First look: Digital Crown on Apple Watch ushers in new era of UI control

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  • Reply 21 of 111
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 3,526moderator
    [IMG ALT=""]http://forums.appleinsider.com/content/type/61/id/58388/width/350/height/700[/IMG]

    I'm sitting here playing with my new Watch and awkwardly taking pics of the screen with my iPhone when I recalled reading somewhere that you can do a screen capture by pressing both the button and the crown at the same time. The screen cap goes right to your iPhone photo album. Very cool!
  • Reply 22 of 111
    mechanicmechanic Posts: 805member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by foggyhill View Post

     

     

    Is the chip in the watch really an A5?




    No its an S1.  But the equivalent in processing power some are thinking to an A5

  • Reply 23 of 111
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    700

    I'm sitting here playing with my new Watch and awkwardly taking pics of the screen with my iPhone when I recalled reading somewhere that you can do a screen capture by pressing both the button and the crown at the same time. The screen cap goes right to your iPhone photo album. Very cool!

    How does this watch face look at 6:30? :D
  • Reply 24 of 111
    eriamjheriamjh Posts: 1,389member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Mechanic View Post

     



    No its an S1.  But the equivalent in processing power some are thinking to an A5




    It's an A5 core according to some reports, but that doesn't mean it's running at the original frequency of the A5 (800 Mhz in the 4S, 1Ghz in the iPad2).  It is likely a die-shrink compared to those and running even faster.  This would explain the fluidity of the interface.  

  • Reply 25 of 111
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    MG Siegler tweeted that he thinks ?Watch is a product that will be harder for the die-hards to use than regular folks. I agree. I'm seeing Tweets, Instagrams and other posts from average folks who seem to be loving the device. But the John Gruber's of the world are decidedly 'meh'. Same with the MacBook. Average Joe's that have it are much more positive about it than some of the reviews were.
  • Reply 26 of 111
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,355member
    cali wrote: »
    I hope this thing works well because it was the most stupid idea that was announced and made the watch look outdated.

    Sure, if you say so.
  • Reply 27 of 111
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 3,526moderator
    rogifan wrote: »
    How does this watch face look at 6:30? :D

    Even happier. Hahahaha
  • Reply 28 of 111
    gtrgtr Posts: 3,231member
    frugality wrote: »
    A knob.  Absolute genius.  What won't those folks in Cupertino think up next?  Buttons, maybe?  Oh, what a joyous time to be alive.  If only our great-grandparents could have seen these days....

    You must have been one of those 'the iPad is just a big iPhone' types. It is not just a knob.

    Quite frankly, during presentations of the watch I didn't give it a second thought. However, after using an Apple Watch in store I can quite easily say that the one thing that made the strongest impression on me was the digital crown. It works, quite literally, like magic.

    It is easily as impressive as the click wheel on the iPod, especially so on a device of this size.
  • Reply 29 of 111
    freediverxfreediverx Posts: 1,419member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by daveinpublic View Post



    Impressive piece of technology. ????



    Don't knock it till you try it.

     

    The digital crown takes a familiar control - the knob - and combines it with new technology and software to create something totally new. It works as both a button and a knob, and its functions can be extended depending on the task at hand just as the original iPhone's multitouch screen replaced physical buttons. Combined with the Watch's haptics feature, it can even mimic the physical sensation of a dial reaching the end of its control range. Nobody else has done this on a wrist-mounted device.

  • Reply 30 of 111
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by freediverx View Post

     



    Don't knock it till you try it.

     

    The digital crown takes a familiar control - the knob - and combines it with new technology and software to create something totally new. It works as both a button and a knob, and its functions can be extended depending on the task at hand just as the original iPhone's multitouch screen replaced physical buttons. Combined with the Watch's haptics feature, it can even mimic the physical sensation of a dial reaching the end of its control range. Nobody else has done this on a wrist-mounted device.


     

    Digital crowns are nothing new. Many watch companies had them 15-20 years ago where navigation and functions were controlled purely with a digital crown.

  • Reply 31 of 111
    desuserigndesuserign Posts: 1,316member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Kit_C View Post

    I had my "try on" session earlier this week, and my impression of the crown is that it's features have been softened up too much.  I have a number of mechanical watches, and the size of the Apple watch crown and depth of the gnurling seem insufficient.  I'm sure I will adapt to the digital crown, and that they Apple adapt it over time to make it more substantial.


    Maybe they kept it smaller to make it durable. The bigger it is the more torque can be applied by bumps etc. to bend the shaft. the opto-electrical target has to stay in good alighnment.

  • Reply 32 of 111
    freediverxfreediverx Posts: 1,419member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by WP7Mango View Post

     

     

    Digital crowns are nothing new. Many watch companies had them 15-20 years ago where navigation and functions were controlled purely with a digital crown.


     

    I'm not familiar with any such examples, but I'll take your word for it. (Link?) Nonetheless, many companies had touchscreens and tablets before the iPhone and the iPad but that didn't make them any less revolutionary. Apple rarely invents new technologies. They excel at finding the right time and implementation to change people's lives with those technologies. 

  • Reply 33 of 111
    freediverx wrote: »

    Don't knock it till you try it.

    The digital crown takes a familiar control - the knob - and combines it with new technology and software to create something totally new. It works as both a button and a knob, and its functions can be extended depending on the task at hand just as the original iPhone's multitouch screen replaced physical buttons. Combined with the Watch's haptics feature, it can even mimic the physical sensation of a dial reaching the end of its control range. Nobody else has done this on a wrist-mounted device.

    I was being serious.
  • Reply 34 of 111
    flaneurflaneur Posts: 4,526member
    kit_c wrote: »
    I had my "try on" session earlier this week, and my impression of the crown is that it's features have been softened up too much.  I have a number of mechanical watches, and the size of the Apple watch crown and depth of the gnurling seem insufficient.  I'm sure I will adapt to the digital crown, and that they Apple adapt it over time to make it more substantial.

    Maybe the size and knurling of the knob are reduced because there is no mechanical work being done.
  • Reply 35 of 111
    freediverxfreediverx Posts: 1,419member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post



    Maybe the size and knurling of the knob are reduced because there is no mechanical work being done.



    Also with a mechanical watch the crown may have a fair amount of resistance, requiring deeper knurling to ensure a secure grip. This applies double on dive watches where the crown must be screwed down tight after adjusting.

     

    Aside from this I think excessively deep knurling serves no practical function on an electronic watch, and Apple's design aesthetic is minimalistic and modern rather than industrial or traditional.

  • Reply 36 of 111
    gtrgtr Posts: 3,231member
    wp7mango wrote: »
    Digital crowns are nothing new.

    Where in the article did it claim that it was new?
  • Reply 37 of 111
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by GTR View Post





    Where in the article did it claim that it was new?

    The title.  Read the title.

  • Reply 38 of 111
    gtrgtr Posts: 3,231member
    frugality wrote: »
    The title.  Read the title.

    It's referring to a new ERA with the digital crown. Not a new digital crown.

    The piece even references the previous crowns that he mentions.
  • Reply 39 of 111
    desuserigndesuserign Posts: 1,316member
    gtr wrote: »
    It's referring to a new ERA with the digital crown. Not a new digital crown.

    The piece even references the previous crowns that he mentions.
    I'll buy that.
    The hardware isn't new (although it is improved,) but what it does definitely is both new and improved.
  • Reply 40 of 111
    tenlytenly Posts: 710member
    wp7mango wrote: »
    Digital crowns are nothing new. Many watch companies had them 15-20 years ago where navigation and functions were controlled purely with a digital crown.

    What? This is not new technology? Damn. If this has been done before I might as well just get one of those older devices. No doubt they're cheaper. I was just buying the Apple watch for the digital crown - thinking it was new and innovative. Thank you for clearing things up and letting me know it's not. This new information changes everything! I'm cancelling my order as I type this! /s
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