Apple and IBM unveil 8 new MobileFirst iOS apps, new healthcare and industrial products categories

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  • Reply 21 of 30
    dick applebaumdick applebaum Posts: 12,507member
    mstone wrote: »
     


    Every person should definitely be allowed access to their own private medical records.


    They can get a printed copy if they make the request through the proper legal process. They cannot access the private hospital network EVER.


    EVER?

    I'll be 76 in August -- And I'm willing to bet I'll see the day where I can privately and securely access all my medical records on-ine.

    That does not mean that a hospital needs to make its private network available to public access.

    Rather, they could make a master synced copy of their records available on the cloud -- that provides private and secure access to those with proper credentials to access specific data!

    IBM already provides this capability!

    Why not for medical records?
  • Reply 22 of 30
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post



    Rather, they could make a master synced copy of their records available on the cloud -- that provides private and secure access to those with proper credentials to access specific data!

    We do this already with our X-ray data, but only between doctors, not patients. It is not like having direct access to the medical records either, it is a little like you would do with Dropbox or Google Drive, you can share selected data which is password protected.

  • Reply 23 of 30
    dick applebaumdick applebaum Posts: 12,507member
    [QUOTE][B][U][SIZE=4]Apple, Epic, IBM & Mayo Clinic: Personal Health Records Finally a Reality?[/SIZE][/U][/B]

    by Solve Healthcare | Jul 15, 2014 |

    [B]Apple, Epic, IBM & Mayo Clinic: Personal Health Records Finally a Reality?[/B]

    After continuous rumors and speculation, Apple finally announced their foray into Healthcare IT at their annual World Wide Developer’s Conference (WWDC) on June 2nd with the announcement of HealthKit and Health App for iOS 8.

    Apple’s HealthKit is the product of a [B][I] partnership between Epic Systems and Mayo Clinic [/I][/B] to establish a software framework allowing data from disparate applications to communicate with one other. [B][I] Epic and Mayo will also be introducing their own apps designed to help personalize and enhance patient engagement. [COLOR=blue]For Epic, this means enabling patients to securely view their “My Chart” Personal Health Record (PHR) from an iPhone, and for Mayo Clinic it means being able to monitor patient functions like blood pressure readings from wearable technology to determine whether the patient needs care and notifying their Provider. [/COLOR][/I][/B] Interestingly enough, Mayo Clinic does not use Epic Systems, they are currently using a combination of the GE and Cerner products.

    If you’re wondering how this works, HealthKit aggregates the information from different apps utilizing the HealthKit engine, such as data from Epic, Mayo Clinic, Nike, Fitbit, Jawbone and other sources. This information can be used as a proactive Clinical Decision Support (CDS) tool for healthcare providers, and a communication/repository tool for patients. There is also speculation that HealthKit and the Health App will play an integral part in the design of iWatch, Apple’s rumored first wearable technology.

    Today, Apple announced a strategic partnership with IBM, which further affirmed Apple’s aggressive plan to penetrate healthcare IT. In an interview with Information Week, IBM’s General Manager of Health Systems, Dan Pelino, said “This really is a case of ‘together, better’ — Apple was not in this space, just like IBM hasn’t been in mobile devices. IBM has the largest security practice in the world, allowing it to offer healthcare organization the assurance that their iOS applications will be security and in compliance with HIPAA privacy protections.” He also revealed that IBM is currently “under the covers in about 80% of Epic installations”.

    IBM and Epic are also partners in a bid for the Department of Defense’s DoD Healthcare Management Systems Modernization contract. This partnership will leverage Epic’s expertise in electronic health records (EHR) systems and healthcare organization management, while IBM will contribute its “system integration, change management, and operational expertise in delivering large-scale transformational solutions alongside complementary software and services providers.” Chief Medical Officer at IBM, Dr. Keith Salzman, will be leading the partnership with Epic, with over 20 years of experience in healthcare and medical informatics.

    [/QUOTE]
    [URL=http://solvehealthcare.com/apple-epic-ibm-mayo-clinic-personal-health-records-finally-a-reality/#.VRw3fS5upSU]http://solvehealthcare.com/apple-epic-ibm-mayo-clinic-personal-health-records-finally-a-reality/#.VRw3fS5upSU[/URL]
  • Reply 24 of 30
    dick applebaumdick applebaum Posts: 12,507member
    mstone wrote: »
    <span style="line-height:1.4em;">Rather, they could make a master synced copy of their records available on the cloud -- that provides private and secure access to those with proper credentials to access specific data!</span>
    We do this already with our X-ray data, but only between doctors, not patients. It is not like having direct access to the medical records either, it is a little like you would do with Dropbox or Google Drive, you can share selected data which is password protected.

    Others are already doing more ...

    I read somewhere that Epic has their EMR software installed in over 50% of US Hospitals ...

    Then, there's this:

    IBM, Apple & Epic: Health IT's Dream Team

    In Healthcare, It’s All About Mobility

    The alliance has some particularly promising implications for healthcare. Unlike other industries, Apple already has a strong foothold in healthcare – with 68% of providers using iPhones and 59% using iPads for professional purposes according to a survey by Black Book Rankings. However, these devices are currently widely underutilized and poorly integrated with core health information systems. The Apple/IBM partnership has tremendous potential to make the business of healthcare much more mobile.

    For example, most healthcare apps written for the iPad and iPhone to date have essentially been ports to desktop applications that haven’t taken full advantage of mobile platforms. IBM plans to change that by building a suite of applications specifically for iOS using its MobileFirst portfolio. This includes optimizing the mobile capabilities of the other major player in this equation — Epic Systems. Both Apple and IBM had an existing relationship with Epic prior to July 15, but according to Dan Pelino, IBM’s general manager of the public sector, efforts with Epic have accelerated and been more coordinated since the alliance.

    The goal is to create a true mobile link between providers and patients by combining the strengths of all three companies. This means a seamless, two-way exchange of health data. For example, the millions of patients whose medical history is currently managed by an Epic EHR will be able to access and interact with their health data via their mobile device using the Epic MyChart app. At the same time, IBM plans to build a suite of complementary apps that will allow data to be collected from a variety of medical and fitness devices (from glucose meters to Fitbits) and uploaded not only to a patient’s iPhone or iPad, but ultimately to their EMR as well. Once this data is in Epic, providers can manipulate it in a number of ways to improve patient outcomes.

    http://www.healthitoutcomes.com/doc/ibm-apple-epic-health-it-s-dream-team-0001
  • Reply 25 of 30
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post



    will be able to access and interact with their health data via their mobile device

    I think the words 'health data' should not be confused with 'medical records.'

     

    I have this already with my health provider. What I can see is appointments and prescriptions, message my doctor, see results of <some> lab tests.

     

    I cannot see diagnosis, treatments, conditions, X-rays, past medical conditions or any notes that a doctor may have entered into my medical records.

     

    A PHR may be separate from and does not normally replace the legal medical record of any provider.

  • Reply 26 of 30
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 31,087member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mstone View Post

     

    ...I cannot see diagnosis, treatments, conditions, X-rays, past medical conditions or any notes that a doctor may have entered into my medical records.


     

    There is no rational reason for this to be the reality today. Any and all personal medical information should be available to the patient concerned.

  • Reply 27 of 30
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

     

     

    There is no rational reason for this to be the reality today. Any and all personal medical information should be available to the patient concerned.


    There is but some of the information is considered too sensitive to host online and must be requested on a case by case basis through a legal request process.

  • Reply 28 of 30
    dick applebaumdick applebaum Posts: 12,507member
    mstone wrote: »
    will be able to access and interact with their health data via their mobile device
    I think the words 'health data' should not be confused with 'medical records.'

    I have this already with my health provider. What I can see is appointments and prescriptions, message my doctor, see results of <some> lab tests.

    I cannot see diagnosis, treatments, conditions, X-rays, past medical conditions or any notes that a doctor may have entered into my medical records.

    A PHR may be separate from and does not normally replace the legal medical record of any provider.


    I believe you are correct! And there are valid reasons for some (or most/all) of that data not being accessible.

    You don't want to put providers in the position of ..., well, akin to Hillary protecting, then deleting her emails.
  • Reply 29 of 30
    dick applebaumdick applebaum Posts: 12,507member
    mstone wrote: »
     
    <span style="line-height:1.4em;">...I cannot see diagnosis, treatments, conditions, X-rays, past medical conditions or any notes that a doctor may have entered into my medical records.</span>

    There is no rational reason for this to be the reality today. Any and all personal medical information should be available to the patient concerned.

    I think the issue is if all the data should be readily/casually available.

    If the data is too easily available, it could cause the provider to be less willing to record it -- or be vague about the details.
  • Reply 30 of 30
    mcdavemcdave Posts: 1,140member
    Does anyone know how the respective industries have responded to these apps?

    They sound like the things we'd hoped iPads would be used for but is 5 years too late? Did it give IT1.0 a chance to get their usual counter-productive hooks in?
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