iOS 9 Safari content blockers debut to demand, denouncement & a high-profile delisting

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Comments

  • Reply 241 of 421
    Anyone who has stolen music has no right to criticise ad blockers. And I think it's safe to say the vast majority of the publishers whining about this have done, and currently do just that. Hypocrites.

    Of course my evidence is non existent, but statistically this must be true.

    I'm a composer and I rely on people paying for music to survive.

    It angers me that publishers are up in arms about ad blocking, yet think it fine to steal other online content.

    Not to mention those sites that just republish other writers' work almost word for word.

    And those that steal photos, and artwork without any compensation to the photographers and artists.
  • Reply 242 of 421
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismY View Post





    That's like saying I'm morally obligated not to get up to use the bathroom during a commercial break of a network TV show.



    You don't need to read any further. You won't read any better comment than the one above. Well done SolipsismY :smokey:

  • Reply 243 of 421
    Put simply - advertising has become the scourge of modern society.

    It is just too much, pushing out content to tell us about things we don't want to know about. It is time the marketing idiots realised enough is enough and that their silly campaigns are having the reverse effect and setting people against their products.
  • Reply 244 of 421
    matrix07matrix07 Posts: 1,993member
    dasanman69 wrote: »
    Aren't iOS users flush with cash? It's just a few dollars. Quit your crying already

    It's not about money. It's about responsibility. You release an app, you take care of it at least for a certain period of time. If you can't do that, don't write a code. Make up your mind before you submit your app, or better yet before you even write the first code.
    There are people who bought his app and today have no way to know that it won't be supported. That if they install the OS as new they'll lose the app forever.
  • Reply 245 of 421
    sog35 wrote: »
    There is no guarantee it will keep on working. Any little undiscovered bug could crash the entire App, and since there will be no updates it will forever be damanged.

    And what about when iOS10 comes out? Can Marco give 100% guarantee that it will be compatable. No he can't. He screwed people. PERIOD.

    I'm sure if Marco told Apple to refund EVERY purchase he could. Apple has done this before for other Apps.

    You seem to want to have a determined and senseless rant despite the facts.

    You buy an app to run on your current version of iOS; you don't and cannot know if that developer will continue to support that app in future versions of iOS. You may want them to but you don't know if they will. They may stop supporting any of their apps, may cease to be a developer and become a hermit and withdraw from the external world altogether. Your purchase of an app provides you no guarantees.

    You may have noticed that after Apple took money for Aperture and subsequent updates, they no longer plan to develop it or support it on future releases of OS X. What would you do about that if you'd bought it - stop buying any future software from Apple?

    You need to grow up and find out how software sales and support actually work, not the way you think they should in your parallel universe or you're in for a lot of disappointment.
  • Reply 246 of 421
    I don't know of this is been said before, but to me it's quite simple. I have observed a significant decrease in overall quality of Internet "reporting" due to the vast increase of ad-sponsored sites that basically copy content from elsewhere. Ads make this erosion possible. Get rid of ads and quality will prevail - as a ppv or subscription model or maybe something entirely new, is my conviction.
    Oh, and Google contributor is just like the guy in the black suit entering my shop saying "hello my friend. Your place has a lot of inflammable things in it. Let me make you a proposal: you will pay me and I protect you against those evil ads, err, flames."
  • Reply 247 of 421
    sog35 wrote: »
    And can Marco guarantee a bug won't afect the front end?
    Can he guarantee it will play nice with iOS 10?
    NO he can't.

    Can you guarantee that every app that you are now running on your IOS device will continue running on iOS 10?

    No?

    Just stop it now, OK.
  • Reply 248 of 421
    I'm reading Appleinsider exclusively with your app and I'd pay a monthly subscription of the price you ask for annually if that got rid of annoying ads. I don't mind some ads that are actually useful or some sponsored articles, but I have installed Peace to block ads like Amazon's ad for The Walking Dead, because I don't want to see mangled corpses for breakfast.

    I think online publications should offer a reduced ad and an ad-free experience, depending on how much someone pays, these days this can actually be done dynamically leaving it up to the user how much they pay.
  • Reply 249 of 421
    You seem to want to have a determined and senseless rant despite the facts.

    You buy an app to run on your current version of iOS; you don't and cannot know if that developer will continue to support that app in future versions of iOS. You may want them to but you don't know if they will. They may stop supporting any of their apps, may cease to be a developer and become a hermit and withdraw from the external world altogether. Your purchase of an app provides you no guarantees.

    You may have noticed that after Apple took money for Aperture and subsequent updates, they no longer plan to develop it or support it on future releases of OS X. What would you do about that if you'd bought it - stop buying any future software from Apple?

    You need to grow up and find out how software sales and support actually work, not the way you think they should in your parallel universe or you're in for a lot of disappointment.

    Good post... and saved me the time to say the same thing.

    I would like to add, the entitlement of certain OPs on these forums as well as the debate raging across multiple sites... *almost* makes me embarrassed for my earlier post laying into AI as hard as I did. This must stop across industries, whether entertainment, information, or retail! We all still live in free-market economies and you are entitled to as much as a service or manufacturer offers.

    IF you don't like it... you are FREE to choose something else that fits your needs. WE/YOU/I are NOT entitled to receive anything, and I would even add... respect... to that list. At some point in time you have to EARN something by a simple modicum of civilized behavior and acknowledgement of other people's endeavors and hard work.

    *Almost* - because as sarcastic and aggressive as I allowed myself to write the post due to heated emotion about having the finger pointed at US as the problem, I should've stepped back, been a bit more civilized myself and addressed the issues rather than taking it personal. Regardless... I still believe my post had nuggets of truth and hope that AI cuts through my BS and Limburger*cheese to find a way to make this site better for all of us... and for themselves.

    * Very stinky stuff almost as bad as "foul smelling fish heads".
  • Reply 250 of 421
    I could not help noticing the following remark:

    "Anyone can agree that some mobile ads are exceptionally egregious and must be kept in check. But anyone who believes they are entitled to simply block ads across the board and deprive publications and their staff of advertising revenue and their very livelihood is flat-out wrong."

    I think it is a very interesting statement, and a very problematic one too.

    It seems in this discussion that somehow a new narrative is developing, where it is seen as an obligation of consumers that they must accept being fed with ads, because it is a necessity of the industry, as this is how they create their income, and without it, they would not be able to survive.

    Of course this makes sense seen in the present situation of ad-paid services, seen from the perspective of the media/industry. But, and this I think is a very important but: This is only one side of the story.

    The whole idea of ad-paid (apparently free) media and other services is a culture which has been developed partly by the industry itself. It is by no means a natural law. And it is, in my opinion, extremely interesting to see now that the narrative is turning from the original idea of offering services, to consumers, financed by ads, to a situation where the consumers are seen as being obliged to receive these ads. Of course we are not obliged. And just ike the market is constantly seeking new ways to develop new ways to make consumers buy more. Consumers and developers are seeking new ways to defend their own territory. What is strange in that? This is, after all the premise of our market oriented systems.

    I think instead this is more a problem of the industries/media knowingly having been developing a consumer culture through their own competition, which is letting people believe that services are free. The media channels and others who are now financed by ads would be free of course to turn their business into subscription based services that reflects the actual costs. But it is in no way fair to oblige people to accept ads. That people seek ad blockers is just another manifestation of our market-system, where consumers are free to choose, isn't it?
  • Reply 251 of 421
    I could not help noticing the following remark:

    "Anyone can agree that some mobile ads are exceptionally egregious and must be kept in check. But anyone who believes they are entitled to simply block ads across the board and deprive publications and their staff of advertising revenue and their very livelihood is flat-out wrong."

    I think it is a very interesting statement, and a very problematic one too.

    It seems in this discussion that somehow a new narrative is developing, where it is seen as an obligation of consumers that they must accept being fed with ads, because it is a necessity of the industry, as this is how they create their income, and without it, they would not be able to survive.

    Of course this makes sense seen in the present situation of ad-paid services, seen from the perspective of the media/industry. But, and this I think is a very important but: This is only one side of the story.

    The whole idea of ad-paid (apparently free) media and other services is a culture which has been developed partly by the industry itself. It is by no means a natural law. And it is, in my opinion, extremely interesting to see now that the narrative is turning from the original idea of offering services, to consumers, financed by ads, to a situation where the consumers are seen as being obliged to receive these ads. Of course we are not obliged. And just ike the market is constantly seeking new ways to develop new ways to make consumers buy more. Consumers and developers are seeking new ways to defend their own territory. What is strange in that? This is, after all the premise of our market oriented systems.

    I think instead this is more a problem of the industries/media knowingly having been developing a consumer culture through their own competition, which is letting people believe that services are free. The media channels and others who are now financed by ads would be free of course to turn their business into subscription based services that reflects the actual costs. But it is in no way fair to oblige people to accept ads. That people seek ad blockers is just another manifestation of our market-system, where consumers are free to choose, isn't it?
  • Reply 252 of 421
    pmzpmz Posts: 3,433member
    I give zero fucks that you got into the ad supported model and have no other way of sustaining a job. That's fucking pathetic.

    I will block absolutely every ad forever, because it's my fucking web experience. I don't have to support the broken model.
  • Reply 253 of 421
    matrix07 wrote: »
    dasanman69 wrote: »
    Aren't iOS users flush with cash? It's just a few dollars. Quit your crying already

    It's not about money. It's about responsibility. You release an app, you take care of it at least for a certain period of time. If you can't do that, don't write a code. Make up your mind before you submit your app, or better yet before you even write the first code.
    There are people who bought his app and today have no way to know that it won't be supported. That if they install the OS as new they'll lose the app forever.

    You've never done something that you immediately regretted? Is this the first paid app abandoned by its dev? What's the worse that can happen if the app stops working?
  • Reply 254 of 421
    dasanman69 wrote: »
    You've never done something that you immediately regretted? Is this the first paid app abandoned by its dev? What's the worse that can happen if the app stops working?

    He had time to think about it, and collected money from a number of strangers. It's not the same as a thoughtless decision whose effect is quite localized.

    Is he refunding the money?
  • Reply 255 of 421
    thrang wrote: »
    dasanman69 wrote: »
    You've never done something that you immediately regretted? Is this the first paid app abandoned by its dev? What's the worse that can happen if the app stops working?

    He had time to think about it, and collected money from a number of strangers. It's not the same as a thoughtless decision whose effect is quite localized.

    Is he refunding the money?

    He's refunding the money to anyone who requests one.
  • Reply 256 of 421
    Downloaded, enabled Crystal & Purify, no difference in add quantity I can tell yet.
  • Reply 257 of 421
    I am trying out BlockBear and it has a whitelist feature. I have added AppleInsider.com so I DO get the ads. I plan to add other sites which have useful ads.

    rogerpyle
  • Reply 258 of 421
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post





    You've never done something that you immediately regretted? Is this the first paid app abandoned by its dev? What's the worse that can happen if the app stops working?



    Strangely no. When it comes to my profession, what I charge people for, I always think things through. Never abruptly U-turn like this. Believe it or not!

     

    Also you might be new to him but this is not the first time he'd done something like this. He used to make an app called The Magazine that call for people to subscribe monthly. A few months later he sold it to someone else. How can you trust people like this?

  • Reply 259 of 421
    Quote:



    Originally Posted by matrix07 View Post



    There are people who bought his app and today have no way to know that it won't be supported. That if they install the OS as new they'll lose the app forever.

    Generally things break only with major OS updates and we are quite a long way away from that. Secondly, lot's of apps stop getting updates after some time and only very rarely will the user be aware of it.

  • Reply 260 of 421
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by noirdesir View Post

     

    Generally things break only with major OS updates and we are quite a long way away from that. Secondly, lot's of apps stop getting updates after some time and only very rarely will the user be aware of it.




    Please read my last sentence you quoted. There's already one guy who have to re-install iOS 9 as new and lost the app. It's "a few days" we're talking about here. Not years. Not months. Not even weeks.

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