New York state considers bill mandating backdoors in smartphone encryption

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 45
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 2,310member
    Actual criminals use burner phones, anyway. You know, dumbphones with prepaid SIM cards that they just chuck into the river when they’re done with a given crime?

    Even if they won’t admit it to themselves (or they’re paid not to), everyone knows that government control over communication has nothing to do with criminal activity. Only citizens’.
    pmcd said:
    There does seem to be a fairly strong movement in the US to track people's private communications. Sad but realistically Apple has to have a way of dealing with this…
    Of course they do. It’s unconstitutional.
    We know US citizens do not have a right of anonymous speech. I wonder if the constitution secures a right of private speech. 

    The 4th and 14th amendment protections on search and seizure have many exceptions. 

    The word "privacy" has many meanings and implications. 
  • Reply 42 of 45
    pmcdpmcd Posts: 394member

    pmcd said:
    There does seem to be a fairly strong movement in the US to track people's private communications. Sad but realistically Apple has to have a way of dealing with this…
    Of course they do. It’s unconstitutional.
    I don't know one way or another. The problem is that Apple relies on the iPhone for a majority of its revenue. While Apple defends its rights in court what do you think will happen to sales? This is a nightmare scenario for them. Even if Apple were to prevail after years of fighting this would the company even be around to savor a victory? 
  • Reply 43 of 45
    STOP AUTOCORRECTING ALREADY, SAFARI:
    While Apple defends its rights in court what do you think will happen to sales?
    Skyrocket, since people like their rights and don’t trust or respect the government anymore. A company with this much swing standing up for personal privacy would see more sales than they could handle.
    …would the company even be around to savor a victory? 
    Apple could stop selling all products today and still pay their employees full salaries (and cover operating/existing costs) for an entire decade.
    edited January 2016
  • Reply 44 of 45
    Wow, any legislator who voted for this could say goodbye to reelection.  Not only would it be extremely unpopular with many voters knowing government can pry into their privacy but it would also be damaging to NYC economy.  If you ban stores in NYC from selling devices that don't provide a backdoor guess what, PEOPLE WILL BUY IT ELSEWHERE!  Sorry all you local tech companies, your state government just banned the sale of technology that doesn't give law enforcement a backdoor, looks like you'll be loosing all your sales to businesses online or across state lines.
    tallest skil
  • Reply 45 of 45
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,451member
    Assemblyman Matthew Titone is a Democrat, folks. Parties don't matter. Everyone in power wants to violate your rights to amass more power for themselves.
    Hillary Clinton also appears to be on board with forcing techs to comply with government requests for access to user data based on last night's debate. In addition she intimates that despite what we've publicly heard techs agreed to work with government agencies. 

    CLINTON: Well, I wanted to say, and I’ll do it quickly, I was very pleased that leaders of President Obama’s administration went out to Silicon Valley last week and began exactly this conversation about what we can do, consistent with privacy and security.

    We need better intelligence cooperation, we need to be sure that we are getting the best intelligence that we can from friends and allies around the world. And then, we’ve got to recognize our first line of defense against lone wolf attacks is among Muslim Americans.

    And it is not only shameful, it is dangerous for the kinds of comments you’re hearing from the Republican side.

    We need to be reaching out and unifying our country against terrorist attacks and lone wolves, and working with Muslim Americans.

    HOLT: And Andrea Mitchell has a follow-up.

    MITCHELL: But — but — Secretary Clinton, you said that the leaders from the intelligence community went to Silicon Valley, they were flatly turned down. They got nowhere.

    CLINTON: That is not what I’ve heard. Let me leave it at that.


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