Rumor: Apple's next-gen iOS 8 to include 'Healthbook' app for comprehensive health monitoring

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  • Reply 21 of 124
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,716member
    With 3 out of 4 Americans either overweight or obese, I think Apple is onto something here. 
    Yes, and more importantly, and awful lot of Americans, and people of other nationalities, too I'm pretty sure, are over the age of 55. A great many of those people have a direct interest in measuring their state of physical health and for every year that passes the percentage of that group will increase.
    This is a very big deal, I suspect. Not only will it help people in a real way whilst making Apple shed loads of money, it may represent a big health care saving.
  • Reply 22 of 124
    mpantonempantone Posts: 1,939member

    The official name of the feature will be iPochondriac.

     

    ;-)

  • Reply 23 of 124
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by paxman View Post





    Yes, and more importantly, and awful lot of Americans, and people of other nationalities, too I'm pretty sure, are over the age of 55. A great many of those people have a direct interest in measuring their state of physical health and for every year that passes the percentage of that group will increase.

    This is a very big deal, I suspect. Not only will it help people in a real way whilst making Apple shed loads of money, it may represent a big health care saving.

    Good point about the age factor, Paxman.

     

    I would much rather be thirty and 30#'s overweight than 55-65 and 30#'s overweight. Much more difficult to lose the weight once you're old.

     

    I read somewhere (sorry don't recall the source), it's estimated that every pound of the overweight or obese population costs $50 in health care costs.

     

    My MD daughter is doing part of her residency at the County hospital and she says most people she is seeing are obese. Also, most with drug and alcohol addictions. 

     

    I only mention the above because I think the iWatch/apps connection will help people to be more aware of their health.

     

    Remarkably, in 1950, 50% of the US adult population smoked! Now it's down to ~20%. Still too high, to be sure, but a major improvement, nonetheless.

     

    Perhaps we can achieve something similar with healthy food. And stop eating "food-like" crap from the likes of Coke, Pepsi, Gatorade, Pizza Hut, General Mills, McDonald's, etc., etc.

     

    Anyway, I'm rambling! :)

     

    Best.

  • Reply 24 of 124
    iqatedoiqatedo Posts: 1,762member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post

     

    ...

     

    Anyway, I'm rambling! :)

     

    Best.


     

    That's okay, better than a lot of what goes on here. :)

  • Reply 25 of 124
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post



    How exactly is Apple planning to do glucose level measurements?

     

    Perhaps they can scan the Iris and look for discoloration patterns? Issues with swelling and more in the eyes are indicative of glucose imbalance.

  • Reply 26 of 124
    I agree with earlier post. This health apparatus is applicable toa host of healthcare environments, beyond iOS health and fitness enthusiats. Hospitals , care facilities, shut in populations, other populations with a need to be administered and medically evaluated. So the Longview is medical use professional use enlarging the addressable population by tenfold. With IBeacon or iOS it is a tremendous opportunity for Apple
  • Reply 27 of 124
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post

     

    Good point about the age factor, Paxman.

     

    I would much rather be thirty and 30#'s overweight than 55-65 and 30#'s overweight. Much more difficult to lose the weight once you're old.

     

    I read somewhere (sorry don't recall the source), it's estimated that every pound of the overweight or obese population costs $50 in health care costs.

     

    My MD daughter is doing part of her residency at the County hospital and she says most people she is seeing are obese. Also, most with drug and alcohol addictions. 

     

    I only mention the above because I think the iWatch/apps connection will help people to be more aware of their health.

     

    Remarkably, in 1950, 50% of the US adult population smoked! Now it's down to ~20%. Still too high, to be sure, but a major improvement, nonetheless.

     

    Perhaps we can achieve something similar with healthy food. And stop eating "food-like" crap from the likes of Coke, Pepsi, Gatorade, Pizza Hut, General Mills, McDonald's, etc., etc.

     

    Anyway, I'm rambling! :)

     

    Best.


     

    Hi Christopher, hope I can jump in here. Your daughter is correct! You really see a different side of society in county hospitals. Sadly, there is a huge fraction of the population out there that lives terribly.. poor life skills, poor health, mental illness, domestic abuse, substance abuse. Compliance is a huge issue with this population, and monitoring such as what Apple seems to be working on could go a long way towards improving outcomes. Something that hasn't really been talked much about yet is the mental health aspect of monitoring biological functions. Biofeedback and monitoring of stats such as heart rate variability could also be very beneficial. As the ACE Study (acestudy.org) in particular has has shown, there is a direct causative relationship between mental and physical health.

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

     

     

    Perhaps they can scan the Iris and look for discoloration patterns? Issues with swelling and more in the eyes are indicative of glucose imbalance.


     

    I don't think much can be gleaned from looking at the iris. Looking at the optic disk in the back of the eye can give information about intracranial pressure and vessel disease, but this requires dilated pupils, bright light, and a precise angle.

  • Reply 28 of 124
    iqatedoiqatedo Posts: 1,762member
  • Reply 29 of 124
    arlorarlor Posts: 529member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post

     

    With 3 out of 4 Americans either overweight or obese, I think Apple is onto something here. 

     


     

    Surely no APPLE customers are obese! Steve and Jony would not approve. 

  • Reply 30 of 124
    What could be really cool is if you could monitor health stats of multiple i-band through a single iphone. This way you can constantly monitor your parents stats and be alerted if something goes wrong.
  • Reply 31 of 124
    a2gsga2gsg Posts: 26member
    Quote:


     "Deciding what not to do is as important as deciding what to do," Jobs says in the book. "It's true for companies, and it's true for products."


     

    if he were alive today, do you Really Think this is something important that would be decided to do¿¿¿

  • Reply 32 of 124
    I'm still waiting for an SOS button or something on the lock screen for vital info during an emergency if you're unconscious from an accident. i.e. Phone numbers, allergies or current medication.... Seems like a no brainer.
  • Reply 33 of 124
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    Perhaps they can scan the Iris and look for discoloration patterns? Issues with swelling and more in the eyes are indicative of glucose imbalance.
    So basically it's not something we're going to see in 2014. Heck that contact lens Google is working on is like 5 years away from coming to market.
  • Reply 34 of 124

    I'm open to the possibility that an Apple "smart" wristwatch and a "health" sensor/monitor might be two distinct devices. I don't have any specific ideas what they might look like but it just feels that with all the various functions being speculated about there is maybe too much for a single device. Just a thought.

  • Reply 35 of 124
    arlor wrote: »
     
    With 3 out of 4 Americans either overweight or obese, I think Apple is onto something here. 

    Surely no APPLE customers are obese! Steve and Jony would not approve. 

    Cough, cough... That marketing guy and the finance guy.....
  • Reply 36 of 124
    What's up with this thread!? It's actually insightful, funny!

    Could it be because the topic is of no use to the usual list of suspects?
  • Reply 37 of 124
    asciiascii Posts: 5,936member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post

     

    With 3 out of 4 Americans either overweight or obese, I think Apple is onto something here. 


    Another way to interpret that information (3 out of 4 people overweight or obese) is that people don't like exercise. Therefore selling an exercise product is not likely to be successful, or at least if it is successful it will be within a small market.

  • Reply 38 of 124
    chipsychipsy Posts: 287member
    From what I remember reading (sorry, forgot the source) it seems as though they plan to use a microneedle array of some sort that measures interstitial fluid (basically the fluid in the tissue but outside of your blood vessels). Apparently it just feels like sandpaper. Needless to say, if Apple can get the FDA to approve it as a replacement for finger sticks this will be truly revolutionary.

    I wouldn't get hopes up too high on glucose level detecting in the iWatch. This rumor is based on the acquisition by Apple of one of the researchers of Sano Intelligence, a company that is developing a patch that can detect glucose levels. However this technology is property of Sano Intelligence (and C8, but their tech failed in measuring consistently accurate levels leading to the eventual bankruptcy) and doesn't move to Apple because they acquired one (a couple of engineers in the case of C8) of the researchers. If they were planning on using this they probably would have bought a license from Sano, which would be the fastest way of getting it to market, instead of buying one of the researchers. Furthermore this is a new technology and just like Googles glucose lens it still has to undergo years of testing and further refinement before it gets FDA approval (if you build a machine from existing tech it can even take as long as 7 months so...). I rather think they just needed people with a lot of experience in sensors, f.e. that person also developed a patch that measures heart beat, blood pressure, skin temperature, stress detection, ... Stuff like that seems more likely. The glucose patch (just like Googles lens) is estimated to be at least 5 years away from market introduction.

    What is possible is that you manually enter glucose levels so you can keep track of it. Or at most like S Health be capable of integrating with third-party glucosemeters via Bluetooth.
  • Reply 39 of 124
    From what I remember reading (sorry, forgot the source) it seems as though they plan to use a microneedle array of some sort that measures interstitial fluid (basically the fluid in the tissue but outside of your blood vessels). Apparently it just feels like sandpaper. Needless to say, if Apple can get the FDA to approve it as a replacement for finger sticks this will be truly revolutionary.

    Here is one link...
    http://************/2014/01/17/apple-continues-hiring-raid-on-medical-sensor-field-as-it-develops-eye-scanning-technology/

    AI seems to quote sources without giving credit to the sources. Now links to those sources by site participants are being edited. :-(((

    9to5mac was edited out.
  • Reply 40 of 124
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by IQatEdo View Post

     

     

    That's okay, better than a lot of what goes on here. :)


    Thanks, Bro! :)

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