Apple Watch wrist detection failing with some tattoos, users complain

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  • Reply 121 of 214
    apple ][apple ][ Posts: 9,233member

    What's next? Are tattooed peopled a protected group? A minority that demands that all technical and wearable products must be compatible with and function on tattooed people, no matter where or how much they are tattooed?

     

    Was their decision to get tattooed an individual and free choice that they made, and a choice that they will have to live with the consequences of (such as certain devices and wearables that are in contact with skin), or was their tattooing fetish born in the womb, and they had no choice to become what they are, like a gay person?<img class=" src="http://forums-files.appleinsider.com/images/smilies//lol.gif" /> 

  • Reply 122 of 214
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

     

    Tattoos have been around during Egyptian times, they are held in high regard in Polynesian culture, and have been held in high regards long before modern cultures took it and glorified it as some right-of-passage for the miscreants of society.


    In those instances I think it is appropriate as cultural traditions. Those customs take many years to develop and their body art is probably very similar to the art that historically would adorn their clothing, boats, homes, baskets and pottery. Modern, first world tattoos can't really be compared to those other cultures. Modern tattoos are a very recent fad, and I say fad, as I noticed from even just a couple years ago that fewer NBA players have tattoos these days than before.

  • Reply 123 of 214
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

     

     

    Apple needs to make an iPhone for blind people? 


    I've heard from a reliable source that iPhone is the preferred phone for the blind, at least in the US.

  • Reply 124 of 214
    ciacia Posts: 155member


     

    I never said that ALL tattoo wearers are criminals.



    But, if it looks like a duck, if it quacks like a duck - well, odds are better than fair that it may be a duck.



    If you wish to disfigure your body, that's your choice. Just don't demand that everyone else "respect" your foolishness. The topics of discussion that happen after you leave are seldom flattering, if ever.



    Again, because people just are ignoring the basics .... no tattoo you can get will ever make anyone think more of you, at best you will break even - but typically people will think less of you.



    Any idiot with $10 can get ink. Getting a tattoo doesn't prove anything, it isn't heroic, it isn't an act of bravery - one could argue the opposite that it's cowardice in going along with the low IQ herd. Face it, there aren't a lot of Mensa members in the MI-13, ex-con, bikers and other tattoo group memberships. You made the conscious decision to join that group - howl all you like. It was your choice, not mine.

     



    It's this narrow minded thinking that makes me very worried about the state of the world.    It's the same problem that you see with religion:  "If you don't think the way I think, you will burn for eternity in hell!"

     

    No, I won't burn for eternity, but good luck with that line of thought.     While I don't think less of someone without a tattoo, I think more of people who get them.  They are when well done, art and expression.   Granted there are some terrible tattoos but just because you got one doesn't make you a bad person.

     

    You want generalized statements?  People like you live in the mid-west, would consider yourself god-fearing and religious. You are probably republican,  and can't stand the Obama presidency.    You have zero tolerance for LGBT people.     There's a generalized statement that's probably true.

  • Reply 124 of 214
    mstone wrote: »
    sflocal wrote: »
     
    <span style="line-height:1.4em;">Tattoos have been around during Egyptian times, they are held in high regard in Polynesian culture, and have been held in high regards long before modern cultures took it and glorified it as some right-of-passage for the miscreants of society.</span>
    In those instances I think it is appropriate as cultural traditions. Those customs take many years to develop and their body art is probably very similar to the art that historically would adorn their clothing, boats, homes, baskets and pottery. Modern, first world tattoos can't really be compared to those other cultures. Modern tattoos are a very recent fad, and I say fad, as I noticed from even just a couple years ago that fewer NBA players have tattoos these days than before.


    For better -- or for worse ... a visible tattoo is distracting.

    And I can envision cases for the better.


    On a somewhat related note -- body piercings.

    My 19-y-o granddaughter has a nose piercing -- a small round pin about the size of a BB. It is quite attractive -- but she's always fiddling with it (which is not).

    Friday, I synced an Apple Watch to her iPhone -- so she could run it thru its paces ...

    Last night she was sitting on the couch scrolling through her messages on the watch -- while fiddling with her nose pin ...

    I swear, it looked like she was trying to use the nose-pin as a replacement for the digital crown on the watch ;)
  • Reply 126 of 214
    terun78terun78 Posts: 36member
    You're wearing your tattoo wrong!
  • Reply 127 of 214
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 5,022member
    Not sure if anyone pointed this out but tatoo inks are usually made with metals and oxides which can mess with light and optical readings so this should be no surprise. This is also why laser tattoo removal hurts so much when the laser hits the ink and breaks it up.
  • Reply 128 of 214
    sol77sol77 Posts: 203member

    Oh my god, what a bunch of sissies. Tattoos are literally harmless, and the only negative to them is that you might later think, "that's not what I want."

     

    Oh god no!!!! Please, not that! 

     

    Meanwhile, 70% of Americans are overweight, 80% of Americans don't get enough exercise, nearly 40% of Americans don't get the doctor recommended amount of sleep. Every last one of these is by choice, barring some hormonal imbalance.... Let's see...how many of you "my body is a temple" posers does that include?

     

    ...and you fatsos have sticks up your butts about ink pictures on skin? Jesus. Christ.

     

    My favorite line was, "I have never seen a tattoo that made me think more of someone." Interesting! I've never seen a haircut that made me think more of someone. We should get together and TALK DEEP THOUGHTS about it!

     

    Get a real cause, bozos.

  • Reply 129 of 214
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post



    Not sure if anyone pointed this out but tatoo inks are usually made with metals and oxides which can mess with light and optical readings so this should be no surprise. This is also why laser tattoo removal hurts so much when the laser hits the ink and breaks it up.



    Someone did point out that the inks contain sometimes even heavy metals, which to me seems like it could present a health risk if those elements eventually dissolved into the blood. 

  • Reply 130 of 214
    websnapwebsnap Posts: 224member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Hodar View Post



    ugh ... Hair loss and tattoo removal ... you actually are comparing those two items?



    Gee, are tattoos a genetic trait?

     

    The issue wasn’t if it was a genetic trait or not, but rather there is always an industry built off shaming people. For some it’s the baldness pattern, for others it is tattoos – society shames people for not fitting into a desired “look” – and that I wouldn’t put too much weight on it’s societal importance just by it’s virtue of “being”.

     

    Quote:


    My statement stands ... I have never seen a tattoo that makes me think MORE of someone for having it.


     

     Fair enough, I haven’t thought much of people’s tattoos beyond “is it ugly” (that’s the designer in me) or is it misspelt (that’s the jerk in me).



     

    Quote:


    There is a reason you see losers with tattoos (ex-cons, felons, unemployable parasites, gang members, thugs, bikers, high school drop-outs who are trying to look tough ....). They have no respect for themselves, their bodies; and are vandalizing their bodies in an attempt to persuade others that they are worthwhile.


     

    I’ve seen the same people without tattoos – my comment stands – a tattoo is fictional barometer for the type of people you are referring to, since they also exist without tattoos. I have a tattoo, many of my friends have tattoos – and none of us are criminals, we have not only degrees but very well paying careers in various fields and while I am not many of my friends are very health conscious and most likely treat it better than you do (because they treat their bodies way better than average, I think it’s a safe guess).



     

    Quote:


    That's probably why your parents tried to teach you NOT to get a tattoo when you were a kid. Truth hurts.


     

    My mom hated the idea, then she saw it and now loves it – because she knows I’m not a criminal and now knows others may not be either. 

  • Reply 131 of 214
     
    [QUOTE]Let's take this to the big leagues. It's late October in 2016. Two presidential candidates are standing behind a podium, debating each other. Both wear watches. How many politics junkies recall President George HW Bush's watch glance during his debate with Bill Clinton? That was a costly mistake.

    In any case, this is 2016. The candidate (we'll just pick one for now) is on stage, answering debate questions. She starts answering a question, but gets a tap-tap on the wrist. That's the signal to change the subject. She does, and avoids a potentially dangerous trap her staff noticed, but she didn't while in the thick of the debate.

    Later in the debate, the candidate is making a very strong point on economic policy. She knows she's on a roll, but doesn't see the live tracking polls, which say the audience is losing interest. Tap-tap-tap-tap. She immediately brings that answer to a conclusion, and doesn't lose the audience.[/QUOTE]

    http://www.zdnet.com/article/how-apples-wrist-taps-could-be-a-game-changer/#ftag=RSSbaffb68
  • Reply 132 of 214
    usb-usb- Posts: 22member

    Wow. So much judgment in one thread. You guys need to chill

     

    Anywho, a good price for tattoo removal is about $60 per square inch. A tattoo large enough to block the Apple Watch's sensors would probably have to be about 4 square inches, or 2x2. So you're talking almost $250 just to get the tat removed so you can go ahead and spend at least another $350 on an accessory that you don't really need. I think this is more of Apple's problem than the customers'.

  • Reply 133 of 214

    I mostly tattooed, very little skinny left thats not, and I work for a christian company.. They aren't as judgmental as some of these idiots in here.. btw, LEV 19:28 never ORIGINALLY said anything about tattoos on live people, only the dead.. Stop hiding behind your bibles.. and actually learn it..

  • Reply 134 of 214
    pscooter63pscooter63 Posts: 1,059member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Sol77 View Post



    Get a real cause, bozos.

     

    People have enshrined their personal choices in the name of culture for a great while now. 

     

    Don't get offended when practical shortcomings are pointed out, because, just maybe, folks are pointing out the factually obvious... something you should be secure enough in your own convictions to accept.

     

    Thicken your own skin.

  • Reply 135 of 214
    ciacia Posts: 155member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

     

     

    No.  The poster said he wants to hire people who don't give a crap about how others view them.




    Which I have zero problem with.   I was at the Apple Store in the City Creek Mall in SLC, UT dropping off my iMac for repair.  This mall is owned by the Mormon Church.  While I was waiting, near me, there was a sales person with wild hair reminiscent of 1980's Robert Smith from "The Cure", but with his face covered in pink glitter and lipstick.  

     (Robert Smith photo)

    He was helping a older, maybe 50's woman choose an iPhone.  He was polite, courteous, and friendly. He also stood out like a sore thumb.  First thought in my mind was YES APPLE!  Thank you for hiring someone who has no fear expressing themselves in public.  Especially in a mormon owned mall.  I'd go back there again for that reason.

  • Reply 136 of 214
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by terun78 View Post



    You're wearing your tattoo wrong!

    http://www.theworldofchinese.com/2013/11/chinese-tattoos-gone-wrong/

     

    This is a really funny page. 

  • Reply 137 of 214
    diegogdiegog Posts: 134member
    Way to cut the sentence out of the context of the entire post to make a point that I wasn't even referencing.

    sog35 wrote: »
    So does human sacrifice.

    Not saying tattoo is the same as human sacrifice.  I'm just saying just because something existed BEFORE modern religion does not mean it acceptable.
  • Reply 138 of 214
    hodarhodar Posts: 338member
    Intelligent people judge.

    And I'm sure you do to. If you see a group of people in an alley all bearing tattoos, do you go down that alley, or do you avoid it? In my area - you go out of your way to avoid it, because you are entering an dangerous neighborhood. Is that judgmental? You bet it is - it's also how I have managed not to be mugged, beaten and robbed.

    Tattoos are often used as gang symbols, they are recognition symbols for prisons, drug cartels and are sometimes used as "badges" to chronicle one's life in the prison system.

    So, do I judge a person who voluntarily inks himself? Absolutely. If I see a car salesman with ink on his hands - I pass. Real Estate Agent - not interested. Insurance agent - forget it. That person has identified himself to me, as someone I should not trust.

    There are plenty of untrustworthy un-tattooed people; but if I were to take a cross-section of the tattooed population and a cross-section of the un-inked - I believe I would be safer among the un-inked. Getting a tattoo proves absolutely nothing, other than a short-sighted person without respect for their body.

    Want examples? Go to a Homeless shelter, an unemployment line, a half-way house and look for yourself. Over 80% of these fine outstanding examples of humanity are covered in ink. If you opt to associate yourself with these people - that's your choice.

    I could be like you; all it would take is $50, a partial lobotomy and 20 minutes of my life. Unfortunately, for you to be like me will cost you thousands, and take you months of agony.
  • Reply 139 of 214
    Actually, Pharrell had full sleeve tattoos but had an experimental skin graft in 2009, further proving the Apple Watch has been in production since Jobs.

    Better get some new arms, people.

    http://www.therichest.com/expensive-lifestyle/entertainment/celebrities-that-removed-their-tattoo-mistakes/2/
  • Reply 140 of 214
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,612moderator
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12456900

    "Tattooing was significantly associated with living in a single-parent household, and lower socioeconomic status, peer substance use. Adjusting for sociodemographic factors and peer substance use, tattooing in adolescents was independently and significantly associated with reported sexual intercourse, substance use, violent behaviors, and school problems.
    CONCLUSION:
    Permanent tattoos are strongly associated with high-risk behaviors among adolescents. In the clinical setting, the presence of a tattoo noted during clinical examination of an adolescent should prompt in-depth assessment for a variety of high-risk behaviors."

    http://blogs.riverfronttimes.com/dailyrft/2010/01/new_study_heavily-tattooed_people_more_prone_to_deviant_behavior.php
    https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20100811053253AA0pSeg

    "Comprehensive studies performed in Denmark, revealed the following enlightening statistics concerning tattoos:
    • 42% of homes for short-term detentioned were tattooed
    • 60% of homes for young men with behavior difficulties
    • 72% of prisons for young men
    • 52% of prisons population
    The same Denmark studies also disclosed less than 4.8 in the general population were tattooed."
    (Ronald Scutt, Art, Sex and Symbol, 1974)"

    http://scholarlycommons.law.northwestern.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5547&context=jclc

    "The conclusion seems warranted that psychopathy or social or emotional maladjustment is significantly higher among tattooed than among non-tattooed men."
    "The high incidence of alcoholism and law breaking among these men (tattooed) seems to indicate that they are socially unbalanced."

    Ok so let's see which members of the forum have tattoos, *writes names down*.

    This must be the ?Watch class system at work. Rumors of Apple not hiring felons for construction and now blocking them from the watch.

    The studies and people's experience highlight correlation but as is often the case, it gets turned into causation. It's like torrenting, Bitcoins, Tor. Using these things doesn't make someone a criminal, there's just a high correlation between those things and criminal behavior so people get tarnished by association.
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