Next-gen USB 3.1 Type-C connector will support DisplayPort, 5K video output

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 67
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by NolaMacGuy View Post

     

     

    you mean by introducing a brand new non-induction charging system known as Lightning?


    Ha, well I mean for their whole laptop lineup.. not phones. I didn't specify and that was on me. Sorry. :-)

  • Reply 42 of 67
    crowleycrowley Posts: 8,906member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Damn_Its_Hot View Post

     

     

    I am not saying you have not had this experience but I don't think it is typical.


    Maybe "every couple of months" is a bit on the side of often, but...

     

    Apple Store reviews of Lightning cable

    Apple Store reviews of 60W charger

    Average of 1.5 stars for both. Lots of complaints about longevity.

  • Reply 43 of 67
    Originally Posted by Crowley View Post


     

    Whoop de frick. Those reviews are worthless.

  • Reply 44 of 67
    crowleycrowley Posts: 8,906member

    Sure they are.  And so is my Apple Lightning cable, frayed beyond any use, just like many dock cables before it.

     

    Third party cables are much more reliable in my experience.  I recently bought some Juicies, and they seem much more robust so far.

  • Reply 45 of 67
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,322member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Elijahg View Post


    It took Apple ages to adopt USB 3 too. They don't really seem to be able to decide if they're going after the consumer or professional market. More toward prosumer, I guess.

     

    No, it didn't take "ages". They waited until the USB3.0 controller was integrated into intel's chipset, without needing a separate one. Which was the rational thing to do, for a variety of reasons from power efficiency to reliability. 

  • Reply 46 of 67
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,322member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

     

    Sure they are.  And so is my Apple Lightning cable, frayed beyond any use, just like many dock cables before it.

     


     

    Funny how I've never managed to damage of fray a single lightning cable. I guess because I put a shred of effort into not treating them carelessly, and yanking them in extreme ways. It's not that hard to not fray them. 

  • Reply 47 of 67
    crowleycrowley Posts: 8,906member

    Perhaps, but it's a cable, I don't want to have to treat it like a baby.  Plus it's not particularly well built for connecting and disconnecting, it requires a fair bit of force and there's no much grip room round the little sleeve near the Lightning connector.  Other, often cheaper cables are much more robust, that's the point.

  • Reply 48 of 67

    Yes yes but will it allow daisy chaining like TB does?

  • Reply 49 of 67
    misamisa Posts: 827member
    Regarding the MagSafe rumor: I've pretty much decided they are trying to move all of their portables to the new induction charger like the Apple Watch has.

    So they can take 4 times as long to charge and waste twice as much energy? No thanks.

    I'm fine with having an alternative charging system (eg for hotels and airports) but at home I don't want to be constantly radiated by the power required to charge a computer when it will spend 99% of the time spent plugged in anyway.
  • Reply 50 of 67
    g-newsg-news Posts: 1,107member

    Looks like Thunderbolt, much like FireWire in the older days, while originally way ahead of its time, will be reduced to a niche market of very specialist applications in due time. USB isn't bad by any means, but they simply lag behind the industry always, probably because it's such a big and complicated committee. After all it took Apple to take it to market with any meaningful success, although it had technically been available for at least a year.

     

    As long as they keep TB for the professional computers, I'm totally fine with USB only for the laptops and consumer machines. If it means I get a 12" MBA with 5 USB ports for charging, display, peripherals and networking instead of 2 USB ports for just peripherals, a TB port for displays and overpriced or non-available addons and a power connector with yet another cable, I'm all for it. This would even bring the cost down and simplify manufacturing. Just bring it all down to a single connector that works across all platforms and you'll also see devices appear, unlike Thunderbolt and to some extent FireWire, back in the days.

  • Reply 51 of 67
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

     

    Perhaps, but it's a cable, I don't want to have to treat it like a baby.  Plus it's not particularly well built for connecting and disconnecting, it requires a fair bit of force and there's no much grip room round the little sleeve near the Lightning connector.  Other, often cheaper cables are much more robust, that's the point.




    So this puts a different tilt on it -- you want to be able to yank on the middle of the cable to remove it from you iOS device or from the charger/computer. Cables are like any other piece of equipment, if care is taken in their use they can last a long life. I have numerous 30 pin and Lightning cables and chargers from the various devices I have sold to Gazelle when purchasing a new iPhone or iPad. I have only had one go bad in the entire family and that was my daughters when she was 13. She now knows and appreciates the proper care and handling of all sorts of cables (i.e., always plug/unplug while firmly grasping the outer sleeve, the strain relief (thicker part of cable adjacent to sleeve & approx. ½" long is there to protect it from frays) never bend or pull a cable at a sharp angle (90 deg) as it is strain relief not something structural that reinforces longitudinal forces along the cable; the thinnest part you pull on is the weakest area, and never pull the cord and wrap the rest of it around your iPhone).

     

    This is common sense to me. If you want a cable that you can abuse get a 3rd party with extra thickness, insulation, longer strain relief and typically cloth covered. So what if it is the size of a pencil and cost three times what Apple's cost¡ If you can afford an Apple iPhone or iPad then you have money to burn right?¡

  • Reply 52 of 67
    Finally something useful from the USB consortium for once.
  • Reply 53 of 67
    rcfarcfa Posts: 1,113member
    So USB is just doing exactly what Thunderbolt has already done for four years.

    Great going, morons.

    Not the same. Totally different beast to develop a new thing vs. bringing a legacy protocol forward.

    Besides: Thunderbolt does NOT have a reversible plug, only Lightening does.
  • Reply 54 of 67
    crowleycrowley Posts: 8,906member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Damn_Its_Hot View Post

     



    So this puts a different tilt on it -- you want to be able to yank on the middle of the cable to remove it from you iOS device or from the charger/computer. Cables are like any other piece of equipment, if care is taken in their use they can last a long life. I have numerous 30 pin and Lightning cables and chargers from the various devices I have sold to Gazelle when purchasing a new iPhone or iPad. I have only had one go bad in the entire family and that was my daughters when she was 13. She now knows and appreciates the proper care and handling of all sorts of cables (i.e., always plug/unplug while firmly grasping the outer sleeve, the strain relief (thicker part of cable adjacent to sleeve & approx. ½" long is there to protect it from frays) never bend or pull a cable at a sharp angle (90 deg) as it is strain relief not something structural that reinforces longitudinal forces along the cable; the thinnest part you pull on is the weakest area, and never pull the cord and wrap the rest of it around your iPhone).

     

    This is common sense to me. If you want a cable that you can abuse get a 3rd party with extra thickness, insulation, longer strain relief and typically cloth covered. So what if it is the size of a pencil and cost three times what Apple's cost¡ If you can afford an Apple iPhone or iPad then you have money to burn right?¡


    Or, get a cable that doesn't rely on weak sleeves and strain relief, and have a bit of flex that still manage to be cheaper than Apple's, while being more robust.  There are plenty of hardy USB cables around that can be had very cheaply.  That's the point, and it stemmed from an unsubstantiated claim that $25 Thunderbolt cables are 15 times more resilient than $2 USB cables.  Apple cables are more expensive and yet more frail than comparable cables.  Which is why I don't buy Apple branded cables unless I absolutely have to (my MagSafe is looking a little iffy).

  • Reply 55 of 67
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post



    This is likely the Death Knell for Thunderbolt. I'm not saying this to be hyperbolic but with DP and USB 3.1 over a universal connector Apple gets what they wanted with Thunderbolt (single multi-protocol cable that supplies power) What they don't get is Intel lockin. This should be as applicable to ARM based platforms as it is Intel.



    Note that Apple hasn't really promoted Thunderbolt lately other than the Mac Pro and there's no rumor of Thunderbolt 2 displays.

     

     

    Wan't the death of Firewire predicted incessantly from about the time of its inception?

  • Reply 56 of 67
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Elijahg View Post

     
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post



    I’d prefer a $25 cable that I never have to replace to a $2 cable I have to replace 15 times.




    I've never replaced a USB A > B cable, though the USB Micro ones are crap, they're too fragile. The USB Mini are ok it seems. Apple Lightning cables however, I replace every few months... The UV in sunlight seemingly attacks them, and the strain reliefs are woefully inadequate.



    I have a drawer dedicated to Apple adapters, I have more Apple adapters than I any other by far.

     

    Learn to look after your Apple cables and you won't need to replace them.

  • Reply 57 of 67
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

     

    Perhaps, but it's a cable, I don't want to have to treat it like a baby.  Plus it's not particularly well built for connecting and disconnecting, it requires a fair bit of force and there's no much grip room round the little sleeve near the Lightning connector.  Other, often cheaper cables are much more robust, that's the point.


     

    Sounds as though you yank your cables out with no care and cry like a baby when they break. No-one's crying with you.

  • Reply 58 of 67
    crowleycrowley Posts: 8,906member
    Sounds as though you can't read. I don't treat my cables particularly badly, and I'm not crying, I'm just not buying Apple cables. And im still waiting for TS to justify anything he's said with something more than tone-deaf invective.

    But it's clear what party you're in.
  • Reply 59 of 67
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Crowley View Post



    Sounds as though you can't read. I don't treat my cables particularly badly, and I'm not crying, I'm just not buying Apple cables. And im still waiting for TS to justify anything he's said with something more than tone-deaf invective.



    But it's clear what party you're in.

     

    I'm not the first person here to observe that when you say that you don't treat your cables like a baby, it suggests that you are thoughtless in your handling of them. SO that directly contradicts your assertion that you don't treat your cables particularly badly. You say you're not crying, and yet go out of your way to criticise Apple cables. You say you're not buying Apple cables, yet you have obviously used them, so you are buying Apple cables.

     

    I prefer to have a single face, rather than two.

  • Reply 60 of 67
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,425member
    slurpy wrote: »
    No, it didn't take "ages". They waited until the USB3.0 controller was integrated into intel's chipset, without needing a separate one. Which was the rational thing to do, for a variety of reasons from power efficiency to reliability. 

    Apple uses many custom chips in their Macs, ones they've designed, ones designed by Intel, Realtek, Broadcom, Atheros and many more. The /System/Library/Extensions folder has 230 items in, most of which are hardware drivers. Would adding one more be such a terrible thing? Even then, it took Apple 8 months after the USB 3 chipset was on sale from Intel to release a desktop with USB 3. In technology circles, 8 months is an age.
    crowley wrote: »
    Perhaps, but it's a cable, I don't want to have to treat it like a baby.  Plus it's not particularly well built for connecting and disconnecting, it requires a fair bit of force and there's no much grip room round the little sleeve near the Lightning connector.  Other, often cheaper cables are much more robust, that's the point.

    I completely agree. I'm glad Volex make Apple's mains cables. God forbid they make their own; just imagine the PR nightmare they'd have when they started falling apart (and catching fire, giving shocks etc) like the Lightning ones do. The Lightning plug is so well mated to the socket that it requires rather a lot of force to remove. And as you say with the lack of grip room (and that it's super-shiny) it's pretty tough to pull out at times.
    Learn to look after your Apple cables and you won't need to replace them.

    I do, thanks.

    To quote you from another thread:
    To all the poor suckers who have ordered or bought a Plus: thank your lucky stars for warranties.

    So you agree with claims that the iPhone 6 is "flawed" due to it allegedly bending in pockets, the operative word being allegedly. You've not seen it, you've not experienced it, but you are convinced it does happen, presumably without excessive force since you call people suckers for buying them, and don't attack the owner. Why then, do you think Lightning cables can't ever have a problem just because you've not experienced it?

    Maybe these people should "Learn to look after your Apple cables devices and you won't need to replace them."
    I'm not the first person here to observe that when you say that you don't treat your cables like a baby, it suggests that you are thoughtless in your handling of them.

    There's difference between babying and treating normally. It's not black and white. Apple's cables shouldn't need babying. This is especially true when the general public is involved. They often don't understand the fragility of electronic equipment.
    You say you're not buying Apple cables, yet you have obviously used them, so you are buying Apple cables.

    I do seem to recall that Apple's equipment includes cables in the box to use and charge the equipment. One doesn't have to explicitly go out to buy an Apple cable to end up with one.
    I prefer to have a single face, rather than two.

    Perhaps then you can be consistent with what you decide is Apple's fault and what isn't.
    crowley wrote: »
    Or, get a cable that doesn't rely on weak sleeves and strain relief, and have a bit of flex that still manage to be cheaper than Apple's, while being more robust.  There are plenty of hardy USB cables around that can be had very cheaply.

    I've never had to baby a non-Apple USB cable, and I've never had one fail. But Apple ones I am very careful to keep the cable in line with the connector, and store them in a coil where they have no stress. The slightest amount of bending next to the connector and a stretch bubble soon appears next to the strain relief...
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