Apple Music passes 11M subscribers as iCloud hits 782M users

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in iPod + iTunes + AppleTV
During a wide-ranging interview published on Friday, Apple executives Eddy Cue and Craig Federighi revealed fresh statistics on the company's various internet services like Apple Music, which now boasts more than 11 million paying subscribers.




The new Apple Music headcount surfaced alongside other interesting tidbits in an hour-long sit-down session with John Gruber, published as an episode of the blogger's The Talk Show podcast. The 11 million subscriber number is ten percent higher than the last figure provided in the company's earnings call just over two weeks ago, when it was noted that over 10 million had signed up.

During that call, Apple's chief executive Tim Cook emphasized that Apple had also reached the milestone of one billion devices in its active installed base. Cue's total of iCloud users is about 78 percent of that figure, which he explained was due to the fact that many people own multiple devices.

Cue said that Apple's 782 million iCloud users contribute to a crush of photo uploads, iMessage communications and iTunes and App Store purchases. At peak operating status, the company's cloud currently processes over 200,000 iMessages per second, a number that translates to more than 17 billion per day. In addition, combined iTunes and the App Store purchases clock in at more than 750 million per week.

Cue and Federighi also addressed Walt Mossberg's critique of Apple's first-party app development efforts. Mossberg in a recent post on The Verge pointed to much-maligned issues involving a bloated iTunes client, an aging Mail app and niggling iCloud synchronization problems.

"I know our core software quality has improved over the last five years -- improved significantly. But, the bar just keeps going up, and that's a bar that we embrace," Federighi said. "Every year we realize the things we were good at least year, and the techniques we were using to build the best software we can, are not adequate for the next year because the bar keeps going up."

Federighi goes on to say that niche problems are quickly amplified as devices like iPhone become an integral part of users' daily lives.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 58
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 7,157member
    Free doesn’t pay the bills as Pandora has found out the hard way and now offering itself up for sale.
    cornchiplostkiwijbdragonWiseGuycalimwhiteSpamSandwich
  • Reply 2 of 58
    So Walt and everyone else who complains about the problems wth Mac software these days is wrong, thanks goodness for that, i thought it was Apple doing something less than perfectly.

    "Federighi goes on to say that niche problems are quickly amplified as devices like iPhone become an integral part of users' daily lives."

    Of course they are, because they're not really niche problems anymore because so many users experience the same problems, the same little buggy problems affects millions of users. The response is straight out of the Steve Ballmer playbook.
    xixo
  • Reply 3 of 58
    I listened to the whole thing

    They came across as defensive, not offensive.   Same as Cook on the earnings call

    We know you are at world-wide scale.   Embrace it and make it an advantage.   Act like you are setting the world on fire, which you are.  Don't be so damn understated 

    anantksundaram
  • Reply 4 of 58
    isilver said:
    So Walt and everyone else who complains about the problems wth Mac software these days is wrong, thanks goodness for that, i thought it was Apple doing something less than perfectly.

    "Federighi goes on to say that niche problems are quickly amplified as devices like iPhone become an integral part of users' daily lives."

    Of course they are, because they're not really niche problems anymore because so many users experience the same problems, the same little buggy problems affects millions of users. The response is straight out of the Steve Ballmer playbook.
    You're wrong.
    You've taken everything out of context in attempt to make your point.

    lostkiwijbdragonbrakkenRayz2016WiseGuymwhite
  • Reply 5 of 58
    red oak said:
    I listened to the whole thing

    They came across as defensive, not offensive.   Same as Cook on the earnings call

    We know you are at world-wide scale.   Embrace it and make it an advantage.   Act like you are setting the world on fire, which you are.  Don't be so damn understated 

    I like Craig. And I like the fact that when he was asked about radars he admitted external communion isn't as good as it could be. I wish Gruber would have pushed Cue a bit more on iTunes. I didn't get the sense he really gets how awful and bloated it is. Also there's no way Cue set up a new TV like a customer would because if he had he would have said its not shipping until it has remote app and/or BT keyboard support.
    wonkothesane
  • Reply 6 of 58
    irelandireland Posts: 17,616member
    red oak Also there's no way Cue set up a new TV like a customer would because if he had he would have said its not shipping until it has remote app and/or BT keyboard support.
    I disagree. The Bluetooth keyboardists are a vocal minority and they're adding that feature now. Have some patience. Apple TV has larger problems like Siri Remote only available in limited countries, still no TV Show content plan to compete with Netflix and a remote that cannot decide which way is up.
    edited February 2016 lostkiwijbdragoncalipropodmwhite
  • Reply 7 of 58
    irelandireland Posts: 17,616member
    What I'd like to see from Apple is a serious slowdown of new software features (with one or two useful new features per year added to each platform for the foreseeable future), a clean up across the board on all platforms in terms of optimisations and bug fixes, and simplification of Watch OS with a more cohesive interaction model, a 4.2" iPhone 6s mini (not a budget 4" phone). And a culling of all non-Retina products and some iPad models and a minimum of 256 GB for notebooks across the board with a 32 GB minimum for every iOS devices. And a price drop on high end iPads: 32 GB Air 3 should start at $399 and $299 for 32 GB mini 4. Jumping up $149 for 128 GB models.

    The original 9.7" iPad was $499 for 16 GB, the iPad Air 2 shouldn't be $499 and also 16 GB. After 6 years of iPad and 2 years or more of declining sales it's time to do something radical and offer a compelling product at a better price point. People are sick of all this up-selling. Kill old iPad models and lower the price of the main models and kill all 16 GB models. Make iPad compelling again.
    edited February 2016 brakkenpropodanantksundaram
  • Reply 8 of 58
    ireland said:
    I disagree. The Bluetooth keyboardists are a vocal minority and they're adding that feature now. Have some patience. Apple TV has larger problems like Siri Remote only available in limited countries, still no TV Show content plan to compete with Netflix and a remote that cannot decide which way is up.
    BT keyboard maybe, no excuse for remote app not being there day one. Same with dictation. Release things when they're ready and TV 4 clearly wasn't ready.
    anantksundaram
  • Reply 9 of 58

    ireland said:
    What I'd like to see from Apple is a serious slowdown of new software features (with one or two useful features add per year added to each platform, a clean up across the board on all platforms in terms of optimisations and bug fixes, and simplification of Watch OS with a more cohesive interaction model, a 4.2" iPhone 6s mini (not a budget 4" phone). And a culling of all non-Retina products and some iPad models and a minimum of 256GB for notebooks across the board with a 32 GB minimum for all iOS devices.
    I use my Watch every day and have no issues with it. Sure Apple can do more with regards to more intelligent notifications and more/better watch faces but I have no issues using the Watch interface. None. Zero. Dead simple to me.
    jbdragon
  • Reply 10 of 58
    red oak said:
    I listened to the whole thing

    They came across as defensive, not offensive.   Same as Cook on the earnings call

    We know you are at world-wide scale.   Embrace it and make it an advantage.   Act like you are setting the world on fire, which you are.  Don't be so damn understated 

    Thanks for the assertiveness suggestion, faceless anonymous internet drone.

    I think it's pretty close to ballpark that the tone of Apple executive interviews has less than 1% impact on sales of whiz bang, shiny, fun Apple products. 
  • Reply 11 of 58
    Imagine how many paid Apple Music subscribers could they have if they combined it with 1TB iCloud tier for the same $10?
    10x of what it is now easily!
    lostkiwisatchmoireland
  • Reply 12 of 58
    levilevi Posts: 344member
    From the interview, updayed iOS remote app coming. 
  • Reply 13 of 58
    red oak said:
    I listened to the whole thing

    They came across as defensive, not offensive.   Same as Cook on the earnings call

    We know you are at world-wide scale.   Embrace it and make it an advantage.   Act like you are setting the world on fire, which you are.  Don't be so damn understated 

    I like Craig. And I like the fact that when he was asked about radars he admitted external communion isn't as good as it could be. I wish Gruber would have pushed Cue a bit more on iTunes. I didn't get the sense he really gets how awful and bloated it is. Also there's no way Cue set up a new TV like a customer would because if he had he would have said its not shipping until it has remote app and/or BT keyboard support.
    I dont think bloated is the right term to use with iTunes. I think the software just has a horrible UI, which people are misconstruing as bloat. 
    mwhite
  • Reply 14 of 58
    wigbywigby Posts: 690member
    isilver said:
    So Walt and everyone else who complains about the problems wth Mac software these days is wrong, thanks goodness for that, i thought it was Apple doing something less than perfectly.

    "Federighi goes on to say that niche problems are quickly amplified as devices like iPhone become an integral part of users' daily lives."

    Of course they are, because they're not really niche problems anymore because so many users experience the same problems, the same little buggy problems affects millions of users. The response is straight out of the Steve Ballmer playbook.
    Would an apology to really matter? They are doing the best they can do considering their current focus.
  • Reply 15 of 58
    I like Craig. And I like the fact that when he was asked about radars he admitted external communion isn't as good as it could be. I wish Gruber would have pushed Cue a bit more on iTunes. I didn't get the sense he really gets how awful and bloated it is. Also there's no way Cue set up a new TV like a customer would because if he had he would have said its not shipping until it has remote app and/or BT keyboard support.
    I dont think bloated is the right term to use with iTunes. I think the software just has a horrible UI, which people are misconstruing as bloat. 
    I still call it bloat. Tries to do too much. The other thing I don't like is the music app on iOS devices has basically become an Music app. What about people that aren't interested in subscribing to Music?  One shouldn't have to going to settings to turn it off. I think Music should have been a separate app available on the App Store that could be deleted. Obviously Apple thinks the only way it can get a large number of Music subscribers is to turn the default (and non-deletable) music app into an Music app.
    brakkenirelandanantksundaram
  • Reply 16 of 58

    wigby said:
    isilver said:
    So Walt and everyone else who complains about the problems wth Mac software these days is wrong, thanks goodness for that, i thought it was Apple doing something less than perfectly.

    "Federighi goes on to say that niche problems are quickly amplified as devices like iPhone become an integral part of users' daily lives."

    Of course they are, because they're not really niche problems anymore because so many users experience the same problems, the same little buggy problems affects millions of users. The response is straight out of the Steve Ballmer playbook.
    Would an apology to really matter? They are doing the best they can do considering their current focus.
    Maybe not an apology but at least acknowledging people's concerns. Don't use the large user base as an excuse (if Jobs/Cook didn't set the company up to be able to scale well that's a problem) and don't dismiss complaints as people stuck in their ways not receptive to change. I'm sure there's some of that. But there are also people who have legitimate issues/annoyances. One that I have is I'll delete emails and 5 seconds later they'll reappear, sometimes as unread other times as read. Just today I had one email that I deleted 5 different times, it just kept coming back. Little annoyances like that can add up, especially if there's a lot of them, and that's not something Apple's going to see on a diagnostics or crash report and probably won't show up in a radar.
    ireland
  • Reply 17 of 58
    ksecksec Posts: 1,564member
    The numbers for iCloud users, consider most of my non techie users dont even use iCloud Backup i am rather surprised by its results.
  • Reply 18 of 58
    jason98 said:
    Imagine how many paid Apple Music subscribers could they have if they combined it with 1TB iCloud tier for the same $10?
    10x of what it is now easily!
    No amount of money will help me enjoy Apple Music simply because I really dislike the format. I'd pay money to return to the Music app as the iPod app!  11m of 700m+ users surely indicates dissatisfaction with this service.  
  • Reply 19 of 58
    I dont think bloated is the right term to use with iTunes. I think the software just has a horrible UI, which people are misconstruing as bloat. 
    I still call it bloat. Tries to do too much. The other thing I don't like is the music app on iOS devices has basically become an Music app. What about people that aren't interested in subscribing to Music?  One shouldn't have to going to settings to turn it off. I think Music should have been a separate app available on the App Store that could be deleted. Obviously Apple thinks the only way it can get a large number of Music subscribers is to turn the default (and non-deletable) music app into an Music app.
    One million percent agree. I rarely listen to Music: random songs removed, Genres gone, repeatedly being begged to subscribe. I already paid for the music I want to listen to, and for the phone. With $200b in the bank, I fail to see the necessity. 
  • Reply 20 of 58
    ksec said:
    The numbers for iCloud users, consider most of my non techie users dont even use iCloud Backup i am rather surprised by its results.
    I guess if you have Apple ID you are automatically an iCloud user?
    xixo
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