iPhone 5c catches fire in student's pocket, causes second-degree burns [u]

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Comments

  • Reply 81 of 105

    Hopefully she learned a valuable lesson from this-- don't sit on electronics.  Some people need to learn the hard way.

  • Reply 82 of 105
    jfc1138jfc1138 Posts: 3,090member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by winterspan View Post



    And why exactly wouldn't she immediately notice the phone under her rear end and take it out of her pants pocket?

    Because each and every time she did it before that it didn't burn her?

  • Reply 83 of 105
    I love you.

    Brings a tear to my eye, parents doing their jobs.

    Haha. I made them save to get them, too. And wouldn't let them get the 8 GB 4th gen knowing it was (a) too small, and (b) about to be really obsolete. My 12 year old was so proud she saved for a MacBook Air herself, too. (Ok, she was close come Christmas, so I took her money and paid the rest and wrapped it up for her)
  • Reply 84 of 105
    gtrgtr Posts: 3,231member
    starbird73 wrote: »
    Haha. I made them save to get them, too. And wouldn't let them get the 8 GB 4th gen knowing it was (a) too small, and (b) about to be really obsolete. My 12 year old was so proud she saved for a MacBook Air herself, too. (Ok, she was close come Christmas, so I took her money and paid the rest and wrapped it up for her)

    ^^^^
    This!

    The world needs more of this.
  • Reply 85 of 105
    analogjackanalogjack Posts: 1,073member
    Quote:


     ...she knew her pants were on fire...


     

     

    It was probably just a lucky guess.

  • Reply 86 of 105
    jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,922member
    jlandd wrote: »
    No one's saying she didn't sit on it, of course she did.  Again, if all it takes to ignite it is the weight of a 13 year old girl then the back pocket is not the problem and saying just keep it out of your back pocket is not the answer.  
    I highly doubt this was her first time sitting on her phone. I suspect she's been doing this several time a day since she got the device. After a while, you wear out some things and break some more things and hot damn, you burnt your ass.
  • Reply 87 of 105
    haarhaar Posts: 563member
    bah dum bah... any chance her name was "farrah abraham"?... /Facetious

    i thought only samsung phones were a pain in the butt to use... bah bum bah...
  • Reply 89 of 105
    There’s the intended pun.

    Also truthful. For example, it’s not really all that okay to be fat. So when you’re made fun of for it, you change. Worked wonders for me; I’ll never be fat again, now simply because I care enough to be healthy.

    Should’ve seen me back in the day. Spherical. Now with my shirt off you can see my heart beating.

    Spherical—hysterical!
  • Reply 90 of 105
    Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post

    Spherical—hysterical!

     

    Oh, they certainly thought so. <img class=" src="http://forums-files.appleinsider.com/images/smilies//lol.gif" />

     

    Never again, though. 

  • Reply 91 of 105
    Oh, they certainly thought so. :lol:

    Never again, though. 

    Oh sure—I didn't mean being fat was funny, just your description! But yeah, children/brats are exceptionally good at bullying. Glad to hear you won your battle.
  • Reply 92 of 105
    jlanddjlandd Posts: 873member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jlandd View Post

     

    To be sure, these kinds of accidents happen often enough with cell phones in general, and it's not an Apple issue, just a lithium-ion battery one, and none if that hinges on sitting with one in your back pocket.  I'm just saying that the answer really has nothing to do with how she handled it if that's all it took, and I have no doubt it was going to happen with her particular phone eventually no matter what she did, and in the case of a 2 month old phone with all original parts and no modifications we need to stop pointing at her as the cause.  When phone battery fires are reported (Google shows plenty of stories) they're generally never attributed to misuse.  Why are people holding this girl responsible for it, as if she's the problem? 


     

     

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by chazwatson View Post

     

    All of the iPhone fires/injuries/deaths have been because of misuse or faulty accessories.  Cite one instance otherwise.


     

    When I say "It's not an Apple issue, just a lithium-ion battery one" and "When phone battery fires are reported" it's pretty clear I'm not talking about iPhone stats or injury/death reports.  As far as citing reports of non-abuse/faulty accessory incidents, just search 'cell phone battery fire'.  You'll have a harder time finding reports of abused phone incidents than non.

     

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/07/29/galaxy-s4-fire-explosion_n_3672346.html

     

    http://minnesota.cbslocal.com/2013/02/21/students-cell-phone-battery-explodes-starts-a-fire/

     

    http://news.cnet.com/8301-1035_3-57568095-94/samsung-cell-phone-battery-explodes-in-mans-pocket/

     

    http://mashable.com/2013/03/30/nexus-s-explosion/

     

    Never did find a single story about an abused phone catching fire.

     

     

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by chazwatson View Post

     

    This girl broke her phone by sitting on it.  That's a FACT.  And NO, it's not reasonable to expect a phone to stand up to anything and everything you do to it.


     

    No, it's not a fact at all because there's no visible damage to the phone except for the burn.  It broke WHEN she sat, and the story explicitly does NOT state that she broke the phone with her sit.  It sounds as much like it wasn't enough to break the phone at all but was enough to short out the battery.  She certainly didn't physically break the battery by a long shot.  The pop she heard was it shorting, and rather than it being in pieces it's one shorted out lump.  Crushed?  Doesn't look it at all, enough so that one can't draw the conclusion that she did something wrong.  Squeezed and the battery moved is more likely.   Doesn't come off as abuse at all but certainly shows it's unwise to have a phone in your pocket and apply any pressure to it, should you be one of the unlucky .02% (or however many) to own a phone with this defect.

  • Reply 93 of 105
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jlandd View Post

     

    When I say "It's not an Apple issue, just a lithium-ion battery one" and "When phone battery fires are reported" it's pretty clear I'm not talking about iPhone stats or injury/death reports.

     

    Never did find a single story about an abused phone catching fire.


     

    Well of course some random cheap crap phones explode.  What point are you trying to make?

     

    No stories about abused phones catching fire?  You didn't try very hard.  Google search for "iPhone explode" and read one of the many articles including following.  This runner-up for the Darwin award kept using her phone after dropping it.

     

    http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-57598285-1/damaged-iphone-5-reportedly-explodes-injures-womans-eye/

     

     

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jlandd View Post

     

    No, it's not a fact at all because there's no visible damage to the phone except for the burn. It broke WHEN she sat, and the story explicitly does NOT state that she broke the phone with her sit.  It sounds as much like it wasn't enough to break the phone at all but was enough to short out the battery.  She certainly didn't physically break the battery by a long shot.  The pop she heard was it shorting, and rather than it being in pieces it's one shorted out lump.  Crushed?  Doesn't look it at all, enough so that one can't draw the conclusion that she did something wrong.  Squeezed and the battery moved is more likely.   Doesn't come off as abuse at all but certainly shows it's unwise to have a phone in your pocket and apply any pressure to it, should you be one of the unlucky .02% (or however many) to own a phone with this defect.


     

    "The handset was in the student's back pocket and made a "popping" noise when she sat down, reports USA Today. Fire officials tell the paper that they believe sitting on the phone cause it to "short out.""

     

    I think I'll believe the conclusion of a professional over your own, whoever you are.

  • Reply 94 of 105
    I can't find the post, but there is one about lithium battery's being 2-3 times larger will only increase chances of fire.
    Well I think why apples move with the latest iPad (full size) is great ,fact is people want more life out of a battery, so they want bigger, yet more energy efficient is better in multiple ways, 1. This rare problem not as serious, 2.less device weight, 3.better battery life still, 4. Takes less electricity charging etc. as in a portable charger 5. In the end bigger is still a option.
  • Reply 95 of 105
    stop using those unlicensed chargers and cables and you won't have that issue
  • Reply 96 of 105
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by ClaudiusMaximus View Post



    stop using those unlicensed chargers and cables and you won't have that issue



    Where do you get this?

     

    Apple says you can charge with an externally powered USB hub (no brand specified), so that isn't the issue, and I'm pretty sure she didn't have an "unlicensed" cable hanging out of her pocket when she sat on her phone.

  • Reply 97 of 105
    misamisa Posts: 827member
    flaneur wrote: »
    Tightness of jeans, size of butt, other stuff in pocket are also possible factors. Oh, and internal defect in phone.

    Remember that Womens jeans tend to be a "tight" fit, so yes it's entirely possible to crush an iphone if you sit down hard in a chair, particularly if the chair is made of fiberglass or metal.

    Just based on the story, it sounds like she had a longer 5c/5s (here's a danger about phablets and larger iphones) which would be subject to more force if left in a rear pocket while sitting down in a hard chair. Plastic chairs that flex or don't have a lower-back would not cause this problem. It's also entirely possible that she's been sitting on the phone like that all the time and finally cracked the battery.
  • Reply 98 of 105
    jlanddjlandd Posts: 873member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by chazwatson View Post

     

    "The handset was in the student's back pocket and made a "popping" noise when she sat down, reports USA Today. Fire officials tell the paper that they believe sitting on the phone cause it to "short out.""

     

    I think I'll believe the conclusion of a professional over your own, whoever you are.


     

       With all due respect, you're missing the point.  Of course sitting with the phone in her pocket caused it to short out.  But that's all the fire official's statement means.   But if you can't rule out that it the battery shorted out due to mere slight pressure in one particular location on the case and not from the force of the sitting then you can't conclude there was abuse.  And you need visible trauma to the case to go down the path that it was her force that caused the phone to break against the chair and short (abuse) and not her pocket getting tighter from the action, adding what most people would assume to be "within spec" pressure to the phone in the wrong place.  The student's identity is being withheld so likely not much specific info will come.  Is she 80 lbs?  Is the pocket high enough up that something in it barely touches the chair when she'd sit?  Or not?  

     

     

      For the hell of it I checked the pockets of the pants I'm wearing now, and put my phone in it (though I carry it in the front) and when I sit it barely makes any contact with the chair, absolutely not enough to measure an "out of spec" blow even though I'm 170 lbs.  It just pushes it up a little.    All speculation of course, and this doesn't prove anything except that conclusions about abuse are equally speculative.  It's just water cooler conversation.  I'm not claiming to be smarted than any "professional".  But in the case of lawsuits for damages all of these kinds of things come out to puncture holes in assumptions.  

     

    But it seems to most likely be a defect not tied to whether she did this or that, obviously specific to that phone and not the model.  Like I said, if that's all it took to short it out then there are many things that happen out of back pants pockets that would have done it soon. 

     

    Respectfully,

    J

  • Reply 99 of 105

    That only matters if we're talking about a fire while we've got it on us.  A phone can easily get the same trauma when on a surface if a crushing event happens, and it doesn't seem to require a "perfect storm" of events (though obviously we're not hearing stories like this or hers regularly by any stretch, so I'm not saying it's likely).  Back pocket placement isn't the issue.  That a phone getting crushed would ignite is.

  • Reply 100 of 105
    My iPhone 5s, after getting it, crashed to black screen the random
    Code showed up. Started to smoke & crackle then started fire. I recorded the phone with my ipad after dropping it only couch. It wasn't plugged in charging. It had been on about an half hour. Boom this happens. Apple engineers, after five weeks, came to conclusion it was my fault???
    I made the phone crash and show a panic code. So stop blaming the customer.
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