Intel Core M lets new MacBook go light and fanless, but with sacrifices

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  • Reply 141 of 202
    hillstoneshillstones Posts: 1,490member
    slurpy wrote: »
    Your analogy is so insanely flawed it's hilarious. Also, all those "BUT IT DOESNT HAVE XXXX!!" argument could have been levelled against every single Apple product that became insanely successful, the argument is meaningless, irrelevant, and frankly boring. A "fool" would buy the new Macbook over the MBA, really? In your intellectual dishonesty, I guess it's convenient to ignore the fact that the Macbook has 4X as many pixels, starts at 2X the RAM, as well as 2X the SSD storage of the Air- not to mention the improvements in weight, trackpad, keyboard, etc. Frankly, the Air would be a bad choice for most compared to the new Macbook. So, all you've got left is the "ports" argument, that trolls have used to attack every new Apple product, as if that has EVER determined success or failure. There's like 50 examples in recent history how lack of ports did NOT negatively affect an Apple product compared to its predecessors, so you had to dig through ancient history with the G4 cube to bring up a really, really bad analogy to support your non-point. Yes, the Macbook is bold, but I'll start worrying when Apple ceases to be bold, and starts listening to people like you who are so terrified of change and of losing ports. 

    It is an accurate analogy. You are too stupid to understand it. I guess you missed the part of the article that pointed out the flaws. Enjoy the Apple Kool-Aid. You are the fool that would buy the crippled MacBook instead of the better featured MacBook Pro 13 with retina for the same price. You are so fucking stupid, my analogy compared it to the MacBook Pro with retina, not the air, dipshit. Learn how to fucking read next time. Every post you make is full of misinformation.
  • Reply 142 of 202
    staticx57staticx57 Posts: 405member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SolipsismY View Post





    Proof that the currently shipping A8X has a 4.5W TDP?

    It appears that memory is a bit faulty, and that the iPad Air 1 is the one with a confirmed TDP in that area: http://www.anandtech.com/show/7460/apple-ipad-air-review/3

     

    But I cannot imagine the Air 2 using less power. Besides 4.5 is a very common tablet TDP.

  • Reply 143 of 202
    bkkcanuckbkkcanuck Posts: 864member

    The Mhz/Ghz war also tends to take the baseline speed of the processor and compare it, which is extremely silly since it really is 1.1Ghz to 2.4Ghz and 1.3Ghz to 2.9Ghz.  Most people use do not power the CPU at anywhere near 100% all the time.... It goes mostly idle - jumps up - goes back to mostly idle.  Energy efficiency requires running under lower power slower when the processor is not needed then ramping up when it is needed.   To fully test what it would do before it becomes available is test it without black-box power utilities (some of which were poorly implemented for this processor by Lenovo etc.) and other operating systems which have not necessarily optimized.  

     

    I have seen tests where the results were comparable to the previous Macbook air, and tests where it was slightly less power.   Of course performance in it's entirety cannot be taken without reference to what SSD is in there and the fact it has more memory (I would argue the SSD was the single biggest upgrade recently that gave laptops a sense of much greater performance).  The SSDs used these days are faster than the hard drives and faster than the SATA3 based SSDs.... 

     

    Given all those things together, and being confident that Apple has worked not to degrade the performance for general tasks at the low end, I am sure that this portable will have sufficient power for doing most peoples tasks very well.  Would I buy it and install VMware for Windows on it, or do video editing.... no... but there are more powerful laptop options if that is what you need.  

     

    When I take a laptop away from the desk for the day (charged for a day) I don't bring a lot of accessories with me.  I only take the laptop and I prefer it to be as light as possible so I don't feel weighed down.  When I bring it back, I would probably get a dock for power and hooking up an external monitor.  

     

    I am also sure this is the first laptop in the line (coming in at the high end) and there will be ones with half the SSD and half the memory for less than $1,000 when the supplies are no longer constrained.  

     

    I expect it to take at least 15% of the iPad market (10 million units) and a portion of the Macbook air (overlapping it at the low end) as well as some new customers and within the first year outsell the rest of the mac line (i.e. more than 50% of the sales).  It will also increase the overall market share for the mac line (which I find exciting).  

     

    I see a lot of people complaining about either ports or power without considering that their use case is not the general use case, nor what their use case would be....   I think some of the pro customers are just whining because they got their nice new shiny toy before the rest of the market (which will likely be the fall).  

     

    I am pretty thrilled by this little new computer - and although it does not meet all my needs I would probably balance out my pro needs with portability needs by buying this one (in addition to my older Mac Pro).  

  • Reply 144 of 202
    rerollreroll Posts: 60member
    It's just an iPad pro.
  • Reply 145 of 202
    frantisekfrantisek Posts: 756member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post



    Since the new MacBook hasn't been released, it hasn't been benchmarked, but we can get a good approximation from another Core M system, the Lenovo Yoga 3 Pro. That notebook has a 1.1 GHz chip identical to Apple's, and according to Digital Trends has Geekbench scores of just 2,453 in single-core mode and 4,267 in multi-core. That slots it below the 2,565 and 5,042 of the cheapest 2015 Air.

     

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by RobertC View Post

     

    The Geekbench score for the ASUS T300 Chi (5Y71) is 2944 single-core and 5680 multi-core (source).  The T300 Chi is a fanless 12.5" tablet, clearly the Lenovo 3 Pro still suffers from poor implementation.

     

    I'm certain the 2015 MacBook will offer performance levels at (if not higher than) the ASUS. 


     

    ASUS is 1.4 GHz but Lenovo 1.1 GHz. If you do simple math results are roughly equal.

  • Reply 146 of 202
    bkkcanuckbkkcanuck Posts: 864member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismY View Post





    Wow! That's impressive considering they launched the same year and the tray price of the Core-i7 is more than $100 higher.



    I didn't realized Core M-5Y71 doesn't offer virtualization. I'm curious how that will affect running Fusion or Parallels.

     

    Well, the M-5Y70 DOES offer "virtualization" according to Intel and since that one is a speed bump up from the base - I would expect whoever started the rumour about this causing performance problems was wrong....

     

    http://ark.intel.com/products/83612/Intel-Core-M-5Y70-Processor-4M-Cache-up-to-2_60-GHz

     

    The stock processor in the macbook is comparable to the stock base processor in the last revision of macbook air (not sure about this revision) [somethings the same, some things slightly slower, some things slightly faster] but combined with a faster SSD for it should perform reasonably well.  I will wait until it is actually released to see how it runs OS X -- but I am sure a lot of effort was made in making sure (since the same company selecting the processor is the same one writing the operating system).

  • Reply 147 of 202
    y2any2an Posts: 191member
    Strange how review #1 is missing. I wrote it, critiquing the nature of this story. Seems that AI editorialises the forums.
  • Reply 148 of 202
    The user and all related content has been deleted.
  • Reply 149 of 202
    jmd82jmd82 Posts: 1member
    I don't get why everyone thinks thinness is a big deal. I carry around a almost 5 lb. Lappy all day, I can't even feel the thing in my bag.
  • Reply 150 of 202
    hledgardhledgard Posts: 265member

    I really like the new MacBook, but would love to have some kind of data plan to use it anywhere, just like the iPad.

     

    Is there any way to do this?

  • Reply 151 of 202
    philipmphilipm Posts: 240member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by tyler82 View Post



    It's odd that there was a "megahertz war" in the early 2000s between Apple and Intel (which is why Apple always touted the other powerful aspects of the PowerPC over the Pentium) because I remember Intel reaching 1ghz first, and that was around 2002 or so. Yet we are still at 1ghz chips. I would think we would have 100 ghz by now,

     

    The thing that didn't keep up is RAM speeds. That is why designers went multicore rather than aiming for a single maximally fast instruction stream. Look up "memory wall". I wrote a summary of the problem a while back.

  • Reply 152 of 202

    At this point processing power does not need to be worked on a bunch.  Power consumption, size and efficiency are key metrics IMO.  Apple needs to continue to challenge developers to not be lazy and improve the code to take full advantage of system architecture.

  • Reply 153 of 202
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by hillstones View Post





    It is an accurate analogy. You are too stupid to understand it. I guess you missed the part of the article that pointed out the flaws. Enjoy the Apple Kool-Aid. You are the fool that would buy the crippled MacBook instead of the better featured MacBook Pro 13 with retina for the same price. You are so fucking stupid, my analogy compared it to the MacBook Pro with retina, not the air, dipshit. Learn how to fucking read next time. Every post you make is full of misinformation.



    Watch the language.  

     

    First of all, the article was a "review" of the new MacBook, minus the actual new MacBook, so any "flaws" should be taken with a grain of salt.  

     

    Second, the new MacBook is very much like the iPad, it's not meant to be an everything to everyone computer, but rather a thin and light computer that will do all the basic functions a computer needs to do (for the average user).  Will it replace your existing MacBook Pro that you have plugged into your wired network, scanner, printer, external monitor, keyboard and mouse?  No.  Why should it?  And in case you had not noticed, a lot of peripherals are going or have gone wireless, in part because of the iPad.  In my office, I used to need to plug 2 printers into my computer, but that changed when the printers were replaced with wireless units.  Again, I get that there will always be scenarios that require some hard connectivity, but the new MacBook can be connected if you absolutely have to, although for most who buy it, that will be a non-issue.

     

    If it's because you can't afford to own it, and another desktop or more powerful laptop that can do all the high performance computing you apparently need, that is not Apple's fault or issue.

     

    And suggesting the new MacBook is crippled is a ridiculous comment at best.  Crippled how, exactly?  It has a low power processor...so you're not going to do heavy duty video processing or engineering computing.  Why would you think that it should do this?  The same thing is true for any PC's that are thin and light - they can't do what the bigger, faster, heavier laptops can.  Big surprise there, really. 

  • Reply 154 of 202
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by jmgregory1 View Post

     



    Watch the language.  

     

    First of all, the article was a "review" of the new MacBook, minus the actual new MacBook, so any "flaws" should be taken with a grain of salt.  

     

    Second, the new MacBook is very much like the iPad, it's not meant to be an everything to everyone computer, but rather a thin and light computer that will do all the basic functions a computer needs to do (for the average user).  Will it replace your existing MacBook Pro that you have plugged into your wired network, scanner, printer, external monitor, keyboard and mouse?  No.  Why should it?  And in case you had not noticed, a lot of peripherals are going or have gone wireless, in part because of the iPad.  In my office, I used to need to plug 2 printers into my computer, but that changed when the printers were replaced with wireless units.  Again, I get that there will always be scenarios that require some hard connectivity, but the new MacBook can be connected if you absolutely have to, although for most who buy it, that will be a non-issue.

     

    If it's because you can't afford to own it, and another desktop or more powerful laptop that can do all the high performance computing you apparently need, that is not Apple's fault or issue.

     

    And suggesting the new MacBook is crippled is a ridiculous comment at best.  Crippled how, exactly?  It has a low power processor...so you're not going to do heavy duty video processing or engineering computing.  Why would you think that it should do this?  The same thing is true for any PC's that are thin and light - they can't do what the bigger, faster, heavier laptops can.  Big surprise there, really. 




    Well stated.  Thanks for keeping it 1st class.

  • Reply 155 of 202
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,384member
    hillstones wrote: »
    It is an accurate analogy. You are too stupid to understand it. I guess you missed the part of the article that pointed out the flaws. Enjoy the Apple Kool-Aid. You are the fool that would buy the crippled MacBook instead of the better featured MacBook Pro 13 with retina for the same price. You are so fucking stupid, my analogy compared it to the MacBook Pro with retina, not the air, dipshit. Learn how to fucking read next time. Every post you make is full of misinformation.

    I've flagged your post and reported it to the mods. I'm "so fucking stupid"? Wow. Notice that in my post I went nowhere near that kind of disgusting, playground level personal attack, but instead attacked your analogy, using history and facts as tools. Obviously your point so so weak and misguided that you can do none of that, and have resort to words like "you are so fucking stupid" because I understand a product that you do not, and I might actually buy it, and that automatically defines me as a "fool" in your ridiculous ideology, even if I'm intimately aware of the other products Apple sells, and know what best serve my needs and usage. How judgemental, presumptuous, ignorant and petty. And no, not a word of my post was "misinformation" evidenced by the fact that you were unable to actually back up that claim beyond your filthy personal attacks.
  • Reply 156 of 202
    iaeeniaeen Posts: 588member
    hledgard wrote: »
    I really like the new MacBook, but would love to have some kind of data plan to use it anywhere, just like the iPad.

    Is there any way to do this?

    Tether data from your iPhone.

    They even added a continuity feature in OS X/iOS that lets you select you phone from the wifi menu without ever having to pull your phone out of your pocket to setup the hotspot.
  • Reply 157 of 202
    hledgardhledgard Posts: 265member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by iaeen View Post





    Tether data from your iPhone.



    They even added a continuity feature in OS X/iOS that lets you select you phone from the wifi menu without ever having to pull your phone out of your pocket to setup the hotspot.



    THANKS iaeen ! !

     

    I did not know this.  Knowledge helps people ! !

  • Reply 158 of 202
    eumaeuseumaeus Posts: 11member

    I love what I have seen from the new 12" MacBook. 

     

    It would be ideal for my mother, who wants an e-mail and web machine with a physical keyboard, and who will value a very clear screen on a very light computer over everything else. She is never going to plug it into an external monitor, massive 8-port USB hub, or anything else but power, and that only in the evening.

     

    It will be ideal for me, as a terminal, VIM, and browsing machine. When I'm on a network, it is always faster to ssh into my MacPro at home for doing fast compiles. If I'm on an airplane, this will suffice for work locally. I regularly edit some very large images (a 6 TB library of digitized medieval manuscripts, to be precise), but I find even a maxed-out 13" MBP less than ideal for that. 

     

    My one remaining concern was with the Core-M processor, but the data posted in this thread has set my mind at ease.

     

    I think this will sell in very good numbers, to the users with the most straightforward needs, and as an extremely attractive second computer for more advanced users. Think of all those articles  about developers adopting an all-iPad workflow. This is for them.

     

    And, anticipating getting mansplained about how much of a "fool" I am for not realizing the CRAZY POWARR!! I could get with some other machine... I have used an 11" Air, a 13" Pro, and a 13" Air over the course of the past few years. I have very, very clear and specific values in mind, and Apple has given me exactly the machine I was hoping for.

  • Reply 159 of 202
    bkkcanuckbkkcanuck Posts: 864member

    Slight correction on the article (it is confusing) but the 1.3 chip is actually out.  The 1.1Ghz chip is 5Y70.  The 5Y71 chip has a base frequency of 1.2 but it can be changed up to 1.4 (i.e. "Processor Base Frequency" is 1.2; "Configurable TDP-up Frequency" is 1.4; with a "Max Turbo Frequency" 2.9).  Apple has just moved the base to 1.3 in the build to order options.

  • Reply 160 of 202

    Misinformation posted in the thread in regards to virtualization in respect to the 5Y70 and the 5Y71.  

     

    BOTH processors support vitualization (VT-x, VT-D).... 

     

    http://ark.intel.com/products/84672/Intel-Core-M-5Y71-Processor-4M-Cache-up-to-2_90-GHz

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