iOS 7.0.6 adoption in North America reached 13.3% within 48 hours - report

Posted:
in iPhone edited March 2014
New mobile tracking data shows that within two days of its release, Apple's iOS 7.0.6 security and maintenance update -- which repaired a potentially critical SSL-related bug -- was already installed on more than 13 percent of iPhones and iPads in North America.

Chitika


iOS 7.0.6 became available to the public last Friday, and even though the following two days were over the weekend and there were no new features to end users, initial adoption was strong. New data published by mobile analytics firm Chitika on Wednesday shows that 13.3 percent of iOS traffic in the U.S. was driven by iOS 7.0.6 just 48 hours after the update was released.

The data is based on tens of millions of U.S. and Canadian iOS-based online ad impressions generated though Chitika's ad network. Those impressions were tracked from Feb. 23 through 23, and encompass both iPhone and iPad.

Chitika


The firm believes it's possible that a majority of North American iOS device users will be using the latest version of the mobile operating system by next week. That would mean that users are updating faster than they used to, as Chitika's data from iOS 5.1.1 showed that it took close to three weeks to reach 58 percent adoption.

As of Sunday, the most popular form of iOS was version 7.0.4, accounting for 54.1 percent. In terms of the latest major iOS release, more than 84 percent of all North American devices tracked are running iOS 7.

A more significant update to Apple's mobile platform is expected to arrive next month in the form of iOS 7.1. AppleInsider has been told that the update will debut in mid-March with a number of tweaks intended to address issues with crashing, and also to speed up animations in the operating system.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 44
    I'm surprised that it wasn't higher !
  • Reply 2 of 44
    gtrgtr Posts: 3,231member
    Bring on 7.1!
  • Reply 3 of 44

    Hi, I'm Jackass Analyst, from Dickhead-Assface Associates. 

     

    I am disappointed at this statistic, because my clients were expecting the number to be 95.4% (our forecasting is based on precise dart-throwing analytics and witchcraft, not to mention an abhorrently inadequate understanding of how Apple runs itself). Therefore, I am urging my institutional clients to dump their APPL holdings, and to buy Samsung stock instead.

     

    I am also basing this notice on information that Samsung is rumored to be working on a 256-core Bassmaster 128-bit chip that will outperform the current A7 64-bit chip Apple currently ships. Although Samsung's rumored chip is slated to ship in 2021, I fear that Apple is behind the curve due to their inability to match Samsung's future specs with present product. 

  • Reply 4 of 44
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by macinthe408 View Post

     

    Hi, I'm Jackass Analyst, from Dickhead-Assface Associates. 

     

    I am disappointed at this statistic, because my clients were expecting the number to be 95.4% (our forecasting is based on precise dart-throwing analytics and witchcraft, not to mention an abhorrently inadequate understanding of how Apple runs itself). Therefore, I am urging my institutional clients to dump their APPL holdings, and to buy Samsung stock instead.

     

    I am also basing this notice on information that Samsung is rumored to be working on a 256-core Bassmaster 128-bit chip that will outperform the current A7 64-bit chip Apple currently ships. Although Samsung's rumored chip is slated to ship in 2021, I fear that Apple is behind the curve due to their inability to match Samsung's future specs with present product. 


    Three posts and already Samsung comes up in the thread that has nothing to do with them. It's a security fix, Apple doesn't get credit for fixing something this major. 

  • Reply 5 of 44
    This is the reason that updates are critical to any enterprise solution and especially to the defense, medical, transportation industries. I wouldn't be surprised if the adoption rate percentage reaches greater than 50% within 72 hours (from now).
  • Reply 6 of 44
    atlapple wrote: »
    Three posts and already Samsung comes up in the thread that has nothing to do with them. It's a security fix, Apple doesn't get credit for fixing something this major. 

    Apple does deserve credit.

    The vulnerability was apparently initially identified on 8 January.
    The vulnerability was resolved in iOS on 21 February in the first update released following the apparent date of the identification of the issue.

    Does the competition resolve issues in such a timely manner?
  • Reply 7 of 44
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by macinthe408 View Post

     

    Hi, I'm Jackass Analyst, from Dickhead-Assface Associates. 

     

    I am disappointed at this statistic, because my clients were expecting the number to be 95.4% (our forecasting is based on precise dart-throwing analytics and witchcraft, not to mention an abhorrently inadequate understanding of how Apple runs itself). Therefore, I am urging my institutional clients to dump their APPL holdings, and to buy Samsung stock instead.

     

    I am also basing this notice on information that Samsung is rumored to be working on a 256-core Bassmaster 128-bit chip that will outperform the current A7 64-bit chip Apple currently ships. Although Samsung's rumored chip is slated to ship in 2021, I fear that Apple is behind the curve due to their inability to match Samsung's future specs with present product. 


     

    Article is praising the adoption rate, not criticizing it.  Not sure what your post is about...

  • Reply 8 of 44
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    This is why I only ever own an iPhone. Apple decides when I get my update not the carriers.
  • Reply 9 of 44
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mistercow View Post

     

     

    Article is praising the adoption rate, not criticizing it.  Not sure what your post is about...




     


    Pure sarcasm ;) For my part, it was funny.
  • Reply 10 of 44
    pmzpmz Posts: 3,433member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AtlApple View Post

     

    Three posts and already Samsung comes up in the thread that has nothing to do with them. It's a security fix, Apple doesn't get credit for fixing something this major. 


    Oh no? 

     

    Somehow Windows is allowed to exist, period. The whole existence of the OS is one giant un-patched security hole and people actually use it, while connected to the internet, for personal data and financial transactions. Insane.

  • Reply 11 of 44
    Hi, I'm Jackass Analyst, from Dickhead-Assface Associates. 

    I am disappointed at this statistic, because my clients were expecting the number to be 95.4% (our forecasting is based on precise dart-throwing analytics and witchcraft, not to mention an abhorrently inadequate understanding of how Apple runs itself). Therefore, I am urging my institutional clients to dump their APPL holdings, and to buy Samsung stock instead.

    I am also basing this notice on information that Samsung is rumored to be working on a 256-core Bassmaster 128-bit chip that will outperform the current A7 64-bit chip Apple currently ships. Although Samsung's rumored chip is slated to ship in 2021, I fear that Apple is behind the curve due to their inability to match Samsung's future specs with present product. 

    This made my evening. Thank you. :D

    It just reads so well.
  • Reply 12 of 44
    clemynxclemynx Posts: 1,510member
    Meanwhile, KitKat is present on 1.8% of Android phones. Lol

    https://developer.android.com/about/dashboards/index.html

    From the same link, there are only 12% of Android phones with 4 inch screen or bigger.
    Even worse, there only are less than 2% android phones with a 4 inch screen or bigger with a PPI higher than 300.
  • Reply 13 of 44
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,732member
    clemynx wrote: »

    From the same link, there are only 12% of Android phones with 4 inch screen or bigger.
    Even worse, there only are less than 2% android phones with a 4 inch screen or bigger with a PPI higher than 300.

    Both of these two claims are incorrect as I read it.. There was a similar discussion about it several months ago here. Several members back then erroneously assumed anything over 4" display must be categorized as "Large" or "XtraLarge". A discussion of how Android categorizes screen sizes is here:
    https://developer.android.com/guide/practices/screens_support.html
  • Reply 14 of 44
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    gatorguy wrote: »
    Both of these two claims are incorrect as I read it.. There was a similar discussion about it several months ago here. Several members back then erroneously assumed anything over 4" display must be categorized as "Large" or "XtraLarge". A discussion of how Android categorizes screen sizes is here:
    https://developer.android.com/guide/practices/screens_support.html

    Incorrect or not Google is to blame for making these overlapping categories. Why can't any news about Android ever be direct and precise. It always feels like I'm looking into a dense fog after having swam in a heavily chlorinated pool all day with my eyes open. It's frustrating.
  • Reply 15 of 44
    clemynxclemynx Posts: 1,510member
    gatorguy wrote: »
    Both of these two claims are incorrect as I read it.. There was a similar discussion about it several months ago here. Several members back then erroneously assumed anything over 4" display must be categorized as "Large" or "XtraLarge". A discussion of how Android categorizes screen sizes is here:
    https://developer.android.com/guide/practices/screens_support.html

    Of course I had verified that page too. Sizes are pretty imprecise.

    Gingerbread is shown as running on 20% of phones anyway. And that's a catastrophe IMO. Google really needs to do something about those updates.
  • Reply 16 of 44
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,732member
    clemynx wrote: »
    Of course I had verified that page too. Sizes are pretty imprecise.

    Gingerbread is shown as running on 20% of phones anyway. And that's a catastrophe IMO. Google really needs to do something about those updates.

    They're doing what they can for the moment. Motorola rolled out KitKat to the MotoX and G less than 30 days after Google had announced it IIRC. Many other updates including security improvements are being offered via Play Services. They'll never have the control that a single seller and OS provider would have.
  • Reply 17 of 44
    I'm sure we'll be updated again in a week or so when the number is up to 80% or some ridiculous number. It's because of the OTA update system combined with the notification that pops up automatically. Does Apple send out the notice in stages so the servers don't get overloaded at once?
  • Reply 18 of 44
    jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,705member
    gatorguy wrote: »
    They're doing what they can for the moment. Motorola rolled out KitKat to the MotoX and G less than 30 days after Google had announced it IIRC. Many other updates including security improvements are being offered via Play Services. They'll never have the control that a single seller and OS provider would have.

    That's what, 2MM phones?

    Back to the topic. My company will deny network access to devices that aren't upgraded by March. I'm sure other companies are doing the same. I want to see what kind of spike would happen this weekend.
  • Reply 19 of 44
    clemynx wrote: »
    Of course I had verified that page too. Sizes are pretty imprecise.

    As a developer I can say that it is pretty smart. It allows developers to create app with a single graphic layout, that automatically adapts to a broad range of display and form factor. It is complex but extremely powerful, it's very similar to HTML+CSS that (if properly used) allows to dinamically resize pages depending on browser window size.
    clemynx wrote: »
    Gingerbread is shown as running on 20% of phones anyway. And that's a catastrophe IMO. Google really needs to do something about those updates.

    I agree.

    This catastrophe is due to a strategic error in Android HoneyComb (3.x) design, reiterated with 4.0.x and 4.1.x. These android versions are not capable of working on very low spec devices (256MB RAM), so manufacturers were stuck on 2.3.x for this category of devices.
  • Reply 20 of 44
    clemynxclemynx Posts: 1,510member
    gatorguy wrote: »
    They're doing what they can for the moment. Motorola rolled out KitKat to the MotoX and G less than 30 days after Google had announced it IIRC. Many other updates including security improvements are being offered via Play Services. They'll never have the control that a single seller and OS provider would have.

    Well, they're not the only responsible for sure. I hear the Galaxy S4 won't receive the KitKat update in Europe! I find this scandalous, really.

    Side note : why does Safari crash on my iPad every time I have two pages of AI at the same time?
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