Donald Trump says Apple should back down in San Bernardino case

Posted:
in iPhone edited February 2016
Surprise right-wing presidential candidate Donald Trump weighed in on Apple's fight with the U.S. government on Wednesday, saying the iPhone maker should acquiesce to the FBI's demands and dismissing company CEO Tim Cook's argument that such action would set a dangerous precedent.




"To think that Apple won't allow us to get into her cellphone? Who do they think they are?" Trump said during an interview, as noted by Business Insider. "No, we have to open it."

The reality television star was referring to comments made by Apple CEO Tim Cook in an open letter posted earlier in the day. Cook vowed to oppose a court order demanding that Apple create a compromised version of iOS to assist the investigation into the San Bernardino terror attack, arguing that doing so would be a net negative to society.

"The FBI may use different words to describe this tool, but make no mistake: Building a version of iOS that bypasses security in this way would undeniably create a backdoor. And while the government may argue that its use would be limited to this case, there is no way to guarantee such control," Cook wrote.

Trump rejected that interpretation.

"Apple -- this is one case and this a case that certainly we should be able to get into the phone," he said. "And we should find out what happened, why it happened, and maybe there's other people involved. And we have to do that."

It's not immediately clear whether Apple could comply, even if it wanted to. The device in question is already encrypted and locked, though it is an older iPhone 5c that does not contain the same secure enclave and advanced cryptographic features found in more recent models.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 138
    Further proof this guy is a idiot. 
    SpamSandwichsandse7enirelandpmzfotoformatredgeminipahorvaticcalicornchiptomkarl
  • Reply 2 of 138
    rs9rs9 Posts: 68member
    The more I hear Trump the more he sounds like a Communist/Socialist.  He supports more government intervention.  He criticizes Corporate America by moving over seas (Ford, Carrier, etc).  knowing full well a corporations largest expense is salary and health benefits. This is why the Trump line of clothes is made in China. 
    SpamSandwichaaplfanboyredgeminipahorvaticcalichiasuddenly newtonsergiozlolliverapple head
  • Reply 3 of 138
    wood1208wood1208 Posts: 1,988member
    It seems no brainer that Apple should help to uncover data from such terrorists phone but certainly against providing blanket backdoor. There is a difference. FBI or NSA is run by humans and they can abuse against us open backdoor into anyone's phone. We give away much of our privacy willing or unwilling or unknowingly agreeing to vising websites or using apps. All apps ask user to access this and that on your phone and we agree to install/use the App. Do we know than what app does to your Data ? Many entity on web knows about you more than you think. It's just living in denial that your privacy is a private matter..
    edited February 2016 allmypeopletomkarl
  • Reply 4 of 138
    rs9 said:
    The more I hear Trump the more he sounds like a Communist/Socialist.  He supports more government intervention.  He criticizes Corporate America by moving over seas (Ford, Carrier, etc).  knowing full well a corporations largest expense is salary and health benefits. This is why the Trump line of clothes is made in China. 
    You're right. He's a barely disguised fascist. There are nothing left but really, really bad choices this election.
    horvaticcalipalominecornchipchia
  • Reply 5 of 138
    Good luck to the US citizens if that clown Trump ever gets to be President. In the UK, I think our ‘special relationship’ with the US will be dead in the water. Mind you, we have our own Corbyn clown to put up with.
    redgeminipahorvaticchiadigital_guylolliverbrakken
  • Reply 6 of 138
    wood1208 said:
    It seems no brainer that Apple should help to uncover data from such terrorists phone but certainly against providing blanket backdoor.
    Agreed. If congress would put together some kind of legal framework this would be resolved. The feds used this example from the recent terrorist attack because they know it will engender public support, you can bet this is the tip of an iceberg of requests they currently have with Apple.
    allmypeople
  • Reply 7 of 138
    Most people probably agree with Apple in theory but this is no longer a theoretical debate. CNCB has a poll up on their site and public opinion is split 50-50 Is Cook ready for this PR fight?
    tallest skil
  • Reply 8 of 138
    irelandireland Posts: 17,649member
    Trump needs to go back to saying he'd date his daughter if she wasn't his daughter.
    redgeminipacalipalominechialollivermatrix077justadcomics
  • Reply 9 of 138
    Trump should just shut up!
    redgeminipahorvaticcalijbdragonlolliveriosenthusiast
  • Reply 10 of 138
    wood1208 said:
    It seems no brainer that Apple should help to uncover data from such terrorists phone but certainly against providing blanket backdoor. There is a difference. FBI or NSA is run by humans and they can abuse against us open backdoor into anyone's phone. We give away much of our privacy willing or unwilling or unknowingly agreeing to vising websites or using apps. All apps ask user to access this and that on your phone and we agree to install/use the App. Do we know than what app does to your Data ? Many entity on web knows about you more than you think. It's just living in denial that your privacy is a private matter..
    Encryption and privacy is much like freedom of speech. It has to be protected for the "worst" of us or it will be useless for the "best" of us.

    Trump has "jumped the shark" and proven he's just as bad as his opponents for his constitutional ignorance and statism. 
    edited February 2016 jahbladeredgeminipahorvaticcalipalominetomkarlchianolamacguylolliver
  • Reply 11 of 138
    muppetrymuppetry Posts: 3,328member
    He, as are many others, appears to be assuming that Apple can open the phone. If they can, then faced with a properly obtained court order, they obviously should. But if they can open it then that would presumably mean that there is a backdoor in the encryption implementation, which Apple has repeatedly stated there is not. If there is no way for Apple to open it then the court order is moot.
    civa
  • Reply 12 of 138
    mike1mike1 Posts: 1,911member
    He's simply wrong about this.
    calimwhitelolliver
  • Reply 13 of 138
    He claims to be right wing, but the man's being praised by Code Pink for his 9/11 trutherism and he wants socialized medicine. Keep that in mind before engaging in conservative bashing, commenters. 
    caliSpamSandwich
  • Reply 14 of 138
    imatimat Posts: 166member
    "The reality television star".

    Sir, you just won the internet today.
    calibrakken
  • Reply 15 of 138
    muppetrymuppetry Posts: 3,328member
    Having just read Tim Cook's statements on this I'm now confused. He implies that Apple could create a software tool to break into the phone but that such a tool would be "too dangerous to create" - presumably in the sense that they could not, subsequently, prevent its widespread use as a backdoor to any iPhone.
  • Reply 16 of 138
    pmzpmz Posts: 3,433member
    Sounds like he put a lot of thought into it....

    What a fucking moron.
    redgeminipanolamacguylolliverbrakkenmatrix077Primetek_G
  • Reply 17 of 138
    Are there cryptographic protocols to allow only Apple (or better yet an escrow agent of Apple, but not the FBI), to customize a backdoor-enabled iOS for only *a specific* iPhone, at a minimum cost of say $10M per inspection?   [But not iPhones in general.]  Perhaps the likes of cryptographer David Chaum could figure this one out, using zero-knowledge proof techniques.
  • Reply 18 of 138
    jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,709member
    Dump Trump. Clearly he doesn't understand technology. 
    horvaticcalilolliver
  • Reply 19 of 138
    I thought that Republicans were against government intrusion? 

    Perhaps the issue with Trump is that he has so much going on, he doesn't take the time to stop and really think about the impact of what he is saying. Supporting this decision means that he wants us all to just give up on our privacy.

    We tend to think of government as an entity, but there are people working at these offices that would have access to you information. Where people are involved, there is always a chance for the information to be used in a wrong way.
  • Reply 20 of 138
    tmaytmay Posts: 3,834member
    loquitur said:
    Are there cryptographic protocols to allow only Apple (or better yet an escrow agent of Apple, but not the FBI), to customize a backdoor-enabled iOS for only *a specific* iPhone, at a minimum cost of say $10M per inspection?   [But not iPhones in general.]  Perhaps the likes of cryptographer David Chaum could figure this one out, using zero-knowledge proof techniques.
    The solution would be to create a class of workers that would run the backdoor software in a secure, physical enclave, maybe an old mine, output the contents of a single iPhone, and then kill themselves after their service. Access to the software would be a single AES code given only to the worker, that would unlock the software.

    It has all the makings of a really terrific religion.
    palominebrakken
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