Swiss watch industry headed for an 'ice age' thanks to Apple Watch, Swatch inventor says

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  • Reply 41 of 146
    quadra 610quadra 610 Posts: 6,756member

    Know what'll happen to a lot of the non-watch, phone-only folks?

     

    They'll TRY the Watch. Because Apple. Apple stuff ALWAYS gets tried (because Apple, and Apple's reputation... and because ... stuff people WANT ..... because Apple.) Even if you consider JUST the Apple Store. Walk into any one. You'll see it's always jammed to the rafters, with people trying stuff out. 

     

    That's all Apple needs. Just TRY it. At the store, or with a friend who has one, etc. And they WILL.

     

    And THEN . . .

     

     

     

    "A lot of times, people don't know what they want until you show it to them.”

    ~ Steve Jobs

     

     

     

     

    Boom.

  • Reply 42 of 146
    nhtnht Posts: 4,522member
    sflocal wrote: »

    This is a stupid statement.  
    ...

    The lower-end watch makers like swatch, timex, etc.. I think they will be impacted.

    Funny. That's what he said. And yet you think it's stupid to say that folks in the segment should have been more proactive given that the watch had been telegraphed for a while now.
  • Reply 43 of 146
    solipsismysolipsismy Posts: 5,099member
    I was going to bring that up yesterday... but couldn't decide which avenue/angle to take... considering that there was an Apple Watch orgy happening in most threads.

    Yeah, when the prices came out yesterday I thought of it but did have to get to it. I look forward to an in-depth exposé on this pheromonen. I like JLG could do well with this topic.
  • Reply 44 of 146
    inklinginkling Posts: 731member
    The Swiss have one major advantage. By being less technological, their watches are far less likely to become obsolete in a few years. Were I offered an Apple Watch or a Rolex of comparable value, I wouldn't hesitate to take the Rolex.
  • Reply 45 of 146
    solipsismysolipsismy Posts: 5,099member
    sflocal wrote: »
    The lower-end watch makers like swatch, timex, etc.. I think they will be impacted.

    I don't know about Timex but Swatch isn't low-end. I think Swatch Group not only dominates the mid and higher end of the markets but are the most dominate and more profitable.
  • Reply 46 of 146
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismY View Post



    Yeah, when the prices came out yesterday I thought of it but did have to get to it. I look forward to an in-depth exposé on this pheromonen. I like JLG could do well with this topic.

     

    At least if you buy a sport model you can always point out to a person with the Edition model that your watch is built to the same exact standards... same software too... just minus the gold.

  • Reply 46 of 146
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Inkling View Post



    The Swiss have one major advantage. By being less technological, their watches are far less likely to become obsolete in a few years. Were I offered an Apple Watch or a Rolex of comparable value, I wouldn't hesitate to take the Rolex.



    However, this is Apple's stake in the ground. Give it another 5-6 years and we'll be looking at highly advanced technology capable of running on far less power, but capable of much more than this first iteration.

  • Reply 48 of 146
    nhtnht Posts: 4,522member
    ingela wrote: »
    As jewelry, high end traditional watches will be fine. But my microwave has a clock, my oven and TV have clocks. My car, my computer and phone have a clock.No need to strap one on too. But this is just the beginning. Soon we will see wrist devices dispatched to to entire police forces with dedicated apps. To warehouse workers, Everywhere. And it's not just the Swiss that need worry, Apple itself. After adoption comes commoditization. So it's a never ending loop of innovation, adaptation, commodization. Industry has to always try and stay ahead of it.


    The first thing Android wear will copy is the haptic feedback for notifications. As with the early smart phone inventions before it, it now seems obvious. Hindsight is 50/50

    If anything the Mac and iPhone shows that Apple does not fear commoditization and has been the most effective company in maintaining ASP and margins in commoditized markets.
  • Reply 49 of 146
    quadra 610quadra 610 Posts: 6,756member
    When the iPad was released, I was all THIS way:


     


    Very cool. It'll totally change the computer game. Huge. Apple did it again. 


     


    But I already have a Mac AND an iPhone. WHY do I need a bigger iPhone (or basically, a bigger iPod Touch)?


     


    After I played around with an iPad, I was all THIS way:


     


    Ooooohh, ok. I get. 


     


    I want one. 


     


    *Random question from someone directed at my person*:


     


    "Ok, but WHAT is the point"?


     


    Answer:


     


    I have no idea. I just love using it. Don't know what it is. But it just feels great to use. Like, I'm looking for more excuses to do more things with it.  
  • Reply 50 of 146
    solipsismysolipsismy Posts: 5,099member
    inkling wrote: »
    The Swiss have one major advantage. By being less technological, their watches are far less likely to become obsolete in a few years. Were I offered an Apple Watch or a Rolex of comparable value, I wouldn't hesitate to take the Rolex.

    Are there any counter examples that show a simpler tech is likely to become obsolete despite it's after-purchase longevity because the utility is too low within a changing culture?
  • Reply 51 of 146
    solipsismysolipsismy Posts: 5,099member

    However, this is Apple's stake in the ground. Give it another 5-6 years and we'll be looking at highly advanced technology capable of running on far less power, but capable of much more than this first iteration.

    Today the disentors say, "Apple is so late to this party," and I a few years they'll be saying, "That's because Apple happened to be first." You know, how they were the first ones to ever build a tablet or smartphone.
  • Reply 52 of 146
    philsphils Posts: 22member
    First of all I love Apple and I have been a loyal customer for many many years...

    The Apple Watch will disrupt the watch industry? Come on.... really?

    Let me remind you that even Steve recognized when the company made mistakes many times during his tenure as CEO of Apple.

    As an Apple product the watch is a mistake for different reasons..... they are forgetting their true heritage.. a company that kept things simple, that made products that solved problems and that served a purpose, a company that didn't confuse customers with so many options & variants.... it seems ironic for a company that praises simplicity and making less products in order to make them right. Reading emails and text on a watch?? sending icons & sketches..... sending your heartbeat/tapping to another watch???? answering calls on a watch?? Who are we kidding?? This is just a gadget...Plus you need your phone in order to have full functionality....

    In my opinion this only makes sense as a sport watch... and most likely thats how most people will use it.

    The things is...that Apple will sell millions.... for a while.... eventually time will show that this is just a fashion item.... and like everything in fashion things last for a season...
  • Reply 53 of 146
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,002member
    solipsismy wrote: »
    Today the disentors say, "Apple is so late to this party," and I a few years they'll be saying, "That's because Apple happened to be first." You know, how they were the first ones to ever build a tablet or smartphone.

    Only people that had no clue that smartphones, and tablets existed before Apple's offerings say that.
  • Reply 54 of 146
    nhtnht Posts: 4,522member
    solipsismy wrote: »
    Are there any counter examples that show a simpler tech is likely to become obsolete despite it's after-purchase longevity because the utility is too low within a changing culture?

    The buggy whip is the classic example. Typewriters another. Paper encyclopedias.

    There are plenty of military examples. The Rolex is like a finely crafted sword. The apple watch a finely crafted matchlock pistol. One is at the end of a long evolution and at its pinnacle of refinement. The other at the beginning of its evolution and crude despite its craftsmanship.
  • Reply 55 of 146
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,505member
    Some of Finland's politicians already claimed Apple destroyed their country's economy, next is it to be the Swiss? Surely not.
  • Reply 56 of 146
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,505member
    nht wrote: »
    The buggy whip is the classic example. Typewriters another. Paper encyclopedias.

    There are plenty of military examples. The Rolex is like a finely crafted sword. The apple watch a finely crafted matchlock pistol. One is at the end of a long evolution and at its pinnacle of refinement. The other at the beginning of its evolution and crude despite its craftsmanship.

    The buggy whip is making 50 shades of a come back though! ;)

    Seriously the ?Watch is the first watch that is likely to retire my 30 year old Rolex other than for State banquets of course. :D
  • Reply 57 of 146
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,505member
    quadra 610 wrote: »
    "A lot of times, people don't know what they want until you show it to them.”


    When I was 14 I had a 16 year old girl friend that said the exact same thing! :D
  • Reply 58 of 146
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,002member
    solipsismy wrote: »
    Are there any counter examples that show a simpler tech is likely to become obsolete despite it's after-purchase longevity because the utility is too low within a changing culture?

    That's a great question, and I'm racking my brain trying to come up with one, but so far I can't. There is, however, a piece of old tech that has made a resurgence of late, and that's the safety shaver my dad used to shave with. The type with the little knob on the bottom that one turns to open up the flaps to install the double sided Gem razor.
  • Reply 59 of 146
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post





    That's a great question, and I'm racking my brain trying to come up with one, but so far I can't. There is, however, a piece of old tech that has made a resurgence of late, and that's the safety shaver my dad used to shave with. The type with the little knob on the bottom that one turns to open up the flaps to install the double sided Gem razor.



    I've seen that from companies like Harry's and Dollar Shave Club... it's a strange trend. I prefer an electric razor, then use a cheap blade for "detailing".

  • Reply 60 of 146
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,002member
    When I was 14 I had a 16 year old girl friend that said the exact same thing! :D

    Did you rush her to the ER screaming "this girl's got a huge gash, please save her"? :lol:
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