Google Chrome users can now access their Mac remotely via Chrome Remote Desktop for iOS

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 35
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,367member
    maestro64 wrote: »

    Gee, I have been doing this for almost 20 yrs using first Timbuktu, then I used apples only remote desktop for the last 10 yrs, as well as using Logmein, and TeamViewer and there are more. I also use Desktop Connect on my Ipad to log in and help family members on my Ipad.

    This is nothing news and You have to ask yourself why google wants into this business. Grant it Timbuktu and Apples own remote desktop software do not requiring accessing a third part to connect to remote machine outside you networks. But the other companys are not trying to use your usage information to market product information to you and others

    Me too, I just came across all my Timbuktu install disks this weekend in a cupboard, we had a 20+ Mac network and a bunch were in another city 50 miles away. Fond memories ... and we didn't know what the 'net' or 'email' was back then either, yet had instant communications between all Macs. We had a BT 'tie' line between the two cities.

    Regarding this from Google ... It is a web service I suspect, I've yet to try it. If so it fits into Google's portfolio nicely. It will not require port forwarding if so, so compared to most services pretty idiot proof. I intend to try it for sure. For all my knocking the evil Google I can't see how they can use this to snoop, if they were to, given remote connections are supposedly secure Google would find themselves in deep trouble surely. I may be wrong but this doesn't seem like the motive here.
  • Reply 22 of 35
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post

     

     

     

    Gee, I have been doing this for almost 20 yrs using first Timbuktu, then I used apples only remote desktop for the last 10 yrs, as well as using Logmein, and TeamViewer and there are more. I also use Desktop Connect on my Ipad to log in and help family members on my Ipad.

     

    This is nothing news and You have to ask yourself why google wants into this business. Grant it Timbuktu and Apples own remote desktop software do not requiring accessing a third part to connect to remote machine outside you networks. But the other companys are not trying to use your usage information to market product information to you and others


     

    I've been using many other options for years as well. This option is brain-dead simple, reliability is more good than bad, and there's no financial commitment.

     

    I already know why Google wants into this business, and I don't care.

  • Reply 23 of 35
    So I installed the "Chrome Remote Desktop" in my iPhone.
    So what do I need to install on my PC and mac?
    I keep going to the chrome web store. But not sure what to install on my PC and my Mac
    Any help?
  • Reply 24 of 35
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,367member
    ktngandhi wrote: »
    So I installed the "Chrome Remote Desktop" in my iPhone.
    So what do I need to install on my PC and mac?
    I keep going to the chrome web store. But not sure what to install on my PC and my Mac
    Any help?

    You would need the appropriate desktop client from the Chrome app store. The not so obvious part is you need to do this from the Chrome browser not Safari as far as I can tell.

    https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/chrome-remote-desktop/gbchcmhmhahfdphkhkmpfmihenigjmpp?hl=en

    I would not touch this without Little Snitch running ... but that's just me ;)
  • Reply 25 of 35
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 4,656member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post





    Me too, I just came across all my Timbuktu install disks this weekend in a cupboard, we had a 20+ Mac network and a bunch were in another city 50 miles away. Fond memories ... and we didn't know what the 'net' or 'email' was back then either, yet had instant communications between all Macs. We had a BT 'tie' line between the two cities.



    Regarding this from Google ... It is a web service I suspect, I've yet to try it. If so it fits into Google's portfolio nicely. It will not require port forwarding if so, so compared to most services pretty idiot proof. I intend to try it for sure. For all my knocking the evil Google I can't see how they can use this to snoop, if they were to, given remote connections are supposedly secure Google would find themselves in deep trouble surely. I may be wrong but this doesn't seem like the motive here.

    The only way this works is the target machine has to be logged into google somehow or have a daemon running on the target machine, ie something running in the background. This is the only way to avoid point forward when you have more than one compute behind a firewall or DHCP servers. this is how Logmein or Teamviewer works. What was nice about Timbuktu it does not require someone on the other end to connect, I there was time I told family to leave the computer on and I would log in and fix what every needed done. Currently I use Desktop Connect on my ipad and it does not even require you to leave the computer on, you can send a WOL to get the computer out of sleep and you can also put it back to sleep or shut it down. Desktop Connect requires turning remote management on mac and you are set to go, not need to install anything and you can also set access privileges and password on what someone can and can not do on your computer.

     

    Remember you only get what you pay for, with google if you are getting it free you are signing away some rights of yours and everything they do is to promote selling more ads to present to us and user information is their main objective.

  • Reply 26 of 35
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 4,656member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post





    You would need the appropriate desktop client from the Chrome app store. The not so obvious part is you need to do this from the Chrome browser not Safari as far as I can tell.



    https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/chrome-remote-desktop/gbchcmhmhahfdphkhkmpfmihenigjmpp?hl=en



    I would not touch this without Little Snitch running ... but that's just me image

    I agree, you would be amazed how much google is doing, I got all google related websites outside google.com blocked with little snitch. I have other programs who also attempted to communicated with google related websites. Google got their fingers into lots of things.

     

    I specially make sure I have Google analytics websites blocked this is the site they use to collect stats on what you doing on your computer

  • Reply 27 of 35
    physguyphysguy Posts: 915member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by hpod View Post

     

     

    I sympathize, as I use one of these options listed, but for the average user:

     

    Every last one of these options requires port forwarding through a router (IF your ISP even allows it, and something most users have no idea even exists), in addition, you need to know the destination IP address (IF it doesn't change), not to mention it would allow anyone in the world to attempt connections on said ports unless you know the source IP's would never change and added them to some sort of firewall. Also of note, and I'm sure you realize, most people do not have static IP's, and while DNS could be leveraged in a more dynamic way by a select few, MOST wouldn't know where to begin, or even how to begin such a process.

     

    Google's option requires NONE of those things, is secure since it's tied to your Google account (complete with two factor auth if enabled), encrypted, and dynamically open to just those with access to your Google account, so others couldn't portscan your network to find it.

     

    Believe it or not, MOST average users do not know what any of the following is, and if they do, they have a basic understanding at best: IP addresses, firewalls, port forwarding, routers/modems, ports, ssh, dns, remote desktop

     

    TL;DR: Every option you listed requires skill to implement and use, while Google's requires almost none.




    Not really.  Turn on Back-to-my-mac and it just appears in the Finder.  Click screen share. I've never had any problem except for very locked down network but then most other solutions didn't work there either.

  • Reply 28 of 35
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,367member
    physguy wrote: »

    Not really.  Turn on Back-to-my-mac and it just appears in the Finder.  Click screen share. I've never had any problem except for very locked down network but then most other solutions didn't work there either.

    You know, I've never even tried Back to my Mac as I use ARD! I must try it. Can it be used to access someone else's Mac that wants you to, such as in a remote software service call for a client? Or is is it specific to your own Macs only.
  • Reply 29 of 35
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,367member
    maestro64 wrote: »
    The only way this works is the target machine has to be logged into google somehow or have a daemon running on the target machine, ie something running in the background. This is the only way to avoid point forward when you have more than one compute behind a firewall or DHCP servers. this is how Logmein or Teamviewer works. What was nice about Timbuktu it does not require someone on the other end to connect, I there was time I told family to leave the computer on and I would log in and fix what every needed done. Currently I use Desktop Connect on my ipad and it does not even require you to leave the computer on, you can send a WOL to get the computer out of sleep and you can also put it back to sleep or shut it down. Desktop Connect requires turning remote management on mac and you are set to go, not need to install anything and you can also set access privileges and password on what someone can and can not do on your computer.

    Remember you only get what you pay for, with google if you are getting it free you are signing away some rights of yours and everything they do is to promote selling more ads to present to us and user information is their main objective.

    Yep, I tried it with Little Snitch monitoring and sure enough I had to temporarily allow masses of Google connections just to get the daemon running, and I am pretty sure a ton of them were nothing to do with the actual intended purpose of remote control. Several were obviously tracking and analytics. I assume they keep active round the clock. My test is over and Little Snitch has now slammed shut all doors. Gotta love Little Snitch!
  • Reply 30 of 35
    physguyphysguy Posts: 915member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post





    You know, I'never even tried Back to my Mac as I use ARD! I must try it. Can it be used to access someone else's Mac that wants you to, such as in a remote software service call for a client? Or is is it specific to your own Macs only.



    Its' tied to an apple ID so not directly.  For family support I just have another login on my laptop that uses the other's apple ID but that, of course, gives access to everything.

     

    For general access I've just used Remoter VNC with ssh tunneling though my main server.  So this does require 1 port forwarding of port 22 to the server but uses bonjour from there to find other systems on the network.

  • Reply 31 of 35
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by genovelle View Post



    Nothing is free. There is always a cost.



    Yea right, kinda like Obama's plan for "free" college tuition.

    Wish more people would realize this

  • Reply 32 of 35
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,367member
    physguy wrote: »

    Its' tied to an apple ID so not directly.  For family support I just have another login on my laptop that uses the other's apple ID but that, of course, gives access to everything.

    For general access I've just used Remoter VNC with ssh tunneling though my main server.  So this does require 1 port forwarding of port 22 to the server but uses bonjour from there to find other systems on the network.

    OK thanks, i suspected it was tied to Apple ID. I just deleted all the Google Chrome and Chrome DR stuff of my Mac Pro ... way too much stuff for my liking.
  • Reply 33 of 35
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,367member
    jesseret wrote: »

    Yea right, kinda like Obama's plan for "free" college tuition.
    Wish more people would realize this

    Not getting political here, simply factual. Read the history of the GI bill, America's great experiment with free higher education. You will find it fascinating how money spent educating people better is repaid over time handsomely. That is why most every first world country there is helps with it. That's not to say standards should not be high and entrance only to those that qualify.
  • Reply 34 of 35
    Not getting political here, simply factual. Read the history of the GI bill, America's great experiment with free higher education. You will find it fascinating how money spent educating people better is repaid over time handsomely. That is why most every first world country there is helps with it. That's not to say standards should not be high and entrance only to those that qualify.
    jesseret wrote: »

    Yea right, kinda like Obama's plan for "free" college tuition.
    Wish more people would realize this

    At least it's an an investment in the future instead of an investment in the pockets of the alraady rich. I can promise we pay more in subsidies to very profitable companies who pay to get politicians elected that this program would ever cost. Just go digging around in the budget. It's scary how much we pay for but get no benefit from. We all benefit from having a more educated and productive work force.

    Thinking about it, it may be cheaper and a better use of resources this way. If you are objecting to paying for low income people getting to go college, keep in mind that already exist through federal grants. They cover a much more than what going to a community college would cost. This could really be a slick way of redirecting them away from major universities while in some cases improving the chances of success.
  • Reply 35 of 35
    In addition to Chrome RDP, R-HUB remote support servers can also be used for remotely accessing MAC computers from iPhone, iPad etc. It has a remote support iOS app which can be freely downloaded from Apple store.
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