Swatch CEO calls Apple Watch an 'interesting toy,' voices privacy concerns

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Comments

  • Reply 81 of 94
    brakkenbrakken Posts: 687member

    iCloud account connects all Apple products together.

  • Reply 82 of 94
    analogjackanalogjack Posts: 1,071member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by NolaMacGuy View Post

     
    ...I'm a knowledge worker seated all day, which is linked to higher mortality rates (organ squish). 


     

    Maybe you'd be better off with a kneeling chair than an Apple watch?

  • Reply 83 of 94
    Competitors who criticize The One Smartwatch to Rule Them All, then try to sell their own smartwatch. Nothing is more transparent.
  • Reply 84 of 94
    darendino wrote: »
    I get 4 days out of a single charge on my Sport edition, really impressed.

    How exactly do you do that? Have you it synced with your iPhone? Do you have very few notifications? Don't check the watch often? I think two days is the real limit, you must tell us your secrets!
  • Reply 85 of 94
    clemynxclemynx Posts: 1,510member
    What to say other than : LOL
  • Reply 86 of 94
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,985member
    That guy looks like a real life cartoon character.
  • Reply 87 of 94
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,500member
    German speaking people here really ought to read the original interview, an eye opener:
    http://www.tagesanzeiger.ch/wirtschaft/die-alleskoenner-fressen-zu-viel-strom/story/15079390
  • Reply 88 of 94

  • Reply 89 of 94
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,500member
    [image]

    The similarities are striking!
  • Reply 90 of 94
    lilgto64lilgto64 Posts: 1,147member

    The only watches I have owned since I got out of grade school have been a Casio Data Bank, of which I had several as they weren't the most durable product ever and the tabs which hold the band on would crack. I used it for years to keep my schedule while working in retail. And for a while I had a watch that synced with the atomic clock in DC - which actually came in very handy one night when the store manager questioned why I was closing the store when I was despite his complete lack of providing any assistance in running any of the day end procedures - I told him in was 9pm and he said his watch said 8:55 so why should we use yours. 

    After I got a desk job and especially since I got a smart phone - I have had no need whatsoever for a clock on my wrist. With computers, TVs, Cable boxes, Thermostats, microwave ovens, etc all having clocks on them I have no need for a watch. 

    I need even for a moment considered a Swatch as I have never felt a need to buy a product to make a fashion statement - the overwhelming majority of my clothing doesn't even have any visible tag or markings to indicate the brand and I deliberately choose not to buy clothing that has the name of the maker or sellers emblazoned across it. 

  • Reply 91 of 94
    pmzpmz Posts: 3,433member

    I'm simply don't buy the battery argument. I've worn my Apple Watch every day for months now and never once has my charger left my nightstand. Never once has my watch died on me while in use.

     

    I'm not sleeping with the damn thing on, and when you take it off it makes for a great alarm clock/nightstand. Why wouldn't you put it on the charger at night is the better question.

     

    Complaining about Apple Watch battery and claiming it needs to last multiple days instead of 1 full day is a non-argument. There is no real world merit or value to it.

  • Reply 92 of 94
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,453member
    analogjack wrote: »
    Maybe you'd be better off with a kneeling chair than an Apple watch?
    I'm also a big fan of "active sitting" and the Swopper Chair.

    700

    Frankly, I don't get the logic behind buying an ?Watch primarily to remind you to stand. I've been using an app on my work computer which reminds me to look away from the screen every 20 min. There are similar apps for standing. I have a standing desk so this is not really an issue for me. If anything I need to remember to sit. It seems to me if someone is concerned about sitting too long at work, their computer would be the best place to remind them to stand, since it's presumably the thing keeping them at their desk and it's right in front of them. The watch doesn't really do this any better since it surprisingly doesn't know whether the wearer is seated or standing. And frankly, this is the kind of thing easily accomplished with an egg timer, not a $400 watch, assuming it was ever a concern for anybody before Apple brought it to market.

    But there are all sorts of use cases for the watch, and if someone finds this use case beneficial, who am I to say it's not worth the purchase price for them? For me, notifications are a non-starter, as I already have my favorites well organized, and the ability to prioritize an important e-mail thread if I need to make it a priority. So when I hear a custom notification sound, it means I need to look at it, since I will most likely need to respond with more than a one word reply. Fitness tracking is of little interest, as I live a very active lifestyle and a well scheduled workout routine. I am interested in the ability to get my heart rate when doing cardio though, and sleep tracking. But mostly what I use it for is a watch to tell time, when I've intentionally left my iPhone behind. I'm interested in the ability to unlock things without my iPhone. Likewise for the ability to use ?Pay. And the icing on the cake is the ability to get notifications by logging onto wifi, without the need for my iPhone, something Watch OS2 promises to bring to the table independent of the iPhone. And even if there's no GPS, the ability to stop into a local Starbucks if you're lost, to update your location in Maps would be cool (of course in most cases you'll have your phone).

    I'm not so interested in the watch as an accessory to my iPhone, since I already have its use well regulated. But I am interested in it as an iPhone replacement in specific instances, especially in water-related activities where it would be inappropriate to take the iPhone. For instance: a day at the beach, or in the pool in the backyard with friends and family. To be clear, as I outlined above, I don't think the watch should duplicate all the features of the phone, but rather do enough that I can leave the phone at home. I'm not advocating for the watch to contain a cellular radio, even though I think this is eventually the goal. I was actually impressed with the battery life, and water-resistance, after being subjected to real world use, which is why I ultimately bought one. It's perfect for surfing, and to spend the day at the beach without being completely out of touch, not to mention all the other things it can do, which is just the tip of the iceberg -- I can't wait for Watch OS 2.

    However, I feel like it was conceived by the corporate mentality which worked so well to develop the iPhone as an indispensable business tool, and grew to new heights in the public hands with selfies, and movies, and games. I feel like the watch was born the same way -- a bunch of middle-aged, desk-bound bureaucrats, who need to be reminded to take better care of themselves, and are drowning in a sea of notifications which was wearing out their pockets and interrupting their day checking all of them on the phone. And this may be the most practical market for the watch, but there's so many more uses as it exists, that are equally as valuable justification to expand its use; which I suspect we'll see with full autonomous apps, and once it's in the hands of more people. I know I have.

    edited for typos and bizarre iPad autocorrections
  • Reply 93 of 94
    mac_128 wrote: »
    Frankly, I don't get the logic behind buying an ?Watch primarily to remind you to stand. I've been using an app on my work computer which reminds me to look away from the screen every 20 min. There are similar apps for standing. I have a standing desk so this is not really an issue for me.

    Ah yes, proof by "this is not really an issue for me." (Slow clap). Hats off to you, sir. You've single handedly shown the folly of Apple Watch. You win. /s

    This flawgic is like saying, "Frankly, I don't get the logic behind buying a phone with GPS primary for navigation. I've been using the GPS built in to my car so it's not really an issue for me."

    Here's the flaw:

    People aren't always inactively sitting at their PCs. (And how would you PC know you're sitting or standing?) People sit in all kinds of situations. They could be watching TV. Playing Xbox (or as the smart people call them, Playstation). Maybe just sitting around playing on their phone or tablet (iPhone and iPads), or sitting in conversation with another person in a social setting like a bar. Your PC would do as much good in these situations as having GPS in your car when you're on foot, or riding in a taxi.
  • Reply 94 of 94
    solipsismysolipsismy Posts: 5,099member
    mac_128 wrote: »
    But I am interested in it as an iPhone replacement in specific instances, especially in water-related activities where it would be in appropriate to take the iPhone..

    You're going to complain that it's too large, the battery doesn't last long enough, and that it's not easily to use, and then you want it to be a replacement for your iPhone? So you want to pay for a larger device with worse battery life that costs a lot more, not to mention the extra carrier plan, so you can use it occasionally in some invented "water-reflated activity" where you wouldn't have your iPhone in BT or WiFi range but need desperately to make and/or take an important phone call? :sigh: If you're going to hate Apple, fine, but don't make up stupid fucking scenarios to justify your reasoning.

    BTW, how many other wrist-worn cellphones have you bought in the past if this feature is such a necessarily to you? I'm gonna guess none.
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