Second-gen August Smart Lock with Apple HomeKit support now shipping

Posted:
in General Discussion edited April 2016
The newly launched August Smart Lock includes support for Apple's HomeKit, allowing users to lock, unlock and check the status of their door lock with voice commands using Siri.




Priced at $229.99, the second-generation August Smart Lock began shipping to customers on Thursday. Integrated HomeKit support means users can control the lock with Siri on a compatible iPhone, iPad, iPod touch or Apple Watch.

Available commands include "lock my door" or the inquiry "is my door locked?"

Because it ties into the HomeKit ecosystem, the August Smart Lock is also compatible with third-party HomeKit apps including Insteon+, Lutron, and iDevices. With these, users can create custom scenes, such as turning lights on or off automatically as their front door is locked or unlocked.




In addition to including a secure chip for HomeKit, the new August Smart Lock features an updated exterior with a new magnetic faceplate. The second-generation lock now also includes micro-patterns that are intended to improve grip and rotation when manually controlling the lock.

The new August Smart Lock has also added a slim chrome visual indicator at the top of the unit, allowing users to easily verify that their door is either locked or unlocked. And it's available in silver and dark gray.

"We are committed to providing value by partnering with companies such as Apple to deliver the features our customers are asking for, including HomeKit integration and support for Siri voice commands," said Jason Johnson, CEO of August Home Inc. "We will continue to develop best-in-class products and partner with leading smart home companies to add convenience to consumers' daily lives and new smart security features that are an essential element of the connected home."




The HomeKit-enabled August Smart Lock was actually announced by the company last October, when it was planned to ship in six to eight weeks. Apparent delays pushed that launch back until shipping began Thursday.

Owners of the first-generation August lock won't be able to access HomeKit, because Apple's smart home platform requires the inclusion of a secure authentication chip. The original model without HomeKit support remains available for $199
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 35
    rob53rob53 Posts: 2,086member
    The exploded diagram is confusing. You're looking at a big knob from the inside of the house. It uses the existing locking mechanism and is simply an automated interior handle. That's a pricey doorknob. http://august.com/products/august-smart-lock/
  • Reply 2 of 35
    razorpitrazorpit Posts: 1,003member
    rob53 said:
    The exploded diagram is confusing. You're looking at a big knob from the inside of the house. It uses the existing locking mechanism and is simply an automated interior handle. That's a pricey doorknob. http://august.com/products/august-smart-lock/
    If you think that is expensive, take a look at how much Phillips charges for a light switch and bulb... ;-)
    edited April 2016 ireland
  • Reply 3 of 35
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 1,006member
    All the Homekit stuff is mighty pricey. Seemingly it's to do with beefy CPUs required to support the strong encryption Apple mandates. Bluetooth's not been compromised, and that doesn't need powerful CPUs so dunno what the reasoning is.
  • Reply 4 of 35
    razorpitrazorpit Posts: 1,003member
    elijahg said:
    All the Homekit stuff is mighty pricey. Seemingly it's to do with beefy CPUs required to support the strong encryption Apple mandates. Bluetooth's not been compromised, and that doesn't need powerful CPUs so dunno what the reasoning is.
    I agree on the price, but a lot of it has to do with being an early adopter.  The companies have to recover their R&D as quickly as possible.  People who have the money (and even some that don't) will pay it just to be the "kool" kid on the street as they drive off to the coffee shop in their Tesla.

    Regarding the beefy chips, it is for if and when some day Bluetooth is hacked, people can't go back to Apple and say why didn't you do more?
    irelandjbdragonnolamacguy
  • Reply 5 of 35
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,791member
    There are several different lock companies with hundreds of different designs similar to the one shown. I can't imagine that it would be compatible with all of them. On their website they offer a Schlage lock if you need one. I'd be surprised if it was even compatible with all Schlage models. I have Baldwin. It is doubtful that it would be compatible but don't bother going to their website, there is apparently no information regarding compatibility.
  • Reply 6 of 35
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,791member
    razorpit said:

     People who have the money (and even some that don't) will pay it just to be the "kool" kid on the street as they drive off to the coffee shop in their Tesla.

    People who drive Teslas don't have locks like that on their front door. They have super high end locks made in Europe, Israel, or perhaps Baldwin made in USA. You aren't going to find a Schlage lock on the front door of a million dollar home.
    edited April 2016 xzucornchip
  • Reply 7 of 35
    razorpitrazorpit Posts: 1,003member
    volcan said:
    razorpit said:

     People who have the money (and even some that don't) will pay it just to be the "kool" kid on the street as they drive off to the coffee shop in their Tesla.

    People who drive Teslas don't have locks like that on their front door. They have super high end locks made in Europe, Israel, or perhaps Baldwin made in USA. You aren't going to find a Schlage lock on the front door of a million dollar home.
    Everybody who has a podcast on iTunes seemingly has a deposit on a Tesla.  I'm willing to bet a large portion of them have a Schlage lock and don't have million dollar homes.  
    irelandcornchip
  • Reply 8 of 35
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 2,485member
    HomeKit stuff in general, and this door lock concept in particular, are much like the idea of taking a cruise vacation. It looks good, sounds good in the abstract. Then the reality sets in that perhaps there are other people on the boat, you can't get off, there is a bill for everything, and that flag on the tail is from a country with no laws. Maybe this stuff works...until it doesn't. 
    razorpitvolcanireland
  • Reply 9 of 35
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,791member
    razorpit said:

    Everybody who has a podcast on iTunes seemingly has a deposit on a Tesla.  I'm willing to bet a large portion of them have a Schlage lock and don't have million dollar homes.  
    I'm willing to bet a large portion of them will never receive their car. Point is, a large portion of current Tesla owners are wealthy enough to afford a million dollar home. Here in Southern California or in the Bay area, a million dollars barely buys you a track home.
    edited April 2016 cornchipelijahg
  • Reply 10 of 35

    Mmm ... What if you allow the door to be opened by someone to walk your dog ...  and she brings a friend with her?

    Using the same logic, the notification/logs show the door was opened and closed by someone approved, but does not identify others entering at the same time.  For example, all the kids [usually] walk home from school together -- but only the one who opens the door generates a notification/log entry.  What about the others?

  • Reply 11 of 35
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,791member

    Mmm ... What if you allow the door to be opened by someone to walk your dog ...  and she brings a friend with her?

    Using the same logic, the notification/logs show the door was opened and closed by someone approved, but does not identify others entering at the same time.  For example, all the kids [usually] walk home from school together -- but only the one who opens the door generates a notification/log entry.  What about the others?

    You have surveillance cameras that also send you a notification.
    irelandcornchip
  • Reply 12 of 35
    macguimacgui Posts: 1,460member
    eightzero said:
     Maybe this stuff works...until it doesn't. 
    Yeah, like you car's power windows, A/C, the starter...
    nolamacguy
  • Reply 13 of 35
    irelandireland Posts: 17,669member
    The above-the-law US alphabet soup agencies are licking their lips. 
    cornchip
  • Reply 14 of 35
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,791member
    macgui said:
    eightzero said:
     Maybe this stuff works...until it doesn't. 
    Yeah, like you car's power windows, A/C, the starter...
    Your car analogy is using a battery with between 40-120 Ah and is being recharged daily. Personally, I wouldn't want a door lock run by two AA batteries. Seems like a gimmick to me.
    edited April 2016
  • Reply 15 of 35
    volcan said:

    Mmm ... What if you allow the door to be opened by someone to walk your dog ...  and she brings a friend with her?

    Using the same logic, the notification/logs show the door was opened and closed by someone approved, but does not identify others entering at the same time.  For example, all the kids [usually] walk home from school together -- but only the one who opens the door generates a notification/log entry.  What about the others?

    You have surveillance cameras that also send you a notification.
    Exactly ...

    But the cams need to be integrated with the door openings/closings to identify who and when -- then create concise logs/notifications, e.g.:
    • 3:18 PM Billy, Sally and Tommy arrived home
    • 4:06 PM Sally left
    • 4:08 PM Billy's 2 unidentified friends arrived 

  • Reply 16 of 35
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 2,485member
    macgui said:
    eightzero said:
     Maybe this stuff works...until it doesn't. 
    Yeah, like you car's power windows, A/C, the starter...
    Yup. More internetofshit.com 
  • Reply 17 of 35
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,791member
    dick applebaum said:

    But the cams need to be integrated with the door openings/closings to identify who and when -- then create concise logs/notifications, e.g.:
    Not really. Most modern camera systems send you a notification when they detect motion near the front door, regardless of whether the door is opened or not.
  • Reply 18 of 35
    macguimacgui Posts: 1,460member

    rob53 said:
    The exploded diagram is confusing. You're looking at a big knob from the inside of the house. It uses the existing locking mechanism and is simply an automated interior handle. That's a pricey doorknob. http://august.com/products/august-smart-lock/
    It wasn't confusing to me. I immediately saw that this was the concept I prefer- from the outside, the lock will work with a key, and is not recognizable as a 'smartlock', and will work with some existing hardware.  This is a pricey convenience but possibly worth the money to early adopters whether they can afford to be such, or as some prefer to believe, need to be 'kool' with geek chic.

    The point of compatibility is a good one. This will be a very simple bolt-on in some cases. In others, like mine, the interior knob and thumb latch are surrounded by an escutcheon that would interfere. At some point, if the August site becomes more helpful, there might be a workaround. I'm not sure my lockset will function without the escutcheon. 

    Now cue the 'more money than good sense' and 'locks only keep honest people out' fanbois.
    volcanjwdawso
  • Reply 19 of 35
    zoetmbzoetmb Posts: 2,481member
    Most door locks default lock (but don't double lock) when they close.     With the possible exception of when someone has a bunch of contractors, dog walkers, maids, etc., who need to get into the house, this sounds like a solution to a problem that doesn't exist.    But perhaps I'm biased because I live in a relatively small apartment and the last thing I need is a "connected home".   


  • Reply 20 of 35
    pmzpmz Posts: 3,433member
    The real problem is having a door that be latched/unlatched without any assistance.

    If you have a front door that requires any sort of effort (push or pull) to align the dead bolt, you're going to go out of your mind trying to fix and align it when installing any of these unattended deadbolts.
    cornchip
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