Munster: Apple Pay distribution low, but peer-to-peer and in-browser payments to goose adoption in

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  • Reply 20 of 27
    cnocbui said:
    johnhwood said:
    Too bad the Big 4 Aussie banks are run like a cartel. Apple just need to crack one of them and they'll all fall like domino's.
    Wondering why apple wouldn't have started with a P2P strategy to begin with? Get users comfortable like using paypal, then roll it out to physical stores.
    My recent trip to Oz was an example of how everything is wrong. I successfully used my American iPhone and ApplePay accounts at EVERY RETAILER that accepts PayWave. Of all the purchases I made, only one was made with physical card swipe. Australia needs the banks on board, and America needs the retailers on board.
    If Apple wants it adopted in countries like Australia, they could just offer it for free, then it might stand a chance of being accepted.
    Well, it practically is around the world already.  0.15%?  That's pennies (or whatever it is in Australia)
  • Reply 22 of 27
    I will be staying away from Apple Pay and other mobile wallets in the near future.

    I recently had my 9 months old iPhone 6's battery die on me (went from 40% to dead in an instant), and suddenly I was out of almost all means of communication (I've enabled 2FA everywhere...might need to start rethinking my strategy). Not having a credit/debit card as well would have been disastrous.

    And frankly, pulling out a plastic card from my wallet and swiping that is far less annoying than fidgeting with my phone, although it is admittedly less secure. And the new chip+pin system is definitely more annoying than the swipes used to be.
  • Reply 23 of 27
    tapetape Posts: 40member
    rob53 said:
    lkrupp said:
    And the retailers who do support it have poorly trained sales clerks and often improperly configured NFC terminals that sporadically deny the transactions. I purchased a $10 item last week from my local Microcenter using Apple Pay. The terminal required my debit card’s PIN number to complete the transaction and then the clerk asked me for my name on top of it. Why not just use cash?
    How true. I'd also like to see a guide on how ApplePay handles different levels of transactions. When do I need to sign? Do I ever need to sign when I'm using my finger/thumb print to validate my credit card? As everyone knows, people's signatures nowadays stink. Nobody can read 80% of them (I made up this percentage) with many of them being a couple wavy lines. That's not a signature so why worry about it. I would like this information so I can give it to the retailers to help them since, as you say, very few of them have any idea what ApplePay is. I'd also like an update on the chipped card requirements since I continue to see large retailers who still haven't installed them. 
    A supermarket chain in my area recently started taking Apple Pay, and I used it a couple of times when I was running in for a few items. Last weekend I went in for a bigger shopping trip and tried to use Apple Pay, and apparently they don't accept it for transactions larger than $50. huh?
  • Reply 24 of 27
    rob53rob53 Posts: 3,010member
    rob53 said:

    Speaking of Square, I received my contactless + chipped card reader. I also requested free decals from both Apple and Square. I hate decals on computers (makes them look like a Windows PC or a race car) but I wanted an easy way for people to see I take ApplePay. I talked to a cashier and suggested they get the ApplePay decals so people know it's accepted when they get to the counter instead of finding out when the ApplePay logo finally shows up on the screen. Unfortunately, I think the users are going to have to force the adoption of ApplePay. 



    I mine as well. It's a pretty nifty device. Why didn't you put the Android Pay logo decal on there as well? I would want as many people as I can to pay any way they want. 
    The people I know who use Android phones are much less likely to buy from me and much less likely to even know they could use their phone to make purchases. I refuse to use a magnetic strip reader so Samsung's fake system isn't coming anywhere near my Square reader. As a retailer, I can decide how payments to me are made just like all the retailers who aren't accepting ApplePay. Does this make me a snob? Maybe, but this is how I'm doing business, which is a small one. The actual reason I even bought this device was to help educate local Square POS system merchants on its use so they could easily expand to accepting ApplePay. As I've said before, we (maybe not you) the ApplePay users need to educate merchants on its benefits because Apple doesn't have the resources to go out and educate them. Are you an iPhone user? Are you educating merchants who don't know anything about ApplePay how to use it, including it's benefits and security? 
  • Reply 25 of 27
    I'm finding Apple Pay is an option at more stores, but it seems to be inconsistent to use, and not nearly as simple as I expected.

    The shop I use it at most often actually needs you to sign the screen of the terminal to complete the transaction.  This is despite the fact there is no way for the cashier to validate my signature, what with it not being on the phone like it is on the card.

    Whole Foods sometimes needs you to sign, sometimes it doesn't.

    I thought one of the big selling points was that the security was so much better because it was just validated with your thumbprint.

    With all that said, it will be good it they allow phone to phone transactions.  It seemed silly a month ago when I owed some money to a friend who works at Apple, as we sat drinking at a bar next to Infinite Loop, that I had to use PayPal to send him money!
    palomine
  • Reply 26 of 27
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    cnocbui said:
    If Apple wants it adopted in countries like Australia, they could just offer it for free, then it might stand a chance of being accepted.
    Well, it practically is around the world already.  0.15%?  That's pennies (or whatever it is in Australia)
    Apple don't need pennies, so I stand by my original comment. Oh - and Australia would have cents - if they had any - except they ditched one and two cent coins a long time ago.
    edited January 2016
  • Reply 27 of 27
    cintos said:
    lkrupp said:
    And the retailers who do support it have poorly trained sales clerks and often improperly configured NFC terminals that sporadically deny the transactions. I purchased a $10 item last week from my local Microcenter using Apple Pay. The terminal required my debit card’s PIN number to complete the transaction and then the clerk asked me for my name on top of it. Why not just use cash?
    Similar situation today. I used Apple Pay at a grocery store which prominently displayed the Apple Pay logo. Placing my phone near the terminal brought up the app and I used my fingerprint to authorize. THEN, the clerk asked to see the physical card AND see my ID. That would drive me back to my cash card & pin. It is true though that as more retailer get chipped terminals that require the card be inserted into the unit, the ensuing D E L A Y in processing will help motivate folks to use Apple Pay (providing the retailer drops the stupid physical card / ID)

    This would irritate to me to no end! How frustrating.

    I've also found that a few times when I go to pay with my phone, for example- McDonald's the girl was in awe. This has happened on more than one occasion. I think there needs to be education on the consumer side, as well as merchants, perhaps a simple memo would be suffice? McDonald's is maybe a little different because of franchising etc. but there was an ApplePay logo on the door right up there with Visa, MC, Amex etc.  At another McDonald's at the drive thru I used ApplePay. Again, the logo was on the drive up window, so she got the terminal and held it up and I did my thing and that was that.

    Basically it comes down to education. 
    edited February 2016
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