone’s hands have ten fingers, bending the same way, doing the same things.
    I once met someone with twelve toes.
  • Reply 17 of 36
    Originally Posted by Johnny Mozzarella View Post

    I once met someone with twelve toes.

     

    Six digits per appendage is dominant! There’s a community of Amish in Pennsylvania who, through choosing to marry amongst themselves, pretty much all have six fingers.

     

    Neat little tidbits.

  • Reply 18 of 36
    dimmokdimmok Posts: 359member

    Does anybody know the name of the game on the screen in the first pic?

    Bueller? Anyone? 

  • Reply 19 of 36
    This looks very unApple like. Way too much bullshit and redundant features. Here is how to do it:

    - Rectangular controller, same length as an iPhone but less wide. Can be held both horizontally and vertically.

    - One end is a clickable touch pad and the other end has an analog stick. No game today *needs* a D-pad.
    And the second analog is used, in almost any game, for something that a mouse/touchpad device would do much better (absolute vs. relative and springloaded vs. nonspringloaded). Such as camera control or menu selection.

    - The same thing on the back of the controller. Only the stick or slider goes right through the pad with a thumb/indexfinger-rest on the other side. This allows main controls with two or more fingers which gives far better precision (humans pinch grip with thumb and index finger is what gives us our edge in dexterity).

    - Two shoulder buttons.

    - One tactile button in the middle on one side and a home/pause button one the other, also in the middle.

    That would be all that any currently realistically feasible game could want for controls.
    More is just clutter.

    The best option for attaching it to a small portable iDevice would be a clamshell case with a stiff hinge (laptop style) and a gentle padded springloaded clamp for varying sizes due to cases and generations.
    This would be quite thick but much more portable than the long stick depicted, or two separate devices.
  • Reply 20 of 36
    crowleycrowley Posts: 6,065member
    No thanks. Touchpad on one side would screw with the balance and how you grip the unit, not to mention being crap for feedback. Analogue sticks and buttons are much better.
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