Sales of 53M iPhones in June quarter predicted to help propel Apple stock to $170, Brean Capital say

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 35
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,002member
    lkrupp wrote: »
    AAPL slip sliding away with the rest of the market this past week. Chinese markets in retreat today. Greece fails, if the EU collapses you can kiss $170 goodby. You might even kiss $100 goodby. And of course your IRA is toast, no more $500 to spend on a watch.

    Horse crap. Greece has a combined GDP of < the state of Washington. You're deluded if you think it failing will crash Wall Street.

    What do expect from a country whose exports are olives and yogurt? :lol:
  • Reply 22 of 35
    fallenjtfallenjt Posts: 4,050member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

     

    AAPL slip sliding away with the rest of the market this past week. Chinese markets in retreat today. Greece fails, if the EU collapses you can kiss $170 goodby. You might even kiss $100 goodby. And of course your IRA is toast, no more $500 to spend on a watch.


    You live in Midwest and I understand your feeling...well just like when Detroit auto business slump which hit entire Midwest. But this is Apple, a company that have more cash than US government at one time. So, I'm holding my stocks until it hit $140...likely holiday season this year.

  • Reply 23 of 35
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by revenant View Post

     

    mostly unrelated, but not totally-- apple watch is in a slump?

     

    http://www.macrumors.com/2015/07/07/apple-watch-demand-slides-june-slice/


     

    A idiocy, how do they get info from the Apple Store were Apple started selling at the same time as the "slump". I'm not even mentioning how dubious their methodology is in the first place.

  • Reply 24 of 35
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,362member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by revenant View Post

     

    mostly unrelated, but not totally-- apple watch is in a slump?

     

    http://www.macrumors.com/2015/07/07/apple-watch-demand-slides-june-slice/


     

    Even if the data wasn't horse-shit (which it most probably is) they're basically extrapolating a "slump" from a couple weeks of data, completely meaningless. A shitload of people travel in June/July, and money is directed to things related to that instead of an Apple Watch, for example. Has no bearing on future sales. 

  • Reply 25 of 35
    drunkzombiedrunkzombie Posts: 169member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by revenant View Post

     

    mostly unrelated, but not totally-- apple watch is in a slump?

     

    http://www.macrumors.com/2015/07/07/apple-watch-demand-slides-june-slice/


     

    Market Watch has to be the most anti Apple site right now.

  • Reply 26 of 35
    This Morning's news -


    [SIZE=4][COLOR=blue]Microsoft writes off $7.6 billion from Nokia deal, announces 7,800 job cuts[/COLOR][/SIZE]

    By Tom Warren
    on July 8, 2015 09:08 am

    Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella didn't waste any time dropping the company's previous focus on "devices and services" after he was appointed as chief executive last year. In recent weeks former Nokia CEO Stephen Elop has departed Microsoft, alongside the company's head of phones Jo Harlow. Nadella warned of "tough choices in areas where things are not working," and it appears we're seeing the first major signs of that today. Microsoft is cutting 7,800 jobs primarily in its phone business, and the company is writing off $7.6 billion related to its acquisition of the Nokia phone business.

    The new job cuts follow 18,000 over the past 12 months that Nadella originally announced nearly a year ago. Microsoft completed the majority of those cuts back in April, so these new reductions are part of the company's new financial year.


    [SIZE=4][CENTER]I'm thinking someone will soon be leaving the phone business[/CENTER][/SIZE]
  • Reply 27 of 35
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    ^^^ Yep. Microsoft will be out of the phone biz and they'll continue the layoffs.
  • Reply 28 of 35
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,453member
    Greece itself isn't the issue, it's the impact a Greek exit has on the wider EU that will affect stock prices and Apples prospects.
  • Reply 29 of 35
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    crowley wrote: »
    Greece itself isn't the issue, it's the impact a Greek exit has on the wider EU that will affect stock prices and Apples prospects.

    Either way you look at it, the EU is finished. That Greece can be allowed to blackmail the other countries is proof the system is a failure. If Greece leaves both the EU and the Euro and manages to default without repaying, Spain, Rome and other wobbling debtors will follow. If Greece stays, their debts will still be massive, unless they are forgiven a huge part of that debt, in which case those other 'wobblers' will again follow Greece's lead. Greece and the other unstable countries should never have been allowed into the EU.
  • Reply 30 of 35
    jfc1138jfc1138 Posts: 3,090member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by foggyhill View Post

     

     

    A idiocy, how do they get info from the Apple Store were Apple started selling at the same time as the "slump". I'm not even mentioning how dubious their methodology is in the first place.




    From what I can gather you have to decide to install their APP for some reason or another and then they get to send you emails about what you've bought?

     

    Yeah that's going to yield an accurate sales picture: NOT.

  • Reply 31 of 35
    hmmhmm Posts: 3,405member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

     

    AAPL slip sliding away with the rest of the market this past week. Chinese markets in retreat today. Greece fails, if the EU collapses you can kiss $170 goodby. You might even kiss $100 goodby. And of course your IRA is toast, no more $500 to spend on a watch.


     

    Then sit on AAPL. You can't expect things to just go up every time without correction. Over the long term it has increased and drastically outpaced inflation.

  • Reply 32 of 35
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,453member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post





    Either way you look at it, the EU is finished. That Greece can be allowed to blackmail the other countries is proof the system is a failure. If Greece leaves both the EU and the Euro and manages to default without repaying, Spain, Rome and other wobbling debtors will follow. If Greece stays, their debts will still be massive, unless they are forgiven a huge part of that debt, in which case those other 'wobblers' will again follow Greece's lead. Greece and the other unstable countries should never have been allowed into the EU.

    Even if those are the only two options, which isn't true, it hardly makes the EU "finished".

  • Reply 33 of 35



    Its not the impact of Greeces economy thats the issue. Its the fact that if Greece can just walk away from its debt, so can Spain, Italy, The UK, Luxembourg, The Netherlands, Belgium, France, Austria, Denmark.........thats almost half the EU and Im not even finished........Hungary, Ireland, Portugal, Croatia and Finland. They all have a debt to GDP percentage of more than 99%. The most is a whopping 3,443%.

  • Reply 34 of 35
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,834moderator
    Its not the impact of Greeces economy thats the issue. Its the fact that if Greece can just walk away from its debt, so can Spain, Italy, The UK, Luxembourg, The Netherlands, Belgium, France, Austria, Denmark.........thats almost half the EU and Im not even finished........Hungary, Ireland, Portugal, Croatia and Finland. They all have a debt to GDP percentage of more than 99%. The most is a whopping 3,443%.

    It's the net external debt that's important, not gross external debt so high percentages for gross debt don't mean a country is in bad shape. Countries owe debts to each other so you have to take the difference between assets and liabilities to figure out which nations are creditors and debtors. Click the NIIP% by GDP at the following link:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Net_international_investment_position

    Luxembourg with 3443% gross debt is a net creditor nation because they are into banking. The combined Eurozone has a net external debt lower than the US. Cyprus is down the bottom and had similar problems to Greece a couple of years ago where people lost something like 40% of their bank savings if they had over 100k euros. People in Greece are afraid the same will happen to them so are trying to spend their savings to buy goods that will retain their value but of course the banks are trying to stop them withdrawing the money:

    http://www.cnbc.com/id/102819817

    A significant part of the problem with the way the economic system functions is how people disproportionately value work and services and who is in control of how it works. The way Greece covered up the borrowing was with fraudulent activity by the banking institutions. The same ones that messed up the mortgages:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/14/business/global/14debt.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

    That article was from 5 years ago. These untouchables can go around doing as much fraudulent activity and it's the masses of low paid workers who pay the price for it while the employees at these institutions get obscene bonuses for doing it. Should Greek workers be able to retire on state pensions before 61 after 20-30 years of work? Should people from Goldman Sachs be able to retire as millionaires within 1-3 years of working from helping perpetuate a fraud that destroys an entire country? People are quick to condemn low earners and congratulate people who get rich quick as if somehow the value of the work of one of them is vastly higher than the other.

    There was someone on the forum from Portugal who mentioned the poor economy there. Portugal is 3rd bottom on the NIIP list. If that person did the exact same job in a country that was doing better economically then they'd have a better quality of life so where does the fault lie? When you put aside the financial terms like credit/debt/bankruptcy, it's fundamentally a balance between quality of life and contribution. Excessive debt and bankruptcy means that people are living a perceived better quality of life than their contribution to other people. But it's just a consensus that is deciding the values of both quality of life and contribution along with a monetary system that is controlled by the banking institutions that are deciding debt repayment rates, currency exchange rates and so on.

    What is the desired fallout (or punishment) for someone deemed to have an excessive quality of life relative to their contribution? For someone at Goldman Sachs or anyone else who figures out how to overvalue their work, there is no fallout. The fallout some people would expect at the low-end is destitution:


    http://rt.com/news/greece-suicide-218/

    Mass unemployment, poverty, suicide, emigration (emigration, which people would try to block). Is that vindication for their perceived wrongdoing of being a certain percentage in debt to other nations? If they were criminals, they wouldn't be treated like that.

    Income inequality gets dismissed by the same people who worry about stock holdings fluctuating because of what's happening with all the poor people. Gee, where did all the poor people come from? It surely can't be from paying below a living wage, denying healthcare, education and lowering social mobility, it must be their fault so who let them in the door? If people made an effort to actually follow enlightened self-interest, those poor people wouldn't be poor and the whole economy would be more stable.

    Greece may eventually have to use another currency but they don't have to manufacture the currency any more. They can use a digital currency that works from mobile phones. This would have a value lower than the Euro so for example, everyone with 100,000 Euros in the Greek banks would instead have 100,000 digital Drachmas. If this digital currency was worth say 75% of the Euro then they'd only really have 75k Euros but it wouldn't matter much internally to the country, it would have the most impact on quality of life if they left the country. If they managed to improve the GDP or lower the debt, they could then return to the Euro. The Euro should perhaps have a lower value currency component e.g Euro-A, which gets applied to countries in severe debt and allows them to work their way back out of it.
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