MythBusters explain the science behind Corning's new shatter-resistant Gorilla Glass 4

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 36
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post

     

     

     

    Hundreds of times a day? Hardly. At any rate, my watch still has a scratch-free surface.




    maybe your watch has a sapphire window ( or crystal as some watch makers like to call it)

  • Reply 22 of 36

    Thoroughly enjoyed this video. Learned a lot. It's an advertisement, but really well done. Hats off to Corning.

     

    BTW: this is the second video of two. The first video set's things up a bit more, gives a neat history of glass, and demonstrates an incredible flexible glass. I highly recommend watching it.  I watched them in the wrong order - but it didn't matter.  Awesomeness.

  • Reply 23 of 36
    bageljoey wrote: »
    So GG4 isn't in the iPhone6? Or Corning just got arround to announcing it?
    Nope, just the apple modified gg3.
    Seems funny that sapphire is considered so important for a watch.

    In all the decades I've owned a watch, I don't recall ever dropping it.
    1.thats not the point, Sapphire actually is easier to break.
    2.it can happen

    Hundreds of times a day? Hardly. At any rate, my watch still has a scratch-free surface.
    should see my watch, about a year and 1/4 old and there are points where you couldn't read through the scratches.
  • Reply 24 of 36
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,454member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Sprint3GIssues View Post



    It's not about shattering, it's about scratching. The hundreds of times a day that your wrist incidentally comes into contact with other surfaces.



    Which is why it's a complete mystery that the Sport Watch -- the one that is most likely to take some serious impacts, is the one they make out of the less scratch resistant Gorilla glass. Cheaper yes, so I guess you'll be able to afford a replacement sooner when the crystal gets so damaged you can't see your watch face. 

  • Reply 25 of 36
    I wonder how much it costs to have these guys advertise the features of my product, masquerading as an episode of MythBusters?
  • Reply 26 of 36
    Seems funny that sapphire is considered so important for a watch.

    In all the decades I've owned a watch, I don't recall ever dropping it.

    "Seems funny that airbags and seatbelt are considered so important for a car.

    In all the decades I've owned a car, I don't recall ever crashing it."


    Same flawgic.
  • Reply 27 of 36
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,001member
    solipsismy wrote: »
    1) I understand why Corning doesn't mention Apple since Apple doesn't like to advertise their component vendors in their products, but since it's because of Steve Jobs that Corning ever made GG into a viable product so I was half-expecting some mention somewhere.

    I believe that SJ sped up the inevitable, but a mention would still be nice.
  • Reply 28 of 36
    Seems funny that sapphire is considered so important for a watch.

    In all the decades I've owned a watch, I don't recall ever dropping it.

    "Seems funny that airbags and seatbelt are considered so important for a car.

    In all the decades I've owned a car, I don't recall ever crashing it."


    Same flawgic.

    Maybe my watch has a crystal/sapphire face. I don't know.

    At any rate, it's highly unlikely that anyone will drop their watch. I guess you could scuff it, but I always took mine off for sports.
  • Reply 29 of 36
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post





    Lol! I love looking up new words.



    I'm sure my watch has some fine scratches, but nothing that detracts from its elegance and readability.



    I should have made this reference instead! :embarrass

  • Reply 30 of 36
    What the hell man! Glass scratches!!!
    Devices like cellphones are susceptible to drops which can lead to your freaking display scratching. There ain't no miracle glass that will withstand scratches. Hell, a flipping car's windshield even gets scratched. I'm so sick and tired of these bs argument and drop test...
    This reminds me of that phony debate over weather iPad's screen was good enough to read from. Really!
    Hell, we read text books in the sun with all that uv. Hello! For millennium we have seen with tons of uv. We have seen a T Rex to a nice rack of t*ts, in the sun.
    Do me a favor and SHUT THE FRONT DOOR!
  • Reply 31 of 36
    lilgto64lilgto64 Posts: 1,147member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Go Faster View Post

     

    So, Why is the windshield NOT made out of Gorilla Glass inside and out? Oh, I forgot. The Insurance Companies will lose MILLIONS in glass claims.




    Perhaps someday they will be - but for now I'd imagine the primary reason is the cost of production. If the cost to make only the inside layer of Gorilla Glass is even double the cost of traditional glass and that translates to an overall fuel economy improvement that only just offsets the additional cost that leave only the possibility of less fractured glass on the inside under less than catastrophic events as a selling point. 

     

    I am not sure how insurance companies would lose millions in glass claims since to my knowledge many (most? all?) will repair chips at least at no cost, with no deductible, and possibly even full replacement. So where is the profit? 

     

    The real reasons we have not seen this in a finished automobile most likely have more to do with testing to meet government regulations, and working out deals with manufacturers, either at the component supplier level or at the assembly plant level and nothing at all to do with the potential impact on insurance claims. 

  • Reply 32 of 36



    Note: It's ion exchange (positively charged nuclei), not electron exchange. 

     

    Reminds me of work on ion bombardment to harden surfaces back when I was a graduate student.

     

    BB

  • Reply 33 of 36
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Go Faster View Post

     

    So, Why is the windshield NOT made out of Gorilla Glass inside and out? Oh, I forgot. The Insurance Companies will lose MILLIONS in glass claims.




    Windshields use a similar technology using a thermal based method to compress the surface regions of the glass [edit]. Chemical methods work better and produce stronger glass but are much more expensive to apply. The basic technology is very old, we learned about it 35 years ago in Glass Science class and even made some. Breaking them is spectacular, the entire bar of glass goes to dust. I am sure Corning has improved the process to make things better than what we did 35 years a go. I think it was the Corning guys, but may have been another group, came to visit and applied the chemical strengthening to glass ceramics, not clear so no good for phones, but they got tensile strengths over 400,000 psi (2.8 GPa), which was very impressive.

     

    Edit. Watched the video, modern windshields use laminated glass not tempered, not sure if it is also tempered these days or not.  Been a long time since glass science class.

  • Reply 34 of 36
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,001member
    go faster wrote: »
    So, Why is the windshield NOT made out of Gorilla Glass inside and out? Oh, I forgot. The Insurance Companies will lose MILLIONS in glass claims.

    Huh? Last I checked insurance companies pay out claims. They'll save money not lose.
  • Reply 35 of 36
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by maccherry View Post



    What the hell man! Glass scratches!!!

    Devices like cellphones are susceptible to drops which can lead to your freaking display scratching. There ain't no miracle glass that will withstand scratches. Hell, a flipping car's windshield even gets scratched. I'm so sick and tired of these bs argument and drop test...

    This reminds me of that phony debate over weather iPad's screen was good enough to read from. Really!

    Hell, we read text books in the sun with all that uv. Hello! For millennium we have seen with tons of uv. We have seen a T Rex to a nice rack of t*ts, in the sun.

    Do me a favor and SHUT THE FRONT DOOR!



    Scratching is very simple.  If something is two things come into contact, the harder thing scratches the softer thing.  This is why Diamond doesn't scratch. There are indices of hardness measure (i.e. Mohs scale. I'm sure there are more relevant ones) – simply put, make the glass harder and more common things (keys, rocks) won't scratch it, though a diamond coated ice pick still would.

     

    ?I've never seen a windshield scratched, though I'm sure it could be.  Cracking is, of course, a different matter.

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