Teens 'tepid' on Apple Watch as iPhone and iPad steal Android marketshare

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  • Reply 141 of 284
    ... and last for years and years and years and years.

    I have my Grandfather's pocket watch. 90 years old and still ticking. Seriously.

    Well that's great! What does your Grandfather's watch do BTW?
  • Reply 142 of 284
    Originally Posted by island hermit View Post

    I have my Grandfather's pocket watch. 90 years old and still ticking. Seriously.




    Your grandfather or the pocketwatch?

     

    I have my great-grandfather’s suit and ties. Interestingly enough, they’re coming back into fashion. I’m happy that I’ll get to wear them without turning heads in the near future.

     

    It doesn’t make me a ‘hipster’ to wear it, right? Because I’m not wearing it ironically<img class=" src="http://forums-files.appleinsider.com/images/smilies//lol.gif" /> 

  • Reply 143 of 284
    chadbagchadbag Posts: 1,090member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by island hermit View Post

     

     

    Well... I have heard varying rates of success...

     

    ... but I noticed you didn't bother telling me how it works on the 4 or the 3GS.


     

    Why should I have, Apple does not support it.  Considering when the 4S came out, it works very well in my experience.

  • Reply 144 of 284
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Relic View Post

     

    the device is just to small to be of any use other then notifications and quick message glancing.


     

    hmm so a fitness tracker that can stream music wirelessly to headphones while you're out jogging, and allow you to buy some refreshments afterwards, is just too small to be of any value? riiiight.

     

    hint: your own use cases != the world's.

  • Reply 145 of 284
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Roake View Post







    First, I never understood this issue of socioeconomic strata with regard to expensive toys. I am a physician, with a decent income. But I've worked too hard to get to where I am to piss away what money I have trying to impress strangers with new toys. I want to impress friends and family even less; I don't want it to appear that I'm rubbing into their faces that I make money than them. Fortunately, my wife is from the Philippines and doesn't have a materialistic bone in her body; she is quite practical. It is amazing how well you can dress and what nice stuff you have if you are willing to buy clearance or out of season items, or buy from a consignment store.



    That being said, I've been anxious to get most of the previous Apple products. I even found myself buying an iPad I when I wasn't quite sure what I was going to do with it (but it ended up being a very nice item for us). However, with the Apple Watch, I find that I'm only vaguely interested. I can about guarantee that I won't buy the first iteration. Maybe later, when it packs more sensors and has a better battery life (then the reputed ~24 hrs on a charge it now seems to have).



    I do know one thing. While I make a decent amount of money, I would see buying some "socioeconomic status" item more embarrassing than gratifying. I am not nearly so vain and insecure that I have to display symbols of wealth in order to feel good about myself (quite the opposite). As such, I'll consider the Apple Watch only when it offers me something I need. And tapping someone's wrist remotely ain't it.



    you're under the impression that buying tech toys is to impress others? how odd. i buy them to entertain myself. 

     

    as for battery life -- don't hold your breath. battery tech hasn't made many inroads and is largely flat. theres a reason nobody's smartphone does more than a day or so. 

     

    $350 for a bluetooth iPod that can track my steps and workout calories, and serve as a wallet during a run, sounds great to me.

  • Reply 146 of 284
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by island hermit View Post

     

    The one thing that really bothers me that doesn't bother me about my other gadgets is longevity. I expect to replace my phone and tablet. A watch... I just can't see it.

     

    ... but maybe Apple can convince people that they have to replace their watch every 2-3 years.


     

    if only apple had the ability to create a system on a chip that could be swapped out of a chassis... or offer trade-ins for the value of precious materials. damn.

  • Reply 147 of 284
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by JBDragon View Post

     

    I look at the Market for watches in General and it's been a dying market now for many years.   Who stills wear a watch?  Well OLD people do.  But most don't own a Smartphone, just a plain old cell phone.   A smart watch won't do them any good.  my Dad wears a watch at times, and my Grandma wears a watch.  

     

    The other group that wears a watch are those that are always in a suit for work.  Lawyers, Businessmen, etc.  Is that a Market for a Smartwatch, let alone a Apple Watch?  I don't think so. It's more of the Rolex type crowd.  A nice classy watch, not a Smart Watch, which is like the Geek Calculator watch of the past.   That leaves those that dress up for Church, a wedding, a funeral, maybe a Date.    They may throw on a watch, a cheap watch, or a nice watch in the $100 price range that you wear here and there.

     

    I just don't see how Apple expects to sell all these watches.   None released so far have been huge sellers.  Have any of them sold 1 million yet?   I know I can't wear a watch at work as most people here for a number of reasons.  That would leave it for only the times I'm not working.   I don't see why I need to drop $350+ on a watch when I can just grab my iPhone in a couple seconds and spend no extra money.   We just got big screens and now you want to go to a tiny watch screen?  

     

    The Looks of the Apple watch is growing on me somewhat, but it really needs to be half the thickness, but I still wouldn't buy it or any other Smart Watch.  I have a nice fancy classic watch I wear maybe once a year!   It's about a $130 watch I got as a high school Graduation gift YEARS ago!!! 20+ years ago!!!  I've not gotten another watch since that one.  It still works, I've replaced the battery in it.    I just don't see a reason to buy a Apple Watch.  I have my iPhone 6 now.   To go along with my iPad 3.   I have zero reason for needing a Apple Watch.   




    if *only* this device could be used for other things than a dress watch! if only it tracked my sitting, standing, walking activity during my day in the office, or my calories during a jog, while replacing my tethered iPod w/ a wireless model! and allowed me run w/o a wallet should i want to pick something up for myself! what was apple thinking, why doesn't it do these things!?

  • Reply 148 of 284
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by island hermit View Post

     

    I understand people being convinced to upgrade laptops, tablets, phones... but watches at $350 to thousands of $$$ a pop. I'm not convinced.


     

    so you've never upgraded your iPod after a handful of years? ok, even if you haven't, because it still does the job you bought it for -- what stops an "old" Watch from continuing to perform its job? music, activity, wallet. 

     

    thats assuming theres no modular upgrade or trade-in purchase model for the device, which would surprise me.

  • Reply 149 of 284
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by island hermit View Post

     

     

    Well... I have heard varying rates of success...

     

    ... but I noticed you didn't bother telling me how it works on the 4 or the 3GS.




    thats because you claimed "2-3" years, not 4-5 years, a near doubling of your initial statement. 

  • Reply 150 of 284
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by NolaMacGuy View Post

     

     

    if only apple had the ability to create a system on a chip that could be swapped out of a chassis... or offer trade-ins for the value of precious materials. damn.


     

    Sorry... I didn't read that feature on the watches.

     

    I'd be interested in reading about that. Could you provide a link?

  • Reply 151 of 284
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by NolaMacGuy View Post

     



    thats because you claimed "2-3" years, not 4-5 years, a near doubling of your initial statement. 


     

    Okay... I give you that.

     

    So you are saying that the watch will be outdated in 4-5 years?

  • Reply 152 of 284
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by NolaMacGuy View Post

     

     

    so you've never upgraded your iPod after a handful of years? ok, even if you haven't, because it still does the job you bought it for -- what stops an "old" Watch from continuing to perform its job? music, activity, wallet. 

     

    thats assuming theres no modular upgrade or trade-in purchase model for the device, which would surprise me.


     

    It's a matter of function. iPods, iPhones and iPads offer functions that people use continually on an everyday basis. The "want" factor is much higher in my opinion... and I already addressed that. I just can't see the same "want" factor in a watch... yet.

     

    As far as your second point... I call that the iPad syndrome. People are satisfied with their old iPad that functions perfectly fine... so they don't bother to upgrade... therefore a decrease in sales. Not a good thing to happen in itself.

     

    As far as upgrades etc. I thought we were talking about the here and now. What is being offered by Apple on the Apple site. I see nothing yet about how the watch is being upgraded in the future.

  • Reply 153 of 284
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ThePixelDoc View Post





    Well that's great! What does your Grandfather's watch do BTW?

     

    It wasn't about its function. You said that normal watches were costly and time intensive to repair.

     

    I gave an example of longevity. Hell, even the cheapest watches I owned lasted at least 10 years... and always performed the function expected of them.

  • Reply 154 of 284
    Okay... I give you that.

    So you are saying that the watch will be outdated in 4-5 years?

    Depends on the OS and how rapidly Apple decides to evolve it. It could go either way.
    The iPod Classic, for example, went at least 4 years without any upgrade, and for what it was, it didn't really need one. It had a purpose that it was as good at on the last day it was on sale as the first. As long as Apple and customers don't go down the path of "watch = smartphone on your wrist" it should be pretty stable.
  • Reply 155 of 284
    thepixeldocthepixeldoc Posts: 2,257member
    It's a matter of function. iPods, iPhones and iPads offer functions that people use continually on an everyday basis. The "want" factor is much higher in my opinion... and I already addressed that. I just can't see the same "want" factor in a watch... yet.

    As far as your second point... I call that the iPad syndrome. People are satisfied with their old iPad that functions perfectly fine... so they don't bother to upgrade... therefore a decrease in sales. Not a good thing to happen in itself.

    As far as upgrades etc. I thought we were talking about the here and now. What is being offered by Apple on the Apple site. I see nothing yet about how the watch is being upgraded in the future.

    Yet... we see no price, we see no availability, we see no app list, we don't see a lot of things.... yet.

    At want point did we move this discussion from speculation to facts and only the facts?

    Should have told the guys that wrote this article, about the speculative article regarding teens being tepid... and then we could have just done away with this speculative discussion and waited until this time next year to have FACTS on the table. But next year is not this year... yet. :no:

    And yet... fact is you still have a 90 year old piece of mechanical nostalgia that does ONE thing and does it well. You just keep it tickin'.... cool! What a future.
  • Reply 156 of 284
    brucemcbrucemc Posts: 1,527member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by NolaMacGuy View Post

     



    if *only* this device could be used for other things than a dress watch! if only it tracked my sitting, standing, walking activity during my day in the office, or my calories during a jog, while replacing my tethered iPod w/ a wireless model! and allowed me run w/o a wallet should i want to pick something up for myself! what was apple thinking, why doesn't it do these things!?


    It is certainly interesting to watch the media and forum fascination with the Apple Watch.  This is the first "really new new" product from Apple since the original iPhone (I say that as the iPad was certainly a new category, but you could more easily identify some use cases for it as it was more closely aligned with iPhone).  Apple of course is so much bigger now, much more broadly known, and also the blogosphere much more filled with noise makers.  The commentary is off the charts, and certainly seems to be much more tilted to the negative.

     

    I wonder how many persons either on AI, or in general, have actually watched the keynote and/or the video (vs. just a few pics).  Have read the reviews of those at the launch, or who had special access to the Apple Watch, who claimed that it looks much better in person than in a photo, that the attention to detail was phenomenal, and that what Apple has done with the watch bands is "without compare in the entire watch industry" (not just smart watch).  The watch bands themselves represent a tremendous amount of "original" innovation.

     

    Of course no one can claim to truly know how well it will sell (1M, 10M, 20M) in its first year, or if it will catch on in a big way or only niche way.  Given Apple's track record, I certainly am giving them the benefit of the doubt (btw, I think that is the "safe bet" if you are actually waging money:). While its first iteration is clearly defined by Apple as needing an iPhone for majority of functions, I expect it will become more independent with future releases, was well as overall more functional, and smaller, thus opening up more market opportunity.

     

    Value depends on individual, but Apple showed enough of solid use cases & hinted at potential for more, to say that many, many persons could have multiple use cases that they would find "worth it".  As noted, it is a wearable iPod to work with BT headphones, and provides fitness & health tracking capabilities (and works quite will without the iPhone during those times), which is a market for a few million right there.  ?Pay simply by lifting your wrist.  New communication modes, innovative maps navigation with taptic engine, at-a-glance notifications, etc.  And that doesn't include anything by developers, who are just getting started.

     

    Apple didn't show everything either, as they are clearly saving some back for the launch.  Although not mentioned, what about a feature which notifies you if you go a certain distance away from your iPhone, preventing you from forgetting/losing your phone.  What is that worth?  



    I wrote this before, but to say again - never underestimate our ability to want more convenience.  10 years ago most cars required these things called "keys" to open the car doors - but now it is a fob.  It went from reaching into your pocket to pull out the keys, to either clicking a button or just approaching the door.  I am sure there where many arguments along the lines of "who needs a fob when I already carry a key".

     

    I don't know if I will get it or not, but I strongly suspect that I will.  Question is about release 1, or waiting for 2.

  • Reply 157 of 284
    thepixeldocthepixeldoc Posts: 2,257member
    It wasn't about its function. You said that normal watches were costly and time intensive to repair.

    I gave an example of longevity. Hell, even the cheapest watches I owned lasted at least 10 years... and always performed the function expected of them.

    Oh please! Longevity is the 600 year old church clock I get to tell time with for free looking out my studio window. Yet, in all it's glory, tradition and immense cultural worth... I doubt it will ever be able to do anything other than tell time and look pretty. Kinda like your grandfather's watch.

    I guess the main thing that we can say now about the ?Watch is... they should've never called it a watch in the first place... because telling time is probably the last thing that people will be using it for.
  • Reply 158 of 284
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post





    Depends on the OS and how rapidly Apple decides to evolve it. It could go either way.

    The iPod Classic, for example, went at least 4 years without any upgrade, and for what it was, it didn't really need one. It had a purpose that it was as good at on the last day it was on sale as the first. As long as Apple and customers don't go down the path of "watch = smartphone on your wrist" it should be pretty stable.

     

    ... and there is the one word that makes me wonder about its longevity... "depends".

  • Reply 159 of 284
    old-wizold-wiz Posts: 194member
    I haven't even seen a teenager wearing a watch in I don't know how long.
  • Reply 160 of 284
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    old-wiz wrote: »
    I haven't even seen a teenager wearing a watch in I don't know how long.

    But you could also say that you hadn't seen a teenager with pretty much anything before it became popular (MP3 players, beepers, laptops, boys with an earring, smartphone, etc.), but at a starting price of $350 I do think that's a bit steep for a mostly accessory device to an already expensive smartphone.
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