Schiller schools internet on correct Apple device plurals, but Cook says 'iPad Pros'

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 52
    brakkenbrakken Posts: 687member
    Many jokes facetious
    fail to eyebrows a-raise
    the dullards blunder on
    and nonenculature's appraised. 
    baconstang
  • Reply 22 of 52
    brakkenbrakken Posts: 687member

    asdasd said:
    Schiller was taking the piss of Evans. Of course the plural of iPad is iPads. What's not correct is iPads Pro and that's what Schiller was obliquely joking about.

    The plural is  iPad Pros. The iPad Pro is the singular name of the device. 

    The only reason why attorney general is pluralised to attorneys general is because this phrase is a direct transliteration of the French. In English it means head attorney. General is the adjective. 

    Ive no idea why anybody thinks the plural of trader joe is traders joe. 
    This entire discussion embodies the style and elegance Apple embues its products with. It's not often French surfaces anymore, but for Apple ;)
    asdasdbaconstang
  • Reply 23 of 52
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,323member
    latifbp said:
    apple ][ said:
    I am siding with Tim Cook on this one. 

    Let's say that I am asking my friend how many iPads they own. Which of these am I going to choose?

    (1) How many iPad do you own?    
    (2) How many iPad devices do you own?
    (3) How many iPads do you own?

    I am obviously choosing #3, as that makes most sense, it's most logical, and anybody opting for #1 or #2 is just somebody who obviously must have various issues, hopefully none too serious.

    I am sorry, but saying "I have 3 Macintosh" just sounds semi-retarded, and I will have no part of it.
    To be proper is logical, it's just not the path of least resistance which you seem to find most comfortable
    What's proper about Schiller's joke grammar?
  • Reply 24 of 52
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,323member
    brakken said:

    asdasd said:
    Schiller was taking the piss of Evans. Of course the plural of iPad is iPads. What's not correct is iPads Pro and that's what Schiller was obliquely joking about.

    The plural is  iPad Pros. The iPad Pro is the singular name of the device. 

    The only reason why attorney general is pluralised to attorneys general is because this phrase is a direct transliteration of the French. In English it means head attorney. General is the adjective. 

    Ive no idea why anybody thinks the plural of trader joe is traders joe. 
    This entire discussion embodies the style and elegance Apple embues its products with. It's not often French surfaces anymore, but for Apple ;)
    It's still common in France. I hear. 
  • Reply 25 of 52
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,985member
    paxman said:
    iPads Pro, though :s 
    iPhones 6s?
    MacBooks Air?
    Somebody needs to get hurt. 
    The noun gets the plural not the adjective. 
    In iPad Pro the word iPad is the noun and 'Pro' describes it since there are a few different models of iPads, so iPads Pro is grammatically correct. 
  • Reply 26 of 52
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,323member
    paxman said:
    iPads Pro, though :s 
    iPhones 6s?
    MacBooks Air?
    Somebody needs to get hurt. 
    The noun gets the plural not the adjective. 
    In iPad Pro the word iPad is the noun and 'Pro' describes it since there are a few different models of iPads, so iPads Pro is grammatically correct. 
    1) adjectives come before nouns in English. 
    2) the iPad Pro is a brand name. Just as the plural of Walkman is Walkmans the plural of iPad Pro is iPad Pros. 
  • Reply 27 of 52
    Schiller has it wrong. It's pack of Macintosh, an iPad herd, and a school of iPhoneii. Case settled  :)
    baconstangpscooter63fastasleep
  • Reply 28 of 52
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,985member
    asdasd said:
    The noun gets the plural not the adjective. 
    In iPad Pro the word iPad is the noun and 'Pro' describes it since there are a few different models of iPads, so iPads Pro is grammatically correct. 
    1) adjectives come before nouns in English. 
    2) the iPad Pro is a brand name. Just as the plural of Walkman is Walkmans the plural of iPad Pro is iPad Pros. 
    Adjectives can come after. Even though they're part of the name 'Pro', and 'mini' still describe the model of iPad, so the plural goes on the noun. 
  • Reply 29 of 52
    Wrong. Its not an adjective. Come on now.
    It's a Make and Model. Like: Chevy Cobalt. Do you say Chevy's Cobalt? Of course not. 
    edited April 2016 asdasd
  • Reply 30 of 52
    Maybe Schiller is subconsciously unhappy with where things have gone but can't leave because the money is too great. This is pressing news?
  • Reply 31 of 52
    techlovertechlover Posts: 879member
    I like 'iPads Pro' myself.  Like 'attorneys general' or 'Traders Joe'.

    But he is right "It's all fun until someone gets hurt."   Then it's hilarious!
    But it is Trader Joe's.

    http://www.traderjoes.com/

    How about Carl's Jr. instead?

    But since there are more than one Carl's Jr. wouldn't that make it Carl's Jr.s?

    :)
    baconstang
  • Reply 32 of 52
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,985member
    7eregrine said:
    Wrong. Its not an adjective. Come on now.
    It's a Make and Model. Like: Chevy Cobalt. Do you say Chevy's Cobalt? Of course not. 
    Apple is the make, and iPad is the model. 
  • Reply 33 of 52
    techlover said:
    I like 'iPads Pro' myself.  Like 'attorneys general' or 'Traders Joe'.

    But he is right "It's all fun until someone gets hurt."   Then it's hilarious!
    But it is Trader Joe's.

    http://www.traderjoes.com/

    How about Carl's Jr. instead?

    But since there are more than one Carl's Jr. wouldn't that make it Carl's Jr.s?

    :)
    I thought the last line would make the intent of the previous lines clear.  Too bad I couldn't rename the "Dislike" button to "Don't get the joke".
  • Reply 34 of 52
    oakie said:
    do you say, "hand me some Kleenex," or "hand me some Kleenexes," or "hand me some Kleenex tissues"? or do you avoid the conundrum altogether by just calling it what it is, tissue paper? and if the latter, do you pluralize it as "tissue papers" or "tissues paper"? XD
    Yes, that's correct, as Schiller instructs.  Like oakie's "Kleenex" example.  As with sheep.  Or beef.  Or corn.  Farmer: "I have on my farm ten beef and twenty sheep, and I grow corn".  Not beefs, not sheeps, not corns. 

    Back when there was only one model of iPad, perhaps one could use the "iPads" construct for multiple devices.  However, now "iPad" refers descriptively to the type of product.  So the plural can be correctly written as "I own five iPad".
    edited April 2016
  • Reply 35 of 52
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,323member
    7eregrine said:
    Wrong. Its not an adjective. Come on now.
    It's a Make and Model. Like: Chevy Cobalt. Do you say Chevy's Cobalt? Of course not. 
    Correct. It's absolutely not an adjective. It's part of a trade name, a compound noun. Might be easier to think of how you would pluralise were it called iPadPro or iPad-Pro. 

    Modern english doesnt have adjectives after the noun (that's the grammatical rule you should care about if you think the pro in iPad Pro is an adjective), what few cases that exist in English from the past (attorneys general, lords justice or editors in chief) are based on French influenced English from a long time ago, just as English used to use er or en like German for plurals (both in the plural of child) but all modern neologisms use s. 

    But most importantly pro is not a adjective in iPad Pro nor the MacBook Pro just part of the name (the model) , the plural adds an s. 
    edited April 2016
  • Reply 36 of 52
    pmzpmz Posts: 3,433member
    apple ][ said:
    I am siding with Tim Cook on this one. 

    Let's say that I am asking my friend how many iPads they own. Which of these am I going to choose?

    (1) How many iPad do you own?    
    (2) How many iPad devices do you own?
    (3) How many iPads do you own?

    I am obviously choosing #3, as that makes most sense, it's most logical, and anybody opting for #1 or #2 is just somebody who obviously must have various issues, hopefully none too serious.

    I am sorry, but saying "I have 3 Macintosh" just sounds semi-retarded, and I will have no part of it.
    You forgot "How much iPad do you own."

    "A lot. A lot of iPad."
    baconstang
  • Reply 37 of 52
    pmzpmz Posts: 3,433member

    oakie said:
    apple ][ said:
    I am siding with Tim Cook on this one. 

    Let's say that I am asking my friend how many iPads they own. Which of these am I going to choose?

    (1) How many iPad do you own?    
    (2) How many iPad devices do you own?
    (3) How many iPads do you own?

    I am obviously choosing #3, as that makes most sense, it's most logical, and anybody opting for #1 or #2 is just somebody who obviously must have various issues, hopefully none too serious.

    I am sorry, but saying "I have 3 Macintosh" just sounds semi-retarded, and I will have no part of it.
    do you say, "hand me some Kleenex," or "hand me some Kleenexes," or "hand me some Kleenex tissues"? or do you avoid the conundrum altogether by just calling it what it is, tissue paper? and if the latter, do you pluralize it as "tissue papers" or "tissues paper"? XD
    None of the above.

    They're fucking called: "tissues" by every human being.
  • Reply 38 of 52
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    For the plural of two word names, we may as well get really stupid with it.

    iPads Pro, MacBooks Air, iPhones SE, etc.
    asdasd
  • Reply 39 of 52
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,985member
    asdasd said:
    7eregrine said:
    Wrong. Its not an adjective. Come on now.
    It's a Make and Model. Like: Chevy Cobalt. Do you say Chevy's Cobalt? Of course not. 
    Correct. It's absolutely not an adjective. It's part of a trade name, a compound noun. Might be easier to think of how you would pluralise were it called iPadPro or iPad-Pro. 

    Modern english doesnt have adjectives after the noun (that's the grammatical rule you should care about if you think the pro in iPad Pro is an adjective), what few cases that exist in English from the past (attorneys general, lords justice or editors in chief) are based on French influenced English from a long time ago, just as English used to use er or en like German for plurals (both in the plural of child) but all modern neologisms use s. 

    But most importantly pro is not a adjective in iPad Pro nor the MacBook Pro just part of the name (the model) , the plural adds an s. 
    If someone asked you "what color is the car?" and you answer "the car's blue" then the adjective comes after the noun thus blowing your modern English claim out of the water. 
    baconstang
  • Reply 40 of 52
    zoetmbzoetmb Posts: 2,482member
    Is this 28 days late?
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