John McAfee offers to decrypt iPhone used by San Bernardino terrorists, criticizes FBI

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 91
    mobius said:
    The FBI will not accept his gracious offer because that is not part of 'their plan'. They want a precedent to be set so that they can gain access to encrypted data whenever they want.
    Absolutely Correct! How dare anyone defy the FBI, oh, sorry Obama.
    jbdragon
  • Reply 22 of 91
    There is an easy out of this quagmire.  Say the US Supreme Court upholds the FBI's request.  Build the altered iOS.  Connect it to the subject unit, and say "Awe-Shit" when the smoke comes out of the memory module.
    brakkencnocbuijustbobfpalomine
  • Reply 23 of 91
    apple ][ said:
    Imagine what would happen if this stunt were to go ahead and if their team were to fail? That would be huge! And even better advertisement for Apple! :#
    What if they succeed? Very bad for Apple. 
  • Reply 24 of 91
    apple ][ said:
    Imagine what would happen if this stunt were to go ahead and if their team were to fail? That would be huge! And even better advertisement for Apple! :#

    Here is what I don't understand...as far as the iPhone in question...it is just your everyday regular iPhone which is locked correct?  Where you type in the 4 (or 6) digits to get in.  So why can't Mr. McAfee simply use anyone's iPhone and just see if he can or cannot crack it using whatever method he thinks will work.  Now he can tell us with absolute certainty whether he can or cannot.  

    I must have missed something about that iPhone being held by the gov't.  In my humble opinion I don't he can crack it and if he could that is not going to bode well for Apple.  
  • Reply 25 of 91
    I don't know the architecture of the 5C but I think that all the keys are in one FLASH.  Can't they just clone the FLASH (see them clone a  FLASH part at when they upgrade a device) so if they brick it with one set of codes, they can re-flash it and keep trying?

    I think that the keys are moved to a secure enclave in the 5s/6 phones but I think that the 5c does not have that feature....
    jbdragon
  • Reply 26 of 91
    look, this whoole thing is so overblown. just have someone on the inside decrypt the phone and have the phone monitored by BOTH sides, while it's being investigated. then dissemble it. that's all that has to be done. btw, if anyone actually believes that the nsa or intelligence here in the us of a, doesn't already know and all this *bleeps nicely* is about private rights, :) you might just want to stick your head back in the sand (yea i know, lol) ~peace thomas :)
  • Reply 27 of 91
    the mensa threshold is too low
  • Reply 28 of 91
    And the next headline I expect to come across on this will reveal that, in fact, there is no such thing as 100% unbreakable encryption, and someone over in Israel or GCHQ already hacked into this phone, and my iPhone 6s, and Tim Cook's, but were just keeping their special capabilities under wraps... Hype, hype, hype. We need to shut down the terror networks, you know? Because in the end it will affect all of us, all our customers and our ability to create freely and sell in a predictable marketplace.
  • Reply 29 of 91
    Guns. McAfee.  >:)
    edited February 2016
  • Reply 30 of 91
    Even if Apple made it so that the phone wasn't erased after ten tries or anything else that prevents brute force hacking not sure they would be able to break the encryption if it has a long passcode. On my iPhone I have a really long passcode as I only need to type it after a restart and use the fingerprint sensor.
    edited February 2016
  • Reply 31 of 91
    I wouldn't trust that psycho piece of trash with my glasses.
  • Reply 32 of 91
    Two things make me highly suspicious of the tech industry's position. One is that decrypting the data on this particular phone necessarily constitutes a hack of all phones. The other is that their commercial needs necessarily and absolutely trump national security. The issue of the balance between national security and our right to privacy is an important one, and this ought to go all the way to the Supreme Court for what will likely be a 4-4 decision. A company like Apple, which uses H(1(B) visas to hire hordes of foreigners to take American jobs here and is constantly invading my phone with its "upgrades" and demands that I agree to this and that legalese just to make fnk phone calls. just doesn't get much sympathy from me. Tim Cook: move yourself and your company to whatever country you feel patriotic toward. Or buy and island and found your own, you unpatriotic corporate profiteer. And McAfee? What is it that makes right-wing billionaires think they should be running the country? Koch wants to destroy environmental laws and OSHA. Trump wants to lead a pack of unwashed, semi-literate old white yahoos to Washington. And this dipstick McAfee, whose software used to freeze my computers years ago, also seems to see the world through the telescope of the rich on high.
    justbobf
  • Reply 33 of 91
    And then you have this...it worked...I just hacked my own iPhone in less than a minute...

  • Reply 34 of 91
    It'll get his face on TV, which is what he really wants. It's an insincere offer. Also, he's no Libertarian if he's offering to break encryption (which he couldn't possibly do anyway).
    How does offering to break encryption not make him a libertarian? No one is forcing him to do it, he's doing it under his own free will which is basically what libertarianism is all about, removing the immorality of government force. 
    justbobf
  • Reply 35 of 91
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,033member
    tmay said:
    apple ][ said:
    Imagine what would happen if this stunt were to go ahead and if their team were to fail? That would be huge! And even better advertisement for Apple! :#
    It is exactly the case that John McAfee could be given any 5C with an unknown 4 digit passcode that he would have to break; it doesn't have to be the singular iPhone 5C in question. I don't believe for an instant that he or his team would meet success in three weeks.
    McAfee's quote uses the word encryption, not unlock. If he was able to bypass encryption then he should be able to prove it with any iPhone 5C running the same iOS version. But I doubt he is talking about actually breaking the encryption and instead finding a security hole to exploit to get into the data or finding the right PIN code. By not using the proper terminology I highly doubt him and his team's abilities.
  • Reply 36 of 91
    If you have not signed the petition to the White House they need 100,000 signatures by 3/18/16. Here's the link: https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/apple-privacy-petition
    badmonk
  • Reply 37 of 91
    We he says he plans on using social engineering I think plans on holding a seance.
    edited February 2016
  • Reply 38 of 91
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 5,990member
    I wouldn't trust this guy to order me Pizza.

    Either way, I don't trust his sincerity.  He either can, or can't.  One does not say "I believe we can"... 

    It's very easy to prove.  Get an iPhone 5c, set it all up with info and give it to him and see if he can crack it first before handing him (or his team) the actual phone.


    justbobf
  • Reply 39 of 91
    tmay said:
    apple ][ said:
    Imagine what would happen if this stunt were to go ahead and if their team were to fail? That would be huge! And even better advertisement for Apple! :#
    It is exactly the case that John McAfee could be given any 5C with an unknown 4 digit passcode that he would have to break; it doesn't have to be the singular iPhone 5C in question. I don't believe for an instant that he or his team would meet success in three weeks.

    He is speaking of using social engineering to figure out what the passcode is for the now expired user; like in the movies where they figure it out in 30 seconds. Only he and his crew won't be able to figure it out, and they would brick the phone.
    More like 5 minutes and if they fail, Tom Cruise gets squished or drowned or something similarly theatrical.  :D
  • Reply 40 of 91
    mobius said:
    The FBI will not accept his gracious offer because that is not part of 'their plan'. They want a precedent to be set so that they can gain access to encrypted data whenever they want.

    exactly, they doing this to get case law to allow them to do what they want in the future, they are using a high profile cases like this to drive the point home even though they have not idea if their is any useful data on the phone, face it not evidence in any case since the people are dead no need to collect evidences since the crime is over and the people are dead.
    hcrefugeepalomine
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