Apple mass transit system for Maps detailed in new patent

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 42
    mpantonempantone Posts: 1,939member

    Sounds useful, particularly in the USA where mass transit systems frequently do not run on time. The actual mass transit schedules are usually easy to understand, it's the delays that wreak havoc (your bus is late, causing you to miss a specific train).

     

    For a typical daily commute, the route map isn't all that useful; it is more useful when you have to go someplace that isn't along your normal route or if you are traveling (out of town).

  • Reply 22 of 42
    john.bjohn.b Posts: 2,740member

    I'll believe it when I see it.

  • Reply 23 of 42
    wigginwiggin Posts: 2,265member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post





    I agree. My 9 yr old son is a master with the NYC subway map. There's an app called Embark NYC that has subway schedules, and is updated to show delays, or temporary reroute

     

    That's great for your home town, but I don't want to have to download a separate app for each city I go to. For that matter, even for my home town, I don't want to have to go to one app to see what a public transit route/time is, then check another for how long it would take to just drive/cab, or bike, or walk even. Apple's Maps has two modes of transportation included, seems logical that it should include transit.

     

    If I want to get from point A to point B, I just want to enter my destination address once and see all my options. (And not to ignite a firestorm, but I still find for the places I travel that Google's map data is better and more useful than Apple's.)

  • Reply 24 of 42
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    They need to eliminate some more businesses as well. I actually somewhat agree with Ben Thompson's latest, he wants Apple to dump iWork and iLife entirely, as well as some other elements, to help focus on the big issues (i.e. iCloud).

    Yep I'm with Ben Thompson. Disband or spinoff the 1st party software. And bring someone in to run their cloud business. It's so important and I'm just not sure Eddy Cue is the right guy for that job (plus he has a lot on his plate outside of that).
  • Reply 25 of 42
    I actually somewhat agree with Ben Thompson's latest, he wants Apple to dump iWork and iLife entirely, as well as some other elements, to help focus on the big issues (i.e. iCloud).

    I agree they need to have more focus on iCloud, but not at the expense of the apps formerly of the iWork and iLife suites. These are pinnacle to iCloud and my user experience would be severely diminished which could lead me to consider not using Macs and iDevices as a single platform if my data wasn't so easily synced and transferable to via these iCloud apps.

    What I suggest is Apple restructure their SW teams and add more people. I think Apple still sees itself as a start up, which is fine, until you can't change your stride when you have a large and complex project spanning multiple OSes.
  • Reply 26 of 42
    rogifan wrote: »
    And bring someone in to run their cloud business.

    Micrsoft? Oracle? Google? Who do you think could make iOS and Mac OS integrate better than Apple?
  • Reply 27 of 42
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post



    I really have to suspect that AppleInsiders claim here that such a feature is in hot demand. I really don't see it as that big of a deal. Mass transit systems really aren't that hard to figure out really, it isn't like the rails get moved around on a regular basis. Even if we talk buses here they still run very fixed schedules.



    Beyond all of that the vast majority of people using mass transit are at best lemmings anyways, recycling the same route day after day after day after day. If you can run your schedule in your sleep why would you need an app?



    Mass transit in big US cities really doesn't work the way you describe it, especially with inclement weather. Buses are early and late and so are trains. The NYC MTA is more robust with the ability to multi-track, much more than WMATA in DC which has to single track if there is an issue with a train resulting which can throw every train on that line or crosses that track out schedule.

  • Reply 28 of 42
    solipsismy wrote: »
    I agree they need to have more focus on iCloud, but not at the expense of the apps formerly of the iWork and iLife suites. These are pinnacle to iCloud and my user experience would be severely diminished which could lead me to consider not using Macs and iDevices as a single platform if my data wasn't so easily synced and transferable to via these iCloud apps.

    What I suggest is Apple restructure their SW teams and add more people. I think Apple still sees itself as a start up, which is fine, until you can't change your stride when you have a large and complex project spanning multiple OSes.

    Perhaps what they should do (in addition to continue to buy up apps and small developers), is hold large reward competitions to develop the best solutions outside of Apple, then integrate those.
  • Reply 29 of 42
    jfc1138jfc1138 Posts: 3,090member

    Plugging into each and every city transit systems unique tracking system looks to be a huge challenge. The fixed schedules are easy enough but the live tracking, which would be the real value IMHO (how long to the next train/bus in the real world?), that's a steeper climb. 

     

    But where available I much appreciate the information. NJ Transit has it for their commuter line online. NY transit has info displayed on their platforms, I'm not aware ofif they have that on the web. Most transit apps I've used I've used for route maps not realtime tracking.

     

    ETA: MTA does have a tracker app: called "Subway Time"

    https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/mta-subway-time/id561507659?ls=1&mt=8

     

    Though it lists a limited number of lines: 1,2,3,4,5,6, S, L and SIR

  • Reply 30 of 42
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post



    Disband or spinoff the 1st party software. And bring someone in to run their cloud business. 

     

    the new iwork apps *are* part of their cloud business. i use them via my browser all the time. its wonderful.

  • Reply 31 of 42
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post


    hold large reward competitions to develop the best solutions outside of Apple, then integrate those.

     

    we're talking about apple, right? the company famous for its controversial decisions to own its own stack? holding contests to integrate outside software? not gonna happen.

  • Reply 32 of 42
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismY View Post

     
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TheWhiteFalcon View Post



    I actually somewhat agree with Ben Thompson's latest, he wants Apple to dump iWork and iLife entirely, as well as some other elements, to help focus on the big issues (i.e. iCloud).




    I agree they need to have more focus on iCloud, but not at the expense of the apps formerly of the iWork and iLife suites. These are pinnacle to iCloud and my user experience would be severely diminished which could lead me to consider not using Macs and iDevices as a single platform if my data wasn't so easily synced and transferable to via these iCloud apps.



    What I suggest is Apple restructure their SW teams and add more people. I think Apple still sees itself as a start up, which is fine, until you can't change your stride when you have a large and complex project spanning multiple OSes.

     

     

    I'm with you here.

     

    To expand on your point, I would say that Apple need to be constantly examining the short, medium and long term, and master the ability to change as quickly as possible if needed. In other words, they mustn't be beholden to one path, even if that path is very successful. 

     

    It may be that one path works out for them for a very long time; decades even. But other areas of the business may need different approaches.

  • Reply 33 of 42
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    solipsismy wrote: »
    Micrsoft? Oracle? Google? Who do you think could make iOS and Mac OS integrate better than Apple?

    When I said someone I didn't mean another company. I think Apple needs to create another executive level position just to support cloud. And then bring in someone who has vast experience in that area. Poaching someone from Microsoft, Google or Amazon might not be a bad idea.
  • Reply 34 of 42
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    solipsismy wrote: »
    I agree they need to have more focus on iCloud, but not at the expense of the apps formerly of the iWork and iLife suites. These are pinnacle to iCloud and my user experience would be severely diminished which could lead me to consider not using Macs and iDevices as a single platform if my data wasn't so easily synced and transferable to via these iCloud apps.

    What I suggest is Apple restructure their SW teams and add more people. I think Apple still sees itself as a start up, which is fine, until you can't change your stride when you have a large and complex project spanning multiple OSes.

    Ben Thompsons arguement is Apple should focus on making the best OS and providing the best platform for 3rd party development. Steve Jobs mentality was to run Apple like a start up but Apple is too big for that now. As I said before I think Apple should create a new executive level position and that person would oversee iCloud, maps and Siri. I'd like to see maps and Siri get more attention so those products can be moved forward and improved more quickly.
  • Reply 35 of 42
    relicrelic Posts: 4,735member
    I thought Apple already had this, wow talk about late to the part. Regardless, I still prefer using SBB's app, the acronym for the Swiss train system. It's easy, you can pay for tickets in advanced, they offer discounts, especially great when people come to visit and need a rail pass, I can put them on my account to save them money. It's still nice that Apple finally added support for this though, this might do well in places where local transit doesn't have a dedicated app yet.
  • Reply 36 of 42
    solipsismysolipsismy Posts: 5,099member
    rogifan wrote: »
    Ben Thompsons arguement is Apple should focus on making the best OS and providing the best platform for 3rd party development.

    Then his point is myopic because the seamless integration between all their devices is big part of what makes Apple's SW a better user experience, so to remove that would be remove decades of advancement that I've been asking for and only started to get solidified with Yosemite and iOS 8.
  • Reply 37 of 42
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    solipsismy wrote: »
    Then his point is myopic because the seamless integration between all their devices is big part of what makes Apple's SW a better user experience, so to remove that would be remove decades of advancement that I've been asking for and only started to get solidified with Yosemite and iOS 8.

    Here's his exact bullet point.

    http://stratechery.com/2014/best/
    Apple should disband the first party software teams, or spin them out into a different company. Both iLife and iWork – and the pro apps – served very important functions for Apple: they gave a reason to buy a Mac at a time when the lack of 3rd party software was the primary reason not to. Today, though, Apple has the best developer ecosystem in the world, and Apple is actually hurting themselves by competing with it. Not only are any resources spent on apps better spent on the OS, but also the presence of free Apple apps depresses the segments in which they compete. Instead Apple should look for ways to improve developer monetization and sustainability; to put it another way, Apple should focus on building a better platform, not on building on top of it
  • Reply 38 of 42
    solipsismysolipsismy Posts: 5,099member
    rogifan wrote: »
    Here's his exact bullet point.

    http://stratechery.com/2014/best/

    That's definitely a more well thought-out reply than previously presented but I still think it would be folly to do so at this time. I'd think Apple's Mac OS X market share needs to increase before it can consider disbanding the apps formally of the iLife and iWork suites. I would expect major changes to how we do desktop computing before I see that happening.
  • Reply 39 of 42
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post





    I agree. My 9 yr old son is a master with the NYC subway map. There's an app called Embark NYC that has subway schedules, and is updated to show delays, or temporary reroutes.



    Apple acquired Embark and HopStop, both of which were great.

     

    Embark was awesome for subway directions, and I loved HopStop for biking directions. Unfortunately, they havent seen too many updates recently, so I am back to depending on Google Maps. Would be great if Apple came up with a good Maps feature.

     

    In addition, I hope Apple starts treating certain Apps, like Maps, separately, and does not make their release dependent on the OS. There is no good reason for that to be necessary.

  • Reply 40 of 42
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,002member
    addicted44 wrote: »

    Apple acquired Embark and HopStop, both of which were great.

    Embark was awesome for subway directions, and I loved HopStop for biking directions. Unfortunately, they havent seen too many updates recently, so I am back to depending on Google Maps. Would be great if Apple came up with a good Maps feature.

    In addition, I hope Apple starts treating certain Apps, like Maps, separately, and does not make their release dependent on the OS. There is no good reason for that to be necessary.

    Thanks. [@]SpamSandwich[/@] had previously told me that, but I appreciate your input. I for one don't think Embark needs an update. It works fine as is.
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