FBI director continues crusade against Apple's encryption of iPhone data

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  • Reply 161 of 188
    djrumpydjrumpy Posts: 1,116member
    The 4 digit passcode can be cracked in under two minutes. Each additional alphanumeric character exponentially increases the possible keys.



    Mere seconds for a 4 digit numeric pin.



    https://www.grc.com/haystack.htm


     


    You have been able to turn off simple passwords since iOS4.



    Good stuff. 
  • Reply 162 of 188
    Since when has the FBI or the NSA been concerned about a legal court order anyway?

    "The notion that we would market devices that would allow someone to place themselves beyond the law troubles me a lot. Comey said. "As a country, I don't know why we would want to put people beyond the law."

    Really? It sure didn't bother the FBI or NSA that they secertly developed sophisticated software to gather and store unlimited data from around the world including the United States. And kept such software secret from various Congressional oversight committees and including almost everyone at the Justice Department. Maybe if they had followed FISA in the first place they wouldn't be in this mess. And no thanks to major telecoms or Internet providers who rolled over and who are just now shedding crocodile tears claiming they had no idea what was happening.

    Take the time to watch the two-part Frontline documentary aired this past May:
    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/united-states-of-secrets/
    to see just how ingenuous Comer's words really are.
  • Reply 163 of 188
    Bet he doesn't own blackberry or Nokia phones. Interviewer should have asked him to pull out his phone and show us what he's using. Bet he watches his porn on an iPhone.
  • Reply 164 of 188
    Well Sunshine, if the FBI, NSA, police, etc. hadn't violated the law and then gotten the courts to look the other way, you wouldn't be in this pickle.
  • Reply 165 of 188
    dunksdunks Posts: 1,242member
    Cloud services do not exist for the purpose of convenient data fishing expeditions.

    If they want access to personal data they should obtain a court order that demands the user hand over their passwords, like they used to before the internet.

    If he believes he is entitled to have back-end access without the user ever being notified then I wholeheartedly disagree.

    We need to be more proactive rather than reactive in maintaining social order.
  • Reply 166 of 188
    Hummm... Let's see... He HATES it that he and the rest of the surveillance state can't tap our phones BUT, he despises the fact that the government has gone too far in it's ability to know everything about us thru whatever means suits them? FU** HIM!!! He can't have it both ways. I'll keep my encrypted phone thank you.
  • Reply 167 of 188
    john.bjohn.b Posts: 2,721member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by DJRumpy View Post

     


     

    Quoting that guy as an "expert" ruins any credibility you may have had...

  • Reply 168 of 188
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    New security features in Apple's iOS 8 platform make it technically impossible for the company to decrypt on-device data, even if law enforcement agencies were to provide the proper warrants. If an iPhone has been locked with a secure passcode, Apple has no method of bypassing that code.

    If he's sincere about only wanting to enter a person's property with a warrant, like with a vehicle or residence, then why he can't simply use a warrant to get Apple to reset an account password, which they can use to access the owner's device directly? But it sounds like what he wants is a backdoor that they can use to secretly monitor people without them knowing about it.
  • Reply 169 of 188
    cykzcykz Posts: 81member
    tlevier wrote: »
    "Life or Liberty" is typically at the root of the most contentious issues the US populace discusses.  As a collective group, we're pretty bi-polar and inconsistent.  Think: "Abortion", "Guns", "Speech", "Privacy", "Drugs", "Distracted Driving", etc...


    It is my opinion that our system of government is supposed to protect "Liberty" above all and where "Liberty" did not preserve "Life", that leftover responsibility to protect "Life" was an individual responsibility.


    We don't send troops overseas to protect "Life", to save future citizens from being killed.  We send them to protect "Liberty", our way of life and form of government, so that we don't fall to tyranny, to a government that will protect life at all costs.  If "Life" were so important, we wouldn't have legal alcohol or guns, and we would speed up our march to automated self-driving cars so reckless driving could be eliminated.  The fact is, "Life" isn't as important as "Liberty" - and the plain reason for that is this:  Nothing protects "Life" as well or completely as "Liberty".

    Sh*t happens.  I hope it never happens to anyone, but that's not a justification to create a future government that slides down that slippery slope and jumps the shark.

    Well said.
  • Reply 170 of 188

    Logging everything (and then allowing access to everything with or without out a warrant) is what got us this far. The warrant should only be valid for a restricted period (and should not be retroactive). Otherwise, no cigar.

    But the mere fact that accessible logs exist poses an enormous security threat and a tempting opportunity for government to break the law covertly.

  • Reply 171 of 188
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by zroger73 View Post

     

    I've seen better makeup on corpses in funeral homes.


    Yeah, I thought that too when I viewed it. :-)

  • Reply 172 of 188
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,985member
    smaffei wrote: »
    Yeah, I thought that too when I viewed it. :-)

    The robot from the Old Spice commercials looks more life like. :lol:
  • Reply 173 of 188
    jfc1138jfc1138 Posts: 3,090member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by palomine View Post



    Um, methinks the agency doth protest too much.



    There's this little point of logic I can't get around...when you turn on a touchpad iPhone you can always swipe to get to the number password screen.



    That password is a 4 digit number or any number, it can be brute force hacked really easily. image



    Am I missing something here?



    I haven't read all the comments here so apologies if someone else has posted this already.



    But that's not the only passcode available for iPhones, there's also a "secure passcode" choice in settings that's a lot larger than 4 digits. Beyond that there's a sequence of lockdown delays beyond a certain number of wrong passcode entries, which increase as the error builds in number leading to a device lockdown that has to be resolved via other methods. http://support.apple.com/kb/TS2446

  • Reply 174 of 188
    Quote:


     What an idiotic argument to compare a vehicle or apartment to a cell phone. Vehicles and apartments can hold physical evidence, cell phones contain intangible ideas and discussions.




    I disagree with your argument somewhat, but now relating it to a safe in my house, or a portable lock box in my car, that would be more apropos.  The reality of it, is you could have some very tangible things in there, that could be considered physical evidence, but the thought that the police think they should just get blanket rights to do whatever they want is appalling.

  • Reply 175 of 188
    They can have a back door fine! But not to my iPhone! If a criminals then yes, ok, but you have to trust people or they will never trust you. It works both ways!

    What gives me the right to go threw your phone, family photos, emails, notes, music. etc? So then what gives you the right by manners not by law?

    I can understand part of it but most of it is ridiculous.

    Here I go, Not so serious:

    Like I said it works both ways or does it? And so GO SHOVE IT UP YOUR ASS! I don't want you getting my 1Password account, password.

    My Twitter account! Not yours! My WhatsApp chats are between me and that person. You'll just be the ultimate third wheel, NSA!
  • Reply 176 of 188
    paul94544paul94544 Posts: 1,027member

    This is why the argument "nothing to hide" is patently untenable:

     

    First "Imagine upon exiting your house one day you find a person searching through your trash painstakingly putting the shredded notes and documents back together. In response to your stunned silence he proclaims 'you don’t have anything to worry about – there is no reason to hide is there?'" 

     

     Second, individuals may wish to hide embarrassing behavior or conduct not accepted by the dominant culture. "Consider someone’s sexual or medical history. Imagine someone visiting a library to learn about alternative lifestyles not accepted by the majority."

     

    The latter one is most egregious. What if I send and receive emails that discuss for example: occult/psychic or anthropological or Rosicrucian knowledge and literature or Wicca . All completely legal and studious fields. Do we really want the government  knowing this. I don't have anything to hide but I sure don't want some conservative small minded bigot who is in a position of power and authority (say at the police dept) having access to my life! 

     

    In Germany they have a saying now called "Massen Politik" which acts a warning to never let the majority dictate to the minorities. It is a fundamental of a civilized culture to have respect and consideration for other who may differing points of view or beliefs within reasonable limits of course (Murder is not acceptable belief). When a majority starts dictating what is acceptable behavior as did the Nazis to the Jew in the 30's you have the seeds of pure evil. This is the reason we must have privacy and the reason why people like CIA director are completely WRONG. There is no way he can guarantee this info won't be abused by people with less than un corruptible morals

  • Reply 177 of 188
    paul94544paul94544 Posts: 1,027member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JBDragon View Post

     

    What they have been doing has been warrant less searches!!!  Just searching anyone they feel like it.   That's against the constitution of this country and it's been getting more and more stepped all over by this government, Obama being the worst yet!  The Patriot Act that bush signed into  law is unconstitutional.  At least it was set to expire, but then OBAMA not only expanded it, it made it worse.   It was for spying on people out side this country, after Obama, it was just outright spying in any and all American's in this country.

     

    This government and others think they just have the powers to do whatever it wants and we the people keep letting it happen.  My phone is a part of ME and private.  You want to see whats on get, Get a Court Order/Warrant for ME and My phone!!!  Otherwise F off!!!!


    I totally agree with you-  At the time Obama was running I asked all my liberal friends. The correct question to ask Obama was "Will you repeal the Patriot Act" I knew of course that would never happen and I told them that Obama (who after all is simply a manager not a leader)  would be even worse than Bush. They all thought I was mad at the time. They don't want to be reminded of my question back then of course because they know I'm right. I still believe the American people are the most naive slaves on the planet on both sides of the Aisle. They actually believe that voting changes things - poor deluded slaves. And another election circus starts again soon with the usual suspects Clinton and Christie -  what a fracking joke

    oh its called "home land security"  for a reason . Protection of the Federal Government from the people of the US homeland. It was always directed  at the US people first and foremost. Where do you think all those people working in the Dept of Homeland Security are actually working? Why is  it folks don't see what is staring them in the face? Its like people walking around with a mind that can't  truly see what is going on! The only persons in the media that did draw attention to this were Gore Vidal (now dead) and the comedian George Carlin dead as well.

  • Reply 178 of 188
    paul94544paul94544 Posts: 1,027member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by DJRumpy View Post

     

    and of course brute force methods are easily defeated by having a lock out after 5 attempts.

  • Reply 179 of 188
    paul94544paul94544 Posts: 1,027member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dhandler View Post



    Since when has the FBI or the NSA been concerned about a legal court order anyway?



    "The notion that we would market devices that would allow someone to place themselves beyond the law troubles me a lot. Comey said. "As a country, I don't know why we would want to put people beyond the law."



    Really? It sure didn't bother the FBI or NSA that they secertly developed sophisticated software to gather and store unlimited data from around the world including the United States. And kept such software secret from various Congressional oversight committees and including almost everyone at the Justice Department. Maybe if they had followed FISA in the first place they wouldn't be in this mess. And no thanks to major telecoms or Internet providers who rolled over and who are just now shedding crocodile tears claiming they had no idea what was happening.



    Take the time to watch the two-part Frontline documentary aired this past May:

    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/united-states-of-secrets/

    to see just how ingenuous Comer's words really are.

    The pot calling the kettle black, the nerve of the man!

  • Reply 180 of 188
    djrumpydjrumpy Posts: 1,116member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Paul94544 View Post

     

    and of course brute force methods are easily defeated by having a lock out after 5 attempts.




    Actually anything with an A7 or above gets this by default but it does bear repeating.

     



    "On a device with an A7 processor, the key operations are performed by the Secure Enclave, which also enforces a 5-second delay between repeated failed unlocking requests. This provides a governor against brute-force attacks in addition to safeguards enforced by iOS. "



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