Apple to show 'the future of iOS and OS X' at WWDC June 8-12

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  • Reply 141 of 167
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Marvin View Post





    They don't crack you up and bring the house down? It seems like they would but people are probably divided over it.



    I've been through several large quakes and don't care to repeat the experience soon.

  • Reply 142 of 167
    mdriftmeyermdriftmeyer Posts: 7,503member
    satchmo wrote: »
    Sorry, but that's gotta be one of the uglier WWDC logo designs in recent memory.

    That aside, I'd love to see a new user interface for iOS.
    An alternative direction away from the row of icons (keep a 'classic view' option).
    The UI in it's current state is just not very usable in a 100+ app world. 

    Wasting time once more on an alternative UI is not a sound use of time.
  • Reply 143 of 167
    idreyidrey Posts: 647member
    The "epicenter" of the image is Apple TV. A logical conclusion is that a new Apple TV will be the epicenter of all of Apple's devices, and of its customers' lives.

    We may well see how PrimeSense 3D sensor technology will be used, plus support for 3rd party apps on Apple TV plus greatly expanded HomeKit support and products plus tighter integration of iOS, OS X, Apple TV, Apple Watch software.

    That's my thought too. New Apple TV will shake thing up!
  • Reply 144 of 167
    thepixeldocthepixeldoc Posts: 2,257member
    idrey wrote: »
    Thank you I'll try these. I did do a few things to it, but didn't solve the problem completely. After I installed mountain lion it started doing the random restart. It would do it like every four hour while on sleep mode. I looked online found a few things tried them and got it down to once a day. I even called apple but no fix. These links look very helpful thank you. And yes I am pretty new with Mac I only had Mac for about two years so is a learning prosses, I appreciate the help and time you took to get me the info ????

    Glad to be of help!

    Question: do you have a reason why you haven't upgraded to Yosemite?

    Apart from what a lot of people think of the new GUI... it is now quite (very!) stable at 10.10.3 and fast *IF* you decide to do a clean install. That might be at first a scary idea, but if you have a working, up-to-date Time Machine backup, it's a breeze. Even better if you have a spare drive to "clone" your present system to FIRST using Carbon Copy Cloner or SuperDuper just in case you want to go back to ML.

    I've been able to breath new life into some feeble older client hardware recently such as an MBP 13 Middle 2010 with only 4gb RAM, and an even older MBP 15 late 2009. Those were Core 2 Duo machines and woefully slow due to slow hard drives and low RAM configs.... but they're working all just fine on Yo!-It's-Yosemite!... :smokey:
  • Reply 145 of 167
    idreyidrey Posts: 647member
    Glad to be of help!

    Question: do you have a reason why you haven't upgraded to Yosemite?

    Apart from what a lot of people think of the new GUI... it is now quite (very!) stable at 10.10.3 and fast *IF* you decide to do a clean install. That might be at first a scary idea, but if you have a working, up-to-date Time Machine backup, it's a breeze. Even better if you have a spare drive to "clone" your present system to FIRST using Carbon Copy Cloner or SuperDuper just in case you want to go back to ML.

    I've been able to breath new life into some feeble older client hardware recently such as an MBP 13 Middle 2010 with only 4gb RAM, and an even older MBP 15 late 2009. Those were Core 2 Duo machines and woefully slow due to slow hard drives and low RAM configs.... but they're working all just fine on Yo!-It's-Yosemite!... :smokey:

    Oh no I'm up to date with Yosemite, but it was still rebooting. Sorry I didn't mention it. I try the spotlight trick and it did not reboot last nigh will see how it continues to act. I still think I follow your advise and clone the hard drive to reset the whole system. Thanks again big help! ????
  • Reply 146 of 167
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,686member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by ThePixelDoc View Post





    When you start up your Mac after a shutdown, all kinds of connections have to be rebuilt and connected, specifically these days to the internet***.



    As that is happening, a vast number of UNIX daemons are being reloaded, synced and a daily script (and possibly a monthly script as well) is being run to clean out it's cache, temp files and crud. The daily/monthly scripts are automatically set to run around 3:00 in the morning (last time I looked a few years back) on a hibernating Mac. If it can't run the scripts at that time, then it is forced to do so the next time the Mac boots.



    *** I've been using Little Snitch for years to monitor outgoing/incoming connections due to being stuck on a really bad Internet connection before moving a year ago to a location with broadband. I have many clients still stuck on ~2mb DSL and when I have their computers here for repairs and upgrades, when returning their Macs it's night and day when starting up.



    Note: It has occurred to me that with Yosemite, a number of the scripts or start-up routines have been put behind the start-up screen, rather than running after the desktop appears. If that's the case, and I'm only guessing that it is... I would sincerely hope that Microsoft copies this feature pronto!



    Every single PC user I know that does daily start-ups (all of them!)... start clicking around as soon as the desktop appears and wonder why everything is sooooo sloooow! I have to tell them it's because the PC isn't quite ready yet and it's still starting services (daemons), checking for updates... doing all kinds of disk-intensive stuff concurrently... that's why. (Besides being a ___!)



    I suggest turning the PC on, logging in... and then going to the bathroom, water your plants, get some coffee, make a sandwich, mow the lawn... then when you come back everything should be ready to go to get some "real work done" <-- /s. On a Mac: getting a coffee will suffice as wait time image



    ---



    I have to deal with this "problem" every day in obsessed "energy-saving Germany*.



    People are constantly being told in the media how much they are wasting on their power bills by not shutting off their electronics and leaving them on standby instead. I don't think there's a more dishonest, one-sided BS, misconception statement in all of tech(!) Especially when it comes to computers and specifically Macs with hibernation that actually works; as opposed to the Windows XP/7 problems of the past.



    I went apoplectic a couple of years ago when a popular TV program suggested that people should get power strips and plug all of their related electronics into it (stereo, TV, etc. into one; computer, monitor, printer, router, into another) and do a full power shutdown every night, and then flip it on again when they come home from work. There's probably not a worse piece of advice I think I've ever read or come across!!! There's many analogies, but the best I can give is it's like throwing a haymaker punch to the chin to put your stuff to sleep... and waking it all back up with an Ice-Bucket Challenge. Just: NO! image

    ^^^ THIS ^^^.



    Hmm, I dont agreee. Firstly those cleanup scripts can be useful, secondly the OS can wire down memory and get starved of other resources in some cases. Errant daemons can be cured of their problems by rebooting them, and the easiest way is to reboot ( or for user processes logout). 

  • Reply 147 of 167
    thepixeldocthepixeldoc Posts: 2,257member
    asdasd wrote: »

    Hmm, I dont agreee. Firstly those cleanup scripts can be useful, secondly the OS can wire down memory and get starved of other resources in some cases. Errant daemons can be cured of their problems by rebooting them, and the easiest way is to reboot ( or for user processes logout). 

    Just as a reminder: I was writing about boot-up times, and sleep/hibernation vs. shutting down every day.

    Clean-up scripts run automatically if you leave your computer in sleep/hibernation mode and your computer is in good health. SOME of the daemons will get cleaned on a restart... others like the weeklies won't necessarily, nor will caches or temp files "always" be cleaned. However, at some time they will run at the very same time as the daily scripts... which of course will take more time and appear to make your Mac start up slower than normal.

    I personally do a manual cleaning before and after every update, using Onyx, where you have to restart anyway. With a full daemon rebuild including dumping sytem, user, font caches, etc... it can take a few minutes. That's a small bit of what people are seeing when they restart every day.

    My little tips and tricks are by no means coming from an engineer that knows the deep internal workings of a UNIX machine. However, they do work for me and keep many a client up, running, and happy with their Macs. That's all I'm aiming for.
  • Reply 148 of 167
    satchmosatchmo Posts: 2,699member
    Wasting time once more on an alternative UI is not a sound use of time.

    Not a waste of time if usability is improved.
  • Reply 149 of 167
    s.metcalfs.metcalf Posts: 975member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by prokip View Post



    Why does it have to cost so much?



    Because Apple is a business.  It's popular and they'd have no trouble selling the tickets even if they charged more.

     

    Plus they only want real and serious developers to attend.  If they made it cheap or free you'd get a lot more amateurs wanting to go out of interest (or who might only want to go to the keynote) and using up the lottery spaces, thereby taking the places of real developers who'd get a lot more out of the sessions.

     

    Amateurs can still go of course, if they're serious enough to cough up that amount of money.

  • Reply 150 of 167
    s.metcalfs.metcalf Posts: 975member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by eightzero View Post

     

    But surely OSX 10.11 San Andreas would really shake things up.




    An earthquake could also be a disaster.  A major crack appearing in Apple's aura of invincibility.  Destroying everything you know and love and hold dear.

     

    Maybe Aperture was only the beginning?

  • Reply 151 of 167
    indyfxindyfx Posts: 321member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by GTR View Post





    You can call it ominous when the headline is "Apple to show 'the future of iOSX' at WWDC".



    Yeah I agree... "I do not think that word means what he think's it means." ;-)

  • Reply 152 of 167
    vuduvudu Posts: 28member
    What are the chances that a forward-delete gets added to the next iOS cut?

    The simple truth: on phone-sized devices, all these devices are slow you down.
    There is still a lot of improvement possible to make the iOS experience like Powdermilk Biscuits: expeditious.

    One hopes that the 2-step verification & other security features get the kinks ironed out.
    And perhaps there will be a succesor to Aperture.
  • Reply 153 of 167
    vuduvudu Posts: 28member

    Hey, hearing there’s a new version in the works is great,

    provided it still supports the aging 3rd party apps I run & don’t want to spend a fortune updating.



    Rather than worry about the logo for the conference,

    I’d rather someone concentrate on:

     

    • Making the menu bars in Safari distinguishable from the address field.

    • A professional successor to Aperture.

    • And forward-delete in iOS.

    • Improvement to the 2-step verification & older security scheme.

  • Reply 154 of 167
    jumpcutterjumpcutter Posts: 100member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

     
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacApfel View Post



    It's interesting that it is 'about the future of iOS and OS X' and not 'the future of OS X and iOS'. Cleary iOS became the prime focus for Apple.

     

    80% of their profits come from iOS




    I get really annoyed with short curt answers like this one. How in the world do you know this percentage of profit? Or are you talking out of your _ _ _.  If it is true, stay in the discussion and prove your point.

  • Reply 155 of 167
    freediverxfreediverx Posts: 1,423member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jumpcutter View Post

     

    I get really annoyed with short curt answers like this one. How in the world do you know this percentage of profit? Or are you talking out of your _ _ _.  These statements should not bother me but you Apple zealots really get under my skin with these off the cuff stupid statements. If it is true, stay in the discussion and prove your point.




    I couldn't find a source on profits by product line at a glance, but in case it might be helpful, here's a recent breakdown of Apple revenue by product line. According to this, the iPhone alone accounts for 68.6% of revenues and iOS (iPhone & iPad combined) comprise about 81%.

     

    So if one were to assume that their profit margins are equal across the board, then one might surmise these numbers also represent share of profits by product line. My guess is that Apple's margins are higher on the iPhone and iPad than on Macs and other products and services.

     

  • Reply 156 of 167
    sdbryansdbryan Posts: 351member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jumpcutter View Post

     



    I get really annoyed with short curt answers like this one. How in the world do you know this percentage of profit? Or are you talking out of your _ _ _.  These statements should not bother me but you Apple zealots really get under my skin with these off the cuff stupid statements. If it is true, stay in the discussion and prove your point.




    Apple is a publicly traded company. By law they have to disclose their financials accurately or someone goes to jail. If you are so curious about the specific number (80%) you shouldn't have a hard time finding it with google yourself. In any case it follows quite easily from the fact that iOS devices are on a much larger scale than OS X devices. Why do you find the statement stupid?

  • Reply 157 of 167
    freediverxfreediverx Posts: 1,423member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by sdbryan View Post

     



    Apple is a publicly traded company. By law they have to disclose their financials accurately or someone goes to jail. If you are so curious about the specific number (80%) you shouldn't have a hard time finding it with google yourself. In any case it follows quite easily from the fact that iOS devices are on a much larger scale than OS X devices. Why do you find the statement stupid?


     

     

    As far as I know, a publicly traded company is not required to break out profit margins for individual product lines. The shareholders need only know how the company is doing overall.

  • Reply 158 of 167
    sdbryansdbryan Posts: 351member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by freediverx View Post

     

     

     

    As far as I know, a publicly traded company is not required to break out profit margins for individual product lines. The shareholders need only know how the company is doing overall.




    I'm sure you are right specifically about distribution of profit. I was pointing towards the scale of iOS sales and suggesting the likely correlation to profit as you did in your post. If I had clicked to see page 5 of replies before replying myself and seen your reply I would not have bothered adding my two cents.

  • Reply 159 of 167
    freediverxfreediverx Posts: 1,423member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sdbryan View Post

     



    I'm sure you are right specifically about distribution of profit. I was pointing towards the scale of iOS sales and suggesting the likely correlation to profit as you did in your post. If I had clicked to see page 5 of replies before replying myself and seen your reply I would not have bothered adding my two cents.




    Regardless, I think your assumption was correct, and generally agreed upon by analysts. I thought there must be some specific data out there to support it but my 5 minute attention span expired before I found any. Regardless of the specific numbers, few knowledgeable people will argue against the notion that the iPhone makes up the lion's share of Apple's business and it's only natural that Apple's business strategy reflects that.

  • Reply 160 of 167
    jumpcutterjumpcutter Posts: 100member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by freediverx View Post

     
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jumpcutter View Post

     

    I get really annoyed with short curt answers like this one. How in the world do you know this percentage of profit? Or are you talking out of your _ _ _.  These statements should not bother me but you Apple zealots really get under my skin with these off the cuff stupid statements. If it is true, stay in the discussion and prove your point.




    I couldn't find a source on profits by product line at a glance, but in case it might be helpful, here's a recent breakdown of Apple revenue by product line. According to this, the iPhone alone accounts for 68.6% of revenues and iOS (iPhone & iPad combined) comprise about 81%.

     

    So if one were to assume that their profit margins are equal across the board, then one might surmise these numbers also represent share of profits by product line. My guess is that Apple's margins are higher on the iPhone and iPad than on Macs and other products and services.

     


    Thank you for the visual. It is not exactly what I was talking about but it is better than someone spouting off numbers  without  justification. Thank you. I am impressed.

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