Apple awarded patent for augmented reality devices with transparent displays

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 36
    droidftwdroidftw Posts: 1,009member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

     

    Bullshit. Microsoft (and others) have a ton of licensing agreements with Apple, so I don't buy your "don't ask for reasonable fees" BS. It's just that some (ie. samsung, chinese cos.) would rather just blatantly infringe and not pay any fees. 


     

    As this topic has been debated in the past and there's no new information to change any opinions, I'm not sure this one is worth debating.  There's a decent number of people on both sides of the argument so maybe a better descriptor would have been to say Apple's history of "controversial" licensing fees.

  • Reply 22 of 36

    This may be a huge advance over Google Glass, with the added advantage of full, wrap around vision and potentially revolutionary 3D uses?

     

    I think this may work by changing the focus of the eye, so focusing at infinity one would see the real world, but focusing at a shorter distance of say 3 to 6 feet, one would see the alternative display image. It is an instinctive function and the eye can instantly change focus from one set of images to the other.

     

    Firstly, in 2D use, it could act as HUD (Heads Up Display). Apple gives the example of using it in a museum, but it could be very useful when driving a car, giving the driver full vision of instrument displays, without taking eyes off the road. It could also be adapted to use with the iPhone or Apple Watch to read messages, emails or control calls etc.

     

    Secondly, it could act as a fantastic 3D display. Each eye could be served with slightly different wrap around images (without any colour distortion). Miniature cameras on either side could record from the glasses to an iPhone a 3D video which could then be played back through the glasses. It could also be used to watch broadcast 3D TV and would be great for example to view sports and music events, giving viewers using the glasses the illusion of being in the stadium. Stereo sound could also be transmitted through the the glasses as well, giving a totally immersive experience.

     

    Such 3D glasses would be brilliant for games. Facebook are working on a virtual 3D system, but it requires a large mask type apparatus with built in screen. Apple’s solution would be much more sophisticated, lighter and easier to use. 

     

    There would appear to be many, many uses and new categories of Apple devices using such technology.

  • Reply 23 of 36

    It’s patently clear that this is a transparent patent.

  • Reply 24 of 36
    I see a future for an Apple take on Google Glass. But with al lenses. Imagine traveling and you look at a sign that isn't in your native language. Your iGlasses have a camera that 'reads' the sign, sends info to an app on your phone and then sends back the translation to your display. Walking directions that even recognize where you are by buildings etc. All kinds of things you could do.
  • Reply 25 of 36
    Google Glass already does this. Word Lens is the app and it has been out for a year already.
  • Reply 26 of 36
    charlituna wrote: »
    I see a future for an Apple take on Google Glass. But with al lenses. Imagine traveling and you look at a sign that isn't in your native language. Your iGlasses have a camera that 'reads' the sign, sends info to an app on your phone and then sends back the translation to your display. Walking directions that even recognize where you are by buildings etc. All kinds of things you could do.
    Google Glass already does this with the app Word Lens and has had it for a year already.
  • Reply 27 of 36
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,245member
    charlituna wrote: »
    I see a future for an Apple take on Google Glass. But with al lenses. Imagine traveling and you look at a sign that isn't in your native language. Your iGlasses have a camera that 'reads' the sign, sends info to an app on your phone and then sends back the translation to your display. Walking directions that even recognize where you are by buildings etc. All kinds of things you could do.
    Like this then:

    Imagine you’re traveling in a country whose language you don’t speak. You look up at a sign — say, a caution marker, or a list of directions. Oh, also, you’re wearing Google Glass. You say, “Okay Glass, translate this.” The words on the sign transform into your home language, so when you look through Glass, you can read them.
    That’s what the new Word Lens app for Google Glass does, and it’s kind of magical. Blobs of translated text appear on the wearer’s screen with perspective intact, the same background color, and a matched font. It looks as though the sign has been reprinted in your own language.

    http://allthingsd.com/20131119/new-google-glass-apps-will-translate-the-world-from-your-eyes-and-other-tricks/
  • Reply 28 of 36
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

     

    If they patent the idea, it falls under "obvious" and should be shot down. Hell, even Hollywood has had that one in forever.

    If they patent a way to implement it, perfectly fine by me, but I'd just look for another, slightly different, implementation... and it seems to me the description here is very imprecise, which should make the patent unworthy.

     

    The Patent System is broken from the point that anyone with a brain can devise things that get patented, and the only difference is that some companies have enough money and time (which is money) to actually patent things. In the end, it comes down to "the richer you are, the more likely you are to stifle competition". 

     

    Note: I don't blame Apple for using the system. I blame the system for being broken. Apple is doing what they should do in a broken system, protect themselves so others don't abuse it to kill Apple.

  • Reply 29 of 36
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by charlituna View Post



    I see a future for an Apple take on Google Glass. But with al lenses. Imagine traveling and you look at a sign that isn't in your native language. Your iGlasses have a camera that 'reads' the sign, sends info to an app on your phone and then sends back the translation to your display. Walking directions that even recognize where you are by buildings etc. All kinds of things you could do.



    Patent this.

  • Reply 30 of 36
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post





    Like this then:



    Imagine you’re traveling in a country whose language you don’t speak. You look up at a sign — say, a caution marker, or a list of directions. Oh, also, you’re wearing Google Glass. You say, “Okay Glass, translate this.” The words on the sign transform into your home language, so when you look through Glass, you can read them.

    That’s what the new Word Lens app for Google Glass does, and it’s kind of magical. Blobs of translated text appear on the wearer’s screen with perspective intact, the same background color, and a matched font. It looks as though the sign has been reprinted in your own language.


    http://allthingsd.com/20131119/new-google-glass-apps-will-translate-the-world-from-your-eyes-and-other-tricks/



    You know, with an iWatch and a small wifi-camera and the processing power of an iPhone 6, you have enough hardware and power to make pretty interesting stuff happen... I think I need to talk to my boss.... See ya!

  • Reply 31 of 36
    gatorguy wrote: »
    charlituna wrote: »
    I see a future for an Apple take on Google Glass. But with al lenses. Imagine traveling and you look at a sign that isn't in your native language. Your iGlasses have a camera that 'reads' the sign, sends info to an app on your phone and then sends back the translation to your display. Walking directions that even recognize where you are by buildings etc. All kinds of things you could do.
    Like this then:

    Imagine you’re traveling in a country whose language you don’t speak. You look up at a sign — say, a caution marker, or a list of directions. Oh, also, you’re wearing Google Glass. You say, “Okay Glass, translate this.” The words on the sign transform into your home language, so when you look through Glass, you can read them.
    That’s what the new Word Lens app for Google Glass does, and it’s kind of magical. Blobs of translated text appear on the wearer’s screen with perspective intact, the same background color, and a matched font. It looks as though the sign has been reprinted in your own language.

    http://allthingsd.com/20131119/new-google-glass-apps-will-translate-the-world-from-your-eyes-and-other-tricks/

    I was just about to reply to [@]charlituna[/@] and mention Word Lens but you beat me to it.

    Word Lens is pretty cool. It's been out for about 4 years on iOS and has gotten better over the years. I remember it being more clunky. I'm not sure if the app itself has been made better, or if it's the faster hardware, or both.

    I just looked and it's cross platform. The only difference appears that with iOS you need to in-app purchase each language pack separately for the otherwise free app. On Android all language packs are included free with the free app, and there do not appear to be any ads. Why am I not surprised. Statistics always show iOS users spend more on apps and in app purchases than Android users.
  • Reply 32 of 36
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,245member
    techlover wrote: »
    I was just about to reply to [@]charlituna[/@] and mention Word Lens but you beat me to it.

    Word Lens is pretty cool. It's been out for about 4 years on iOS and has gotten better over the years. I remember it being more clunky. I'm not sure if the app itself has been made better, or if it's the faster hardware, or both..

    Google's engineers did a nice job improving it? Eventually I'd think they'll roll this up into Google Translate, but just a guess that makes sense.
  • Reply 33 of 36
    A continuing point of irritation about these AI patent story headlines...

    Patents are granted, not "awarded". First a patent application is filed, then reviewed, possibly rejected and resubmitted, then granted.

    "Awarded" sounds idiotic.
  • Reply 34 of 36
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TechLover View Post

     

     

    It sounds a lot like Google Glass to me.  At least that is what I thought of.




     I'm surprised it didn't come sooner... What was the hold up?

  • Reply 35 of 36
    techlover wrote: »
    gatorguy wrote: »
    charlituna wrote: »
    I see a future for an Apple take on Google Glass. But with al lenses. Imagine traveling and you look at a sign that isn't in your native language. Your iGlasses have a camera that 'reads' the sign, sends info to an app on your phone and then sends back the translation to your display. Walking directions that even recognize where you are by buildings etc. All kinds of things you could do.
    Like this then:

    Imagine you’re traveling in a country whose language you don’t speak. You look up at a sign — say, a caution marker, or a list of directions. Oh, also, you’re wearing Google Glass. You say, “Okay Glass, translate this.” The words on the sign transform into your home language, so when you look through Glass, you can read them.
    That’s what the new Word Lens app for Google Glass does, and it’s kind of magical. Blobs of translated text appear on the wearer’s screen with perspective intact, the same background color, and a matched font. It looks as though the sign has been reprinted in your own language.

    http://allthingsd.com/20131119/new-google-glass-apps-will-translate-the-world-from-your-eyes-and-other-tricks/

    I was just about to reply to [@]charlituna[/@] and mention Word Lens but you beat me to it.

    Word Lens is pretty cool. It's been out for about 4 years on iOS and has gotten better over the years. I remember it being more clunky. I'm not sure if the app itself has been made better, or if it's the faster hardware, or both.

    I just looked and it's cross platform. The only difference appears that with iOS you need to in-app purchase each language pack separately for the otherwise free app. On Android all language packs are included free with the free app, and there do not appear to be any ads. Why am I not surprised. Statistics always show iOS users spend more on apps and in app purchases than Android users.
    Your post is saying that iOS user are getting ripped off compared to android users. :(
  • Reply 36 of 36

    Futuristic!

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