Surging Mac sales put Apple among top five global PC vendors for first time, IDC says

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 41
    john.bjohn.b Posts: 2,740member
    Apple is doomed.
  • Reply 22 of 41
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 3,526moderator
    Market share is interesting as it tells the story of how many new units from each vendors are making their way into people's lives. But what would also be interesting is how long each unit from each vendor remains in use by the original purchaser and thereafter. Apple sells less units, but I suspect they remain in use longer, meaning the share of Macs actually in use is growing faster, through longer lifespan/lower attrition than competing PCs.

    Cumulative Macs versus cumulative Windows PCs through the last two decades would be an interesting chart.
  • Reply 23 of 41
    Yes, pretty obvious to everyone except Apple.

    Now if they'd just add the mid-tower the market's been wanting for years, they'd step right up in the ratings.

    Not another cylinder with only external expansion, either. Just a rectangular, medium capacity machine that is moderately expandable, right to the point where it gets serious, if you use high density memory and a couple of big drives.

    Ok, and it can be pretty, too. :)
  • Reply 24 of 41
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,355member

    Pretty stunning, keeping in mind that these companies sell computers starting from $199, and Apple's best selling computers are in the $1-2K range. If Apple decided to make cheap trash, it would be at the #1 spot by a wide margin. 

  • Reply 25 of 41
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,355member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by fyngyrz View Post



    Now if they'd just add the mid-tower the market's been wanting for years, they'd step right up in the ratings.

     

     

    There's not enough lols for this statement. You're extremely, insanely disconnected if you believe the "market" is waiting for a "mid-tower". Or, you just arrived here in a time machine from a decade ago. Vast majority of people don't buy towers anymore, they're a niche product. 

  • Reply 26 of 41
    bigpicsbigpics Posts: 1,397member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

     

    Wow.  Others is just an amazing company.

     

    #1 in tablets and PCs




    Wiley Coyote (some buddy of Larry Ellison's??) is the major stockholder and CEO.  And their Road Runner lines just can't be beat for speed....

  • Reply 27 of 41
    bigpicsbigpics Posts: 1,397member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by GadgetCanadaV2 View Post

     

    The new retina Air will blow everything out of the water. I'll be buying my daughters each one for post secondary.


     

    Hope so. I'm hanging on for it (and I really badly need a new PC)... ...too bad Intel decided to break Moore's law this year with Broadwell slipping multiple times or we'd already have it. I'm sure it was planned for this years holiday season early in the year and they're just holding off.

     

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post



    Hopefully Apple keeps a non-retina MBA as the entry Mac product. The cheaper MBAs are probably taking share from Windows machines and is forcing OEMs like HP in a race to the bottom.



    Personally I can't imagine they won't.  But then I thought they'd refresh the 5s with an A8, etc.  given that it was the best selling single phone model in the world (right?) right up until the announcement of the 6 line....  ...so obviously Apple's not afraid to be bold in their bets and move on without looking back....

  • Reply 28 of 41
    singularitysingularity Posts: 1,328member
    slurpy wrote: »
    <p>Pretty stunning, keeping in mind that these companies sell computers starting from $199, and Apple's best selling computers are in the $1-2K range. If Apple decided to make cheap trash, it would be at the #1 spot by a wide margin. </p>
    Which they would never do. A cheap model would canabalise the more expensive models and destroy there profit margin and then they'd be in the same pain as most of the other PC makers with razor thin margins. When they can stay the same and enjoy huge margins.
  • Reply 29 of 41
    singularitysingularity Posts: 1,328member
    waybacmac wrote: »
    <p>One could make the case that the fiasco with Windows 8 had a negative effect on PC sales. If so, then it will be interesting to see whether sales will recover if Windows 10 is successful. Going another step further, if Windows 10 is not successful, will the "traditional" PC makers start going out of business, or will there be an effort to develop an alternate OS to Windows and MacOS, probably based on Linux?</p><p> </p><p>Food for thought…</p>
    They may make an effort but the chances of a new OS coming out and being a contender is just as likely as Jobs rising from the grave to duet with Elvis. The only possibility of a serious contender to Windows in the corporate world (excluding Apple) is Google Chrome and that isn't going to happen.
  • Reply 30 of 41
    smalmsmalm Posts: 674member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post



    They just lost 21.8%.

     

    Oligopoly in being

  • Reply 31 of 41
    thepixeldocthepixeldoc Posts: 2,257member
    Market share is interesting as it tells the story of how many new units from each vendors are making their way into people's lives. But what would also be interesting is how long each unit from each vendor remains in use by the original purchaser and thereafter. Apple sells less units, but I suspect they remain in use longer, meaning the share of Macs actually in use is growing faster, through longer lifespan/lower attrition than competing PCs.

    Cumulative Macs versus cumulative Windows PCs through the last two decades would be an interesting chart.

    I agree... however a far more useful statistic that I've been begging for, is one that separates "enterprise/business" and "consumer/home".

    For example: If you take out all of the business PCs that rely on Office productivity connectivity, what do the numbers look like?

    Another example: how many households/individuals have not upgraded their PC or Mac within the last 3 years, since mobile devices have become so powerful. That would include Android and iOS devices vs. desktops as the primary "computing" platform.

    Just HP or Dell's business vs. household sales breakdown would tell a different story, and I bet they have those numbers but don't want them to be known or are being "persuaded" not to release them.

    It sure wouldn't surprise me if Apple had close to or more than 30% of the "home computing" market outside of 3rd world countries, a statistic that none of the other guys have an answer for... and that's what scares them.

    And again... let's not forget Android in these statistics either, which even at their cheapest and most basic config... can be more "computer" than some will ever need.
  • Reply 32 of 41
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,423member
    Market share is interesting as it tells the story of how many new units from each vendors are making their way into people's lives. But what would also be interesting is how long each unit from each vendor remains in use by the original purchaser and thereafter. Apple sells less units, but I suspect they remain in use longer, meaning the share of Macs actually in use is growing faster, through longer lifespan/lower attrition than competing PCs.

    Cumulative Macs versus cumulative Windows PCs through the last two decades would be an interesting chart.

    If you look at OS version share I don't think it supports the view that Windows PC's in general don't have a long and useful life. Nearly 25% of those currently are using a relatively ancient PC with the at least 8-14 year old OS it came with, Windows XP. It 's not at all unusual to see Circa 2000-2010 Win PC's still computing away in dens and offices. They don't fall by the wayside as easily as you apparently imagine.
    http://www.netmarketshare.com/operating-system-market-share.aspx?qprid=10&qpcustomd=0
    It sure wouldn't surprise me if Apple had close to or more than 30% of the "home computing" market outside of 3rd world countries
    IMHO that's not very likely. I don't personally believe the majority of home users willing to pay a few hundred extra for a Mac over a PC particularly when there's no advantages to the additional expense they're aware of. And honestly most casual users are shopping price with no idea why they really should spend more (translation: work longer and harder to pay for it) for something with a different OS they aren't familiar with. If as much as 10% of the home market uses OS X I'd be really really surprised.
  • Reply 33 of 41
    Small correction - memory and RAM are the same thing ;-)
  • Reply 34 of 41
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,299member
    gatorguy wrote: »
    If you look at OS version share I don't think it supports the view that Windows PC's in general don't have a long and useful life. Nearly 25% of those currently are using a relatively ancient PC with the at least 8-14 year old OS it came with, Windows XP. It 's not at all unusual to see Circa 2000-2010 Win PC's still computing away in dens and offices. They don't fall by the wayside as easily as you apparently imagine.
    http://www.netmarketshare.com/operating-system-market-share.aspx?qprid=10&qpcustomd=0
    IMHO that's not very likely. I don't personally believe the majority of home users willing to pay a few hundred extra for a Mac over a PC particularly when there's no advantages to the additional expense they're aware of. And honestly most casual users are shopping price with no idea why they really should spend more (translation: work longer and harder to pay for it) for something with a different OS they aren't familiar with. If as much as 10% of the home market uses OS X I'd be really really surprised.

    At least here in the USA, Macs comprise one out of three computers bought for the home, according to apple. I believe that. The numbers fit. I don't agree with the Marketshare numbers we see. I'm sure they are higher. Both Gartner and IDC underestimate Apple,s numbers so much that if they've done it again now, it's likely over 14% here, and over 8% worldwide. If business is buying Macs at a low rate, even though Mac sales to business has been rising at 50% a year for the past several years, then a good 30% for home use seems correct. Elsewhere, about half that percentage.
  • Reply 35 of 41
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,423member
    melgross wrote: »
    At least here in the USA, Macs comprise one out of three computers bought for the home, according to apple. I believe that. The numbers fit. I don't agree with the Marketshare numbers we see. I'm sure they are higher. Both Gartner and IDC underestimate Apple,s numbers so much that if they've done it again now, it's likely over 14% here, and over 8% worldwide. If business is buying Macs at a low rate, even though Mac sales to business has been rising at 50% a year for the past several years, then a good 30% for home use seems correct. Elsewhere, about half that percentage.
    How do you account for the Netshare numbers tracking OS versions? Mac's certainly don't comprise 1/3rd. I also don't recall Apple ever saying that 1/3 of all computers sold in the US for home use are Macs but you no doubt have a link to that you can share.
  • Reply 36 of 41
    Originally Posted by fourthletter View Post

    Small correction - memory and RAM are the same thing ;-)

     

    Not quite. My memory stopped working a few years ago and it makes me want to ram my car into a concrete wall.

  • Reply 37 of 41
    gatorguy wrote: »
    If you look at OS version share I don't think it supports the view that Windows PC's in general don't have a long and useful life. Nearly 25% of those currently are using a relatively ancient PC with the at least 8-14 year old OS it came with, Windows XP. It 's not at all unusual to see Circa 2000-2010 Win PC's still computing away in dens and offices. They don't fall by the wayside as easily as you apparently imagine.
    http://www.netmarketshare.com/operating-system-market-share.aspx?qprid=10&qpcustomd=0
    IMHO that's not very likely. I don't personally believe the majority of home users willing to pay a few hundred extra for a Mac over a PC particularly when there's no advantages to the additional expense they're aware of. And honestly most casual users are shopping price with no idea why they really should spend more (translation: work longer and harder to pay for it) for something with a different OS they aren't familiar with. If as much as 10% of the home market uses OS X I'd be really really surprised.

    I did not mean only OSX in my guesstimate.

    I was taking into consideration exactly what you posted above regarding old PCs, and a lot of those not being used, and/or being replaced by iOS or even Android devices for most "home computing" needs.

    If those old PCs are turned on less than 10% of a household's computer usage... I don't see why we can't find that out somewhere, and just drop them from consideration.

    It MIGHT even be beneficial if Microsoft knew that break-down themselves. Actually, I think they already do know, and that's why they're waffling with Windows 10... and trying to do whatever they can to get the Surface moving above all else. Even if it means giving 2000 of them away at Adobe MAX and trying to steal Apple's dominance in the creative studios around the world, or attempting to do the same in the education market.

    I'll rephrase my "guesstimate": PC towers, desktops and/or laptops running Windows of any kind or version for the majority of household computing needs, has sunk below 50%; with Apple and Google OS's splitting the other 50%. My bet is on Apple at 30% due to the iPad.
  • Reply 38 of 41
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,423member
    I did not mean only OSX in my guesstimate.

    I was taking into consideration exactly what you posted above regarding old PCs, and a lot of those not being used, and/or being replaced by iOS or even Android devices for most "home computing" needs.

    If those old PCs are turned on less than 10% of a household's computer usage... I don't see why we can't find that out somewhere, and just drop them from consideration.

    It MIGHT even be beneficial if Microsoft knew that break-down themselves. Actually, I think they already do know, and that's why they're waffling with Windows 10... and trying to do whatever they can to get the Surface moving above all else. Even if it means giving 2000 of them away at Adobe MAX and trying to steal Apple's dominance in the creative studios around the world, or attempting to do the same in the education market.

    I'll rephrase my "guesstimate": PC towers, desktops and/or laptops running Windows of any kind or version for the majority of household computing needs, has sunk below 50%; with Apple and Google OS's splitting the other 50%. My bet is on Apple at 30% due to the iPad.

    Ah, gotcha. I had misunderstood. Including any computing device I wouldn't be shocked to find an Apple product in 60% of US households that own a computing device.
  • Reply 39 of 41
    thepixeldocthepixeldoc Posts: 2,257member
    gatorguy wrote: »
    Ah, gotcha. I had misunderstood. Including any computing device I wouldn't be shocked to find an Apple product in 60% of US households that own a computing device.

    I still think what is being actively used is the most valuable information. Just because a household has a Mac, doesn't necessarily mean that it's being used most often.

    Also again... I think the numbers are known as well as they can be, specifically for North America. Most of the good break-downs are surely behind a pay-wall of some kind or other, and it's quite possible that when numbers are allowed to be seen by the public, they are culled at the persuasion of paid clients to tell the story that a client wants to project.

    Everyone knows by now that statistics, even if not manipulated, can tell a completely different story depending on the presentation or the presenter. Add to that manipulative poll questions, and I doubt we ever get really close to the truth of... well... of anything really. Political elections most of all; see the recent scare about Scotland... it looked all wrapped up but the actual counting to independence.
  • Reply 40 of 41
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,299member
    gatorguy wrote: »
    How do you account for the Netshare numbers tracking OS versions? Mac's certainly don't comprise 1/3rd. I also don't recall Apple ever saying that 1/3 of all computers sold in the US for home use are Macs but you no doubt have a link to that you can share.

    Yes, about a year ago Tim Cook used that number, and it certainly looks correct. If Apple has a 14% marketshare here, that means among all buyers, consumer, business, educational and government. If, as we're told, sales to business and government is about 5% these days, then that means the other areas are now higher than 14%. Much higher. More than half of all computers are now bought by consumers. So saying 30% is very reliable.
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