Google I/O 2016: Android's Instant Apps seek to solve a key mobile problem

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  • Reply 41 of 44
    applesauce007applesauce007 Posts: 1,685member
    cropr said:
    cali said:Hey man good points. Keep developing apps exclusively for Apple, that's where the money is and android isn't even worth the headache.

    What really irritates me is this whole "Apple is evil" mentally from media puppet morons. It's sad because Apple is the only tech company concerned about human rights and the environment.
    Do these people not know how evil Google is? 

    im learning app development slowly but when I do release my apps they will be Apple exclusive. I don't support thieves and I won't support 4,000 different knockoff devices either. What a headache.
    I, as owner/founder of an app development company, wish you luck by only releasing iOS apps. 
    My company has currently developed 7 apps.  It costs me around 50K to develop an app for iOS or Android, and 65K to develop to develop an app for iOS and Android.  5 of my apps are just loss making, the other 2 are only profitable because they are available on both iOS and Android.
    If one of my iOS app has made 70K of revenue, I am just break even (while Apple just have cashed 20K).  If I can add to the 40K Android revenues to the 70K, I've made around 15K profit   
    It is not so easy to find a gap in the app space that is not occupied and  where you can make money.  If you eventually have developed an app that gets some traction, it makes more sense to make that app available on both platforms.  Finding an new opportunity that will also be profitable can be really hard.  You'll quickly learn that pride does not pay bills.
    Apps are tested on 7 Android devices (different size and different OS version) and on 5 iOS devices (different size and different OS version).  That is not a huge difference.



    Bullshit!
    It costs much less to develop high quality apps for iOS and iOS users are willing to pay for their apps.
    Apple development tools are decades ahead of Android and the Android Java API was stolen from Oracle who is now suing Google.
    patchythepirate
  • Reply 42 of 44
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,395member
    cropr said:
    cali said:Hey man good points. Keep developing apps exclusively for Apple, that's where the money is and android isn't even worth the headache.

    What really irritates me is this whole "Apple is evil" mentally from media puppet morons. It's sad because Apple is the only tech company concerned about human rights and the environment.
    Do these people not know how evil Google is? 

    im learning app development slowly but when I do release my apps they will be Apple exclusive. I don't support thieves and I won't support 4,000 different knockoff devices either. What a headache.
    I, as owner/founder of an app development company, wish you luck by only releasing iOS apps. 
    My company has currently developed 7 apps.  It costs me around 50K to develop an app for iOS or Android, and 65K to develop to develop an app for iOS and Android.  5 of my apps are just loss making, the other 2 are only profitable because they are available on both iOS and Android.
    If one of my iOS app has made 70K of revenue, I am just break even (while Apple just have cashed 20K).  If I can add to the 40K Android revenues to the 70K, I've made around 15K profit   
    It is not so easy to find a gap in the app space that is not occupied and  where you can make money.  If you eventually have developed an app that gets some traction, it makes more sense to make that app available on both platforms.  Finding an new opportunity that will also be profitable can be really hard.  You'll quickly learn that pride does not pay bills.
    Apps are tested on 7 Android devices (different size and different OS version) and on 5 iOS devices (different size and different OS version).  That is not a huge difference.



    Bullshit!
    It costs much less to develop high quality apps for iOS and iOS users are willing to pay for their apps.
    Apple development tools are decades ahead of Android and the Android Java API was stolen from Oracle who is now suing Google.
    Oooh, so you're an experienced developer too who disagrees with another developer who uses the available tools for both platforms.  /s
    edited May 2016 singularity
  • Reply 43 of 44
    os2babaos2baba Posts: 262member
    Boy! Way to completely miss the point of Instant Apps!!

    It's not to solve the fragmentation problem.  WTF? There is, for the most part, no OS fragmentation for developers. When I write an Android app, I don't write a million versions for a million devices. I write one app with 4 sets of resources for 4 screen sizes and depending on whether I'm targeting tablets or not, a few layouts in XML. And using the Support Library, I can write apps that go all the way back to Froyo (I think) - but I just typically go back to Lollipop (which gives me 63% of users). Nobody's asked me for an older version. If that had, I'll just set min version to Kitkat which gives me 95% of the devices. So to sum up, from my perspective as a developer, fragmentation is a non issue.

    However, from my perspective as a consumer, fragmentation is indeed a problem for Android. Consumers don't get OS updates and Security updates in time. However, with Play Services, they still get large swathes of what is traditionally considered as OS updates. Still that's not good enough. And IMO, this is just about the only area where Apple's totally nailed it - and from Day 1.

    So what's the advantage of Instant Apps? I'm not sure how big of an impact it will be and how many developers are going to take advantage of it. Time will tell. But the intent is twofold. First is Discovery. If you are browsing and you come across something interesting and go to the organization's web page, you may find that they have a app(let) that you could use right away. Without having to go into the Play Store and installing the app on the phone, you could try out the functionality by simply clicking a button and the app running instantaneously on your phone. It's never installed and like a web page, once you exit it, it's gone from the phone. That's the second advantage. If you don't want to clutter up your phone with a bunch of apps that you use infrequently, this is a good way to get the best of both worlds.

    Last week, I wanted to view the Sqlite database of an app I'm building and I went to the Play Store and downloaded 6 apps to try them out. With Instant Apps, it would have been a much faster process, limiting the amount of time I spent evaluating them. That's not one of Google's use cases. But it would be useful, if it happened - even from the Play Store.
    edited May 2016 gatorguy
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