Third-party Apple Watch housing promises underwater capabilities, duo dock charges Watch and iPhone

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  • Reply 21 of 39
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,454member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by peteo View Post

     
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tonton View Post



    That case looks like absolute ass. The watch with the case will be fecking huge!

     

    The watch is rated IPX 7 which is good for 30mins in 1 meter, NOT MOVING. when its submerged and moves a lot water can get it.

     


    Agreed this is not a very attractive band-aid to Apple eventually releasing a truly water resistant watch rated for water activities.

     

    And you are correct, the IPX 7 rating applies to sitting still in a tank of water -- which implies a constant pressure. Moving water and force of contact changes that equation. Now, there is no guarantee that the watch will not stand up to more, but presumably Apple did test the extremes, and it did not or they would certainly have published the result in the form of higher rating.

     

    This is Apple's exact language: "Apple Watch is splash and water resistant but not waterproof. You can, for example, wear and use Apple Watch during exercise, in the rain, and while washing your hands, but submerging Apple Watch is not recommended."

     

    Right there, they are saying NOT to submerge your watch. The IPX7 rating should theoretically cover a drop from a few feet into a toilet, or a sink, or the usual things that can kill an iPhone. You can probably sit in the shallow end of a pool with your arms under the water for less than :30. But the greater the pressure of water against the surface of the watch, the less likely it is to be able to prevent water ingress. Therefore, swimming laps would probably compromise the watch rather quickly, consider the increased force from movement the water will have upon the surface of the watch. It's the same reason that jumping into a pool from from 3 feet won't kill you, but jumping into the bay from the Golden Gate bridge likely will. The water pressure is multiplied directly relational to the force of contact.

     

    It's going to be rather interesting to see how Apple handles this, as their customers are notorious for not reading the small print -- and certainly more than a few independent testers are going to put the watch through its paces after it's released. So I expect the rough tolerances are going to be exposed very soon, and we'll all know -- and more importantly, by what means the water may enter the watch ... if it truly is only mic and speaker related there may be third party methods to address just those points (and the case described in this article, overkill). Yet another reason to wait to buy the watch if water-resistance is important to you. 

  • Reply 22 of 39
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 5,014member
    tonton wrote: »
    That case looks like absolute ass. The watch with the case will be fecking huge!

    Apple has said publicly that you can wash your hands with the watch on.

    If it gets damaged due to swimming laps (not likely, it's just a precaution to tell you not to do it), what's to stop someone from claiming it got damaged through normal use while washing your hands?

    Actually, sweating. I seen other "sport related" electronic having issues with people's sweat. Only those items which are specifically design to be water resistant to something more then a meter of water hold up to athletic activities. Keep in mind Apple is saying it is a luxury item which automatically says it not for everyday abuse, but they also say it for health and activity base uses which mean people are going to sweat on it.
  • Reply 23 of 39
    jfc1138jfc1138 Posts: 3,090member

    Special use cases for a watch: interesting concept.

     

    I've used such for cameras, diving and simply extremely wet environments I see the point.

  • Reply 24 of 39
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    Quote:


     Dubbed Banded


     

    Surely they meant Bandaid.  Hideous.  If you need a watch that's properly waterproof - get one.

  • Reply 25 of 39
    jfc1138jfc1138 Posts: 3,090member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by pmz View Post

     

    Will one of these "dock" solutions ever be made heavy enough so that you don't have to hold the damn thing in place while putting the iPhone in/taking it out?




    You just need to commit

    http://www.gorillatough.com

  • Reply 26 of 39
    baederbaeder Posts: 25member
    Okay, who picks a name 'designed by many' for their company. And I'm supposed to trust them to have a waterproof case?? FAIL. They won't even be around when all the people (both) who buy their product have it fail.
  • Reply 27 of 39
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,405member
    pmz wrote: »

    Except for me, as I would never put some hideous case on an iPhone.


    I have never used a case on any iPhone I have owned either and only had one accident that resulted in a slight dent. They look and feel too good to me to put in cases. I feel the same about my iPads. I have put an Apple case on my old iPad 2 that now is the screen for my Mac Mini server. BTW as an aside: using Duet it is amazing how much of OS X works with the touch input!
  • Reply 28 of 39
    siretmansiretman Posts: 108member
    What is the problem?
    If you are going to the beach or a pool and you are going into the water, take the watch off!!!!
    If you are taking a shower or bath, take the watch off!!!! I cannot understand how you can take a shower or bath with the watch in your wrist. Do you soap your wrist with the watch on? Ridiculous!!!!
    If you are washing your hands or just walk in the rain, you don't have to take the watch off!!!
    Pretty straightforward. This is a very minor issue in the use of the watch if you use your common sense.
    I will not be changing the protocol with my present watch. No change!!! Life is easy and great with an Apple Watch!!!
  • Reply 29 of 39
    brlawyerbrlawyer Posts: 828member
    Ghastly.

    What is already ugly and bulky becomes even uglier and bulkier.
  • Reply 30 of 39
    peteopeteo Posts: 395member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SolipsismY View Post



    Think about it for a second. How does Apple indemnify themselves against the wide variety of swimming? Why would they want to take that risk?

    Only if you don't think about it does that risk become a feature.

    Exactly my point. Thanks for finally catching up, and yet despite your statement you still not grasping what the IP rating is actually stating. To restate (yet again) IP rating merely states what the company is fine with advertising as the highest common denominator for which t can insure the product will operate, not the maximum upper limit possible among all devices under all scenarios.

    1) If it does break they will be to protect themselves, but if they said, you can "swim with it" which they mean it will take allow the average person to do laps in a pool and but you interpret that to mean you can snorkel with it for a week during your Bahama vacation going down up to 5M every day you may fund yourself to have a different outcome.



    2) Will Apple use a pressure sensor to know 1M v 1.1M? That'll be interesting. How will they measure whether it's been submerged for more than 30 minutes in ? 1M of water?





    PS: I'll bet yout $399 — the cost of a 42mm ?Watch Sport — that ?Watch will be able to withstand a submersion of 1.1M and 31 minutes submerged. If it can't, you pay me $399.

     


    "If it gets damaged due to swimming laps (not likely, it's just a precaution to tell you not to do it), what's to stop someone from claiming it got damaged through normal use while washing your hands?"

    This what i was responding to. And YES IT IS LIKELY TO GET DAMAGED SWIMMING LAPS. thats what the IPX 7 Rating tells you

    So again, when you try and swim with your watch (maybe not the 1st, 2nd or 3rd time) and it does not work after. Dont be surprised when the apple "genius" says, sorry this kind of damage is not covered.

    if it was made for swimming it would be rated IPX 8

    how will apple know? because the Water sensor will turn red, which means water got in the watch, which means most likely you did something with the watch to get water into it and thats not covered. (im sure they'll look and see if there are any seal breaks. probably by opening the watch putting another water strip sealing it and putting in water to see if that one turns red under IPX 7 conditions. (i.e. in a bucket))

    So I.E. if you dont want to be out 350+ DO NOT SWIM with the apple watch
  • Reply 31 of 39
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,454member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by peteo View Post



    how will apple know? because the Water sensor will turn red, which means water got in the watch, which means you did something with the watch to get water into it and thats not covered.

    I wouldn't be too sure about this, which is what I alluded to in my earlier response to you ... The iPhone is not meant to be exposed to water at all, and thus the water indicator works. But the watch has a minimum water rating for submersion, whereas Apple explicitly says NOT to submerge it at all. So it's contradictory at best. Is it because Apple is trying to hedge their bets as the watch just barely meets that rating? Or is it because they are trying to embassies this watch is not meant for water-related activities?

     

    So it will be curious to see how Apple ends up handling water damage. They don't have an explicit list of permitted activities, so if you wear it in the shower and it fails, how can they refuse to replace it when Tim Cook is on record as wearing his in the shower? Likewise, if you take a :30 bath while wearing the watch, and it fails, how can they refuse to replace it when the IPX7 rating permits submersion for up to :30 in up to a meter of water?

     

    Again, once we know all the details, after the watch gets torn down, drop-tested, water-tested and otherwise put through its paces, we'll have a better idea. But this is definitely a new area for Apple with respect to customer service.

  • Reply 32 of 39
    stanhopestanhope Posts: 159member
    Gawd that thing is fugly. Can you imagine the increased bulk this monstrosity will add?
  • Reply 33 of 39
    A shock-absorber for Apple Watch already exists!!

    ActionProof has developed a bumper for all needs,
    but especially for outdoor activities and sport lovers!

    Check it out on Indiegogo "TheBumper": http://goo.gl/MfcKrN
  • Reply 34 of 39
    A shock-absorber for Apple Watch already exists!!

    ActionProof has developed a bumper for all needs,
    but especially for outdoor activities and sport lovers!

    Check it out on Indiegogo "TheBumper": http://goo.gl/MfcKrN
  • Reply 35 of 39
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post





    Actually, sweating. I seen other "sport related" electronic having issues with people's sweat. Only those items which are specifically design to be water resistant to something more then a meter of water hold up to athletic activities. Keep in mind Apple is saying it is a luxury item which automatically says it not for everyday abuse, but they also say it for health and activity base uses which mean people are going to sweat on it.

     

    If they say its a sports watch, it is a sports watch and resistant to sweat. Seems simple isn't it. And the rating they gave it seems to bear this. BTW, I jog with my phone without a case and Its not rated for sweat either. Not the Iphone 6+; its just too large to jog with it in hand.

  • Reply 36 of 39
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

     

     

     

    Tag Heuer announced today that they're going to have to start cutting prices worldwide because of the Swiss Franc. (Sure...)

     

    In any event, it would most certainly be a pricing strategy consistent with getting the Google/Android crowd on board.


     

    Cutting profit margins has worked oh so well for the other Android OEM... When will those ever learn. Not only that, they run the risk of people conflating their product with all the other Android wear crud. Not a good thing.

  • Reply 37 of 39
    foggyhill wrote: »
    maestro64 wrote: »
    Actually, sweating. I seen other "sport related" electronic having issues with people's sweat. Only those items which are specifically design to be water resistant to something more then a meter of water hold up to athletic activities. Keep in mind Apple is saying it is a luxury item which automatically says it not for everyday abuse, but they also say it for health and activity base uses which mean people are going to sweat on it.

    If they say its a sports watch, it is a sports watch and resistant to sweat. Seems simple isn't it. And the rating they gave it seems to bear this. BTW, I jog with my phone without a case and Its not rated for sweat either. Not the Iphone 6+; its just too large to jog with it in hand.

    Is it rated for perspiration, though?

    Ladies perspire.
  • Reply 38 of 39
    peteopeteo Posts: 395member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post



    Is it rated for perspiration, though?



    Ladies perspire.

     

    Yes it looks like they tested for that
    http://www.theverge.com/2015/3/20/8264241/apple-watch-secret-fitness-lab
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