Apple Pay adoption and usage rates suffer despite strong iPhone 6 sales, study finds

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  • Reply 101 of 140
    solipsismysolipsismy Posts: 5,099member
    godrifle wrote: »
    In my experience, ApplePay just fails to work too often, and is accepted in far too many locations. The end result of that is that I have to carry my cards. If I have to carry my cards, and ApplePay is flakey, I might as well just swipe, as it is (in my experience) much faster.

    1) Of course you have to carry your cards still. Why would you think you wouldn't have to at this point?

    2) Flakey in what way? I've had no issues with places that accept Apple Pay.
  • Reply 102 of 140
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,424member
    solipsismy wrote: »
    Come on! It's been almost a year so this "Google Wallet is the same as Apple Pay" crap needs to stop.
    !
    I agree that they are not the same. I said as much myself. Those that claim they are should stop just as you say. But they are much more alike than different.
  • Reply 103 of 140
    croprcropr Posts: 1,078member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mstone View Post

     

    It helps in a couple of ways.

    1) The retailer does not have your name linked to what you bought.

    2) Your card data is not stored on their servers for hackers steal.


    I don't know where you got these ideas about e-payments fraud, but they can definitely be improved.  The major source of e-payment fraud is not the retailer, but the customer.  If the retailer is eventually not paid by the bank because of fraud by the customer, it is very difficult for the retailer to recuperate the goods or services he sold, especially if the retailer does not have the name of the customer

     

    Therefor,  the retailer must get the pubic information of the customer: his name,  the last 4 digits of the credit card number and the expiry date, but the retailer must not get any security related information like the CVC code, any authorization tokens, ..., or he would be able to abuse the customers' payment data.

     

    The first point you are making just increases the fraud risk.   The second point is in most cases irrelevant: the IT system behind a Point of Sales is seldom reachable from the Internet

  • Reply 104 of 140
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cropr View Post

     

    I don't know where you got these ideas about e-payments fraud, but they can definitely be improved.  The major source of e-payment fraud is not the retailer, but the customer.  If the retailer is eventually not paid by the bank because of fraud by the customer, it is very difficult for the retailer to recuperate the goods or services he sold, especially if the retailer does not have the name of the customer


    I'm not sure what the laws are in your country but in the US if the card is approved then the retailer gets paid. If the the purchase was fraudulent then the bank makes good on the transaction anyway. Here we also have prepaid credit cards with no name on the card.

     

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by cropr View Post

     

    The second point is in most cases irrelevant: the IT system behind a Point of Sales is seldom reachable from the Internet


    I'll refer you to this web page that lists the 20 biggest retailer data breeches of 2014.

     

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/moneybuilder/2015/01/13/the-big-data-breaches-of-2014/

  • Reply 105 of 140
    ipenipen Posts: 410member

    Maybe I'll try Apple pay when I upgrade to iphone 6.  For now, cash is still the king, accepted everywhere, even for the poors on the street.  And no worry for credit card number and private info being stolen.

  • Reply 106 of 140
    sirlance99sirlance99 Posts: 1,280member
    supersalo wrote: »
    The amount of iPhone 6 owners who don't use TouchID is astounding. I'm betting that this is the number one reason for the "usage rate suffering".

    Some people just don't like it or it doesn't work for them how they like. Mine works perfectly on my iPhone 6 Plus but my girlfriend doesn't use Apple Pay or touchid because it rarely works for her. Just doesn’t want to deal with it anymore. There are a ton of people who do that.
  • Reply 107 of 140
    My use of Apple Pay at Panera, Schnucks grocery, Walgreens - my top 3 shopping locations succeeds 100% of the time. Works fine with iPhone 6 and now with my Apple Watch.
  • Reply 108 of 140
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,363member
    Quote:



    Originally Posted by mstone View Post

     

    I'm pretty sure in most countries your are suppose to carry physical identification.


    Wait, what?  I'm pretty sure in most countries you don't have to carry a damn thing.  You have to carry identification in the States?  When did that happen?

  • Reply 109 of 140
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,002member
    crowley wrote: »
    [CONTENTEMBED=/t/187504/apple-pay-adoption-and-usage-rates-suffer-despite-strong-iphone-6-sales-study-finds/80#post_2757525 layout=inline]Quote:[/CONTENTEMBED]
    mstone wrote: »
     
    I'm pretty sure in most countries your are suppose to carry physical identification.
    Wait, what?  <span style="line-height:1.4em;">I'm pretty sure in most countries you don't have to carry a damn thing.  You have to carry identification in the States?  When did that happen?</span>

    Vagrancy laws
  • Reply 110 of 140
    godriflegodrifle Posts: 267member
    Quote:



    Originally Posted by SolipsismY View Post





    1) Of course you have to carry your cards still. Why would you think you wouldn't have to at this point?



    2) Flakey in what way? I've had no issues with places that accept Apple Pay.

     

    1) Let me restate my point:

     

    The necessity of carrying cards due to low availability of ApplePay at retailers, coupled with a problematic user experience (for me), leads to me to personally dismiss Apple Pay for having poor utility. Thus, I've not adopted it as a primary payment method, contributing to low usage by me. Perhaps others have this experience and outcome too. This may explain the point of the article.

     

    2) Flakey in the way that — for example — forced me to break out my Discover card at (of all places) the Chicago Apple Store on Michigan Ave. last week after the Apple employee tried to get a read five or six times. Congrats on your flawless experience. Mine's not been nearly that way. And from the comments of the Apple Store employee in Chicago, on these boards, and elsewhere, it's not been stellar for others either.

  • Reply 111 of 140
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

     

    Wait, what?  I'm pretty sure in most countries you don't have to carry a damn thing.  You have to carry identification in the States?  When did that happen?




    When driving anywhere in the world you need to carry your drivers license although in some countries and states you could present it later if you didn't have it, but you can save yourself some aggravation if you carry it with you should a police officer ask for it. Anyway, that is why I used the drivers license in my example.

     

    In Panama, my other residence, you are required to have in your possession either a passport if a visitor or a cedula (Panama photo ID 18 years or older) at ALL times.

     

    Quote: Wikipedia

     According to a 1996 document by Privacy International, around 100 countries had compulsory identity cards


  • Reply 112 of 140

    Has she tried registering fingerprints while holding the phone like she normally does?

     

    If you lay the phone on a table and register your prints, then the phone is going to have a harder time recognizing your fingerprint when you try to unlock the phone while holding it.

     

    Quote:


    Some people just don't like it or it doesn't work for them how they like. Mine works perfectly on my iPhone 6 Plus but my girlfriend doesn't use Apple Pay or touchid because it rarely works for her. Just doesn’t want to deal with it anymore. There are a ton of people who do that.


  • Reply 113 of 140



    Did the iPhone not detect the NFC register, or was it a case of the iPhone not recognizing your fingerprint?

     

    Quote:


    2) Flakey in the way that — for example — forced me to break out my Discover card at (of all places) the Chicago Apple Store on Michigan Ave. last week after the Apple employee tried to get a read five or six times. Congrats on your flawless experience. Mine's not been nearly that way. And from the comments of the Apple Store employee in Chicago, on these boards, and elsewhere, it's not been stellar for others either.


  • Reply 114 of 140
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,363member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mstone View Post

     



    When driving anywhere in the world you need to carry your drivers license although in some countries and states you could present it later if you didn't have it, but you can save yourself some aggravation if you carry it with you should a police officer ask for it. Anyway, that is why I used the drivers license in my example.

     

    In Panama, my other residence, you are required to have in your possession either a passport if a visitor or a cedula (Panama photo ID 18 years or older) at ALL times.

     




    Well you learn something new every day.  Though driving is a special case that I think most people can see the reasoning behind, the national identity card thing is an eye opener.

     

    100 is not "most" countries though :P

  • Reply 115 of 140
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    crowley wrote: »

    Well you learn something new every day.  Though driving is a special case that I think most people can see the reasoning behind, the national identity card thing is an eye opener.

    100 is not "most" countries though :P

    According to Google there are 196 countries so more than half require an ID.
  • Reply 116 of 140
    tbelltbell Posts: 3,146member
    Apple Pay is great. What is not great is retailers support of Apple Pay. Some stores advertise supporting Apple Pay but still there are problems where sometimes it doesn't work. Lucky market is one example. When you going to Tim Hortons the Apple Pay symbol comes up on your phone but the transaction is not completed. So from my perspective the lack of retailers support is the issue. My bank Ally Bank still doesn't support it either.
  • Reply 117 of 140
    tbelltbell Posts: 3,146member
    godrifle wrote: »
    1) Let me restate my point:

    The necessity of carrying cards due to low availability of ApplePay at retailers, coupled with a problematic user experience (for me), leads to me to personally dismiss Apple Pay for having poor utility. Thus, I've not adopted it as a primary payment method, contributing to low usage by me. Perhaps others have this experience and outcome too. This may explain the point of the article.

    2) Flakey in the way that — for example — forced me to break out my Discover card at (of all places) the Chicago Apple Store on Michigan Ave. last week after the Apple employee tried to get a read five or six times. Congrats on your flawless experience. Mine's not been nearly that way. And from the comments of the Apple Store employee in Chicago, on these boards, and elsewhere, it's not been stellar for others either.

    It is odd for me it works flawlessly in some places like whole foods McDonald's or Meijers. In other stores it has issues.
  • Reply 118 of 140
    Actually, you have to hold either your iPhone or your watch close to the terminal for it it to 'light up'. It does not do so by itself.

    With the watch, it just goes through. With the iPhone, you have to place your thumb (or whichever finger you've put in as your identifier) against the home button. Just touch, DO NOT PRESS.

    Arrogance strikes again! Ever tried double clicking the button on your Apple Watch? Regardless of your proximity to an NFC terminal, such an action causes the Apple Watch to enter into a state where it immediately (dare I say effortlessly?) registers with the contactless payment terminal and processes the transition.
  • Reply 119 of 140
    bat catbat cat Posts: 42member
    Whilst the debate on this thread has become very heated I can only add my own personal experience. The proliferation of contextless terminals in the UK means that I have been able to use Apple pay in loads of locations. So far it has worked every time, I agree it's not completely intuitive, but I just went into the apple website, read the guidance and watched the video and in the 20+ transactions since then it has worked exactly as per the apple demo. I'm using both watch and phone. I only have 2 complaints: the transaction time is a bit slow for things like the London Underground and the £30 limit is the primary reason I'm unable to use Apple pay. Given that it's more secure than contact less I'm really hoping Apple pay is allowed a higher value limit in the near future.
  • Reply 120 of 140
    ecatsecats Posts: 272member
    There will be quite a different story in other English speaking markets. The limiting factor in the USA is the lack of wireless terminals, and with that user familiarity with using wireless payment.

    This simply doesn't exist outside of the US-borders where major English speaking markets have been using wireless payment for several years. (England, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, etc.)
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