Apple's iPhone and iPad regain enterprise marketshare in Q3

Posted:
in iPhone edited November 2015
Apple's annual iPhone refresh cycle, and a resurgence in iPad, helped iOS regain marketshare in the enterprise over the quarter ending in September, according to fresh statistics from Good Powered by BlackBerry.



As presented in Good's (formerly Good Technology) Mobility Index released on Tuesday, Apple's iOS accounted for 66 percent of enterprise device activations for the third quarter of 2015, up 2 percent sequentially. Apple normally sees an uptick in marketshare on the heels of new iPhone model launches, in this case the iPhone 6s.

While Apple over the past three months eroded Android marketshare from 32 percent to 31 percent, and Windows from 3 percent to 2 percent, the competing mobile operating systems are gradually closing the gap. iOS held 77 percent of the market at the end of 2012, a number that fell to 73 percent in 2013 and 2014. The dip can in part be attributed to flagging iPad performance.

For the third quarter, Good found 71 percent of enterprise tablet activations went to iPad, up from 64 percent at the end of June. By comparison, Android tablet share dropped from 25 percent to 21 percent, while windows moved from 11 percent to 8 percent.

The iPad previously dominated the category with a 90 percent share, but cheaper offerings from Android device makers spurred strong adoption rates in 2014 and early 2015. Apple's tablet marketshare was pegged at 81 percent as recently as March.

Breaking down adoption by sector, iOS commanded 83 percent of public sector activations, 77 percent for financial services, 68 percent for insurance and 77 percent of education. Google's Android leads in high tech and transportation, where it is running on a respective 52 percent and 50 percent of all devices.

Secure app development is experiencing massive growth on all platforms, as activations on the Good Dynamics Secure Mobility Platform were up 30 percent for the quarter, or 188 percent year over year. For all industries save fore retail, secure browsers proved the most popular app category, while custom apps, secure IM, document editing and document access rounding out the top five.

Good Technology, now a subsidiary of of BlackBerry, aggregated activation data from its global customer base of more than 6,200 organizations spread across 189 countries.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 12
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,953member

    Whether it’s good news or bad news for Apple keep in mind that these analytics and statistics are produced by companies with clients that pay for the information. The information is used in various ways such as marketing, business models, future direction initiatives, etc. In the case of Apple it’s been pretty clear for years that these studies are used to manipulate AAPL stock and so are suspect from the get-go. 

  • Reply 2 of 12
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,165member
    Seeing Microsoft go from 3% to 2% is so sweet having been in the trenches back when Apple was in enterprise and IBM and Microsoft forced it out. I realize this is only mobile but these days what else makes money? Nice pay back that IBM switched horses too. Got to love that. It can't be long before Macs start pushing out PCs in enterprise too.
  • Reply 3 of 12
    haggarhaggar Posts: 1,568member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post



    Seeing Microsoft go from 3% to 2% is so sweet having been in the trenches back when Apple was in enterprise and IBM and Microsoft forced it out. I realize this is only mobile but these days what else makes money? Nice pay back that IBM switched horses too. Got to love that. It can't be long before Macs start pushing out PCs in enterprise too.



    Don't assume that if your work gives you a Mac, you will be able to use it just like your personal home computer.  There are still plenty of ways for IT departments to screw Mac users. For example:

     

    Only allowing people to purchase the lowest end Mac with lowest price, slowest CPU, least memory, and slowest storage.  For laptops, they may only allow the lowest end 11 inch MacBook Air.  For desktops, they may only allow the lowest end Mac Mini or possibly the lowest end 21 inch iMac.  Meanwhile, PC users will get faster hardware, more memory, and SSDs instead of hard drives.  The company will justify the crippled Macs based on price alone (Apple is partly to blame for this, with their crippled low end models).  You may try to argue reliability and support costs vs. PCs in an attempt to get a better Mac, but it won't matter since purchasing and support come from different budgets and they will not transfer money back and forth.

     

    If you work in any decently sized company, end users will typically be set up with no admin access on their computers.  The computers can be so heavily restricted that users won't be able to do even basic tasks like change a desktop picture or screensaver.  Macs will also be exempt from OS X upgrades because IT will not want to spend time learning a new version of OS X.  And if you try to bring in a portable hard drive with your own boot system, IT can lock down your Mac with a firmware password to prevent external booting. Or they can just have you fired for violating some company IT policy.

     

    I have been in companies where the Macs were set up so improperly, IT made so many unneeded system modifications, it caused so many issues that the users were begging to get PCs.  Whether this was done through incompetence or intentional sabotage remains to be seen.

     

    And the best one of all: "You can have a Mac as long as it runs Windows only.  Best of both worlds."

  • Reply 4 of 12
    Certainly less risk of viruses still...
  • Reply 5 of 12
    mac voyermac voyer Posts: 1,283member
    Now that Blackberry owns Good, why aren't their enterprise numbers showing up?
  • Reply 6 of 12
    appexappex Posts: 687member
    Worldwide market share? That is the key figure.
  • Reply 7 of 12
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,165member
    haggar wrote: »

    Don't assume that if your work gives you a Mac, you will be able to use it just like your personal home computer.  There are still plenty of ways for IT departments to screw Mac users. For example:

    Only allowing people to purchase the lowest end Mac with lowest price, slowest CPU, least memory, and slowest storage.  For laptops, they may only allow the lowest end 11 inch MacBook Air.  For desktops, they may only allow the lowest end Mac Mini or possibly the lowest end 21 inch iMac.  Meanwhile, PC users will get faster hardware, more memory, and SSDs instead of hard drives.  The company will justify the crippled Macs based on price alone (Apple is partly to blame for this, with their crippled low end models).  You may try to argue reliability and support costs vs. PCs in an attempt to get a better Mac, but it won't matter since purchasing and support come from different budgets and they will not transfer money back and forth.

    If you work in any decently sized company, end users will typically be set up with no admin access on their computers.  The computers can be so heavily restricted that users won't be able to do even basic tasks like change a desktop picture or screensaver.  Macs will also be exempt from OS X upgrades because IT will not want to spend time learning a new version of OS X.  And if you try to bring in a portable hard drive with your own boot system, IT can lock down your Mac with a firmware password to prevent external booting. Or they can just have you fired for violating some company IT policy.

    I have been in companies where the Macs were set up so improperly, IT made so many unneeded system modifications, it caused so many issues that the users were begging to get PCs.  Whether this was done through incompetence or intentional sabotage remains to be seen.

    And the best one of all: "You can have a Mac as long as it runs Windows only.  Best of both worlds."

    You make t sound like a living Hell, I am glad I was the President of a company and was able to mandate Apple equipment for everyone. PCs were only for testing like lab rats just so we knew what was going on and how to convert any files.
  • Reply 8 of 12
    haggar wrote: »

    Don't assume that if your work gives you a Mac, you will be able to use it just like your personal home computer.  There are still plenty of ways for IT departments to screw Mac users. For example:

    Only allowing people to purchase the lowest end Mac with lowest price, slowest CPU, least memory, and slowest storage.  For laptops, they may only allow the lowest end 11 inch MacBook Air.  For desktops, they may only allow the lowest end Mac Mini or possibly the lowest end 21 inch iMac.  Meanwhile, PC users will get faster hardware, more memory, and SSDs instead of hard drives.  The company will justify the crippled Macs based on price alone (Apple is partly to blame for this, with their crippled low end models).  You may try to argue reliability and support costs vs. PCs in an attempt to get a better Mac, but it won't matter since purchasing and support come from different budgets and they will not transfer money back and forth.

    If you work in any decently sized company, end users will typically be set up with no admin access on their computers.  The computers can be so heavily restricted that users won't be able to do even basic tasks like change a desktop picture or screensaver.  Macs will also be exempt from OS X upgrades because IT will not want to spend time learning a new version of OS X.  And if you try to bring in a portable hard drive with your own boot system, IT can lock down your Mac with a firmware password to prevent external booting. Or they can just have you fired for violating some company IT policy.

    I have been in companies where the Macs were set up so improperly, IT made so many unneeded system modifications, it caused so many issues that the users were begging to get PCs.  Whether this was done through incompetence or intentional sabotage remains to be seen.

    And the best one of all: "You can have a Mac as long as it runs Windows only.  Best of both worlds."

    Wow, do you work at my company? You just described our Mac situation perfectly. I run the design studio at a major corporation so we are an island of about 130 Macs in a sea of thousands of PCs. They have locked down our Macs so tight that we can't even change the energy saver settings to prevent our systems from shutting down at night even though that is when we have Chronosync scheduled to do large file transfers. We have constant mysterious crashes that I am certain is related to the anti-virus software that is needlessly installed. (Even IT admits it is not needed Macs, but our digital liability insurance requires it to be installed.)

    After three decades of using Macs, with dozens of custom Applescripts to help our workflow, I actually started thinking about switching to PCs just so we could get better support from IT. But then I realized that the support would probably be just as bad and that we would just be exchanging one set of problems for another. The bigger problem than Macs not fitting in enterprise environments is that most IT departments just do not understand the needs of a major design department. Probably 99% of the people they support only use their computers for email and Excel. So basically if IT can get the browser running with MS Office they are done. So when we start taking about storage needs that approach a petabyte and the finicky nature of Adobe applications working on SMB shares, they are at a loss.

    However, I will say that Apple is not blameless here. Apple provides little to no support for Macs in an enterprise environment. Having worked closely with IT I can tell you that just getting Apple on the phone is next to impossible, and generally worthless when you do. Whereas the kind of support you get from Microsoft is, well, enterprise class. Plus Apple's new annual update OS cycle makes it almost impossible to keep our systems working properly with all the myriad of enterprise-class systems like Kronos, Aprimo, ADAM, etc. and because Apple makes it where its newest computers can't run anything but the latest OS that it shipped with, we are forced to upgrade as we cycle new computers into service.
  • Reply 9 of 12
    mike1mike1 Posts: 1,870member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Mac Voyer View Post



    Now that Blackberry owns Good, why aren't their enterprise numbers showing up?

    There aren't any.

  • Reply 10 of 12
    steven n.steven n. Posts: 1,112member
    You make t sound like a living Hell, I am glad I was the President of a company and was able to mandate Apple equipment for everyone. PCs were only for testing like lab rats just so we knew what was going on and how to convert any files.

    That is the living hell of corporate IT. It really is a dark and miserable existence.
  • Reply 11 of 12
    That's even more impressive since it's a worldwide stat! Nice to see Apple regaining their marketshare after some companies "tested" alternative Android choices. I wouldn't be surprised to see it go up again next quarter.
  • Reply 12 of 12
    Most corporate IT departments do the bidding of corporate management, who rarely consult the users of the productivity software and systems that they mandate them to use, and extremely rarely have to or even know how to use same software.

    And why management does this is usually for the simple reason that they can...
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