Tim Cook says AI & augmented reality are core technologies in Apple's future

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  • Reply 21 of 54
    SoliSoli Posts: 9,186member
    The only app that successfully utilizes AR is Pokemon Go. The rest are not that useful despite they look cool. 
    Is Pokemon go "the only app that successfully utilized AR" or is Pokemon Go "the only successful app that utilized AR"?
    edited August 2016 baconstang
  • Reply 22 of 54
    For most of us AR is useful but VR? In our daily lives? Just wait until someone gets stopped by the traffic cops for wearing a VR Headset and trying to drive their car down the '405' in LA in the rush hour.
    The 'I thought the road was empty of traffic' excuse won't cut it as will be evidenced by the carnage left behind.
    I remain unconvinced about VR and its usefulness for about 99% of the population in their normal lives (not playing Games ok)

    AI will have big implications for us. It probably is doing so already but we just don't know it yet. AI done right will be a boon to society but done wrong... There is the risk of Armageddon if we let the AI rule our decision making. I wonder if we, as the human race are ready for a really good AI system? Are we able to distinguish between the good and the inevitable bad decisions it will make? After all if we feed it garbage data will we slavishly follow its decisions? That will be interesting to watch.

  • Reply 23 of 54
    Dracarys said:
    How do you figure they're the only ones who can pull it off? That's absolutely not true.
    Just going off their track record. Tablets, smartphones, a commercial GUI, PMPs… they even sparked USB adoption, never mind forced the format to modernize itself 16 years later.
    Which is fine, Apple will most likely be successful in it, but to say that they're the only one who can is a lie. 
  • Reply 24 of 54

    macxpress said:
    I have a feeling they're kinda doing something big!
    Agreed.  On the most recent earnings call, Tim spoke enthusiastically about AR/VR several times.  Traditionally he only does that once Apple has made an internal commitment to release a new product or capability.  I think the launch-sequence for something has started...

    I suspect it's Apple services capabilities driven/exploited by Apple hardware.

    For example, it appears as if many Siri capabilities, such as schedule an appointment, play a song or set a reminder, will be handled locally on the device (not requiring any immediate Internet connection).  Then, when needed or convenient (e.g. WiFi available), Siri can engage its cloud backend to update/share the local device changes.  Finally,Siri can take advantage of capabilities, like IBM's Watson, to perform deeper AI services.

    "Hey Siri: I have a week. Plan an Itinerary to Harrisburg to visit my aunt Judy, Boston for some great seafood, and NYC to see Hamilton."

    "Hey Siri: Send an email to what's-his-name -- you know what I want to say."

    Here you [will] have disparate companies (Apple, IBM, Cisco, SAP, etc.) each, doing what they do best, to deliver results.

    Oddly [maybe not so much] one catalyst to all this is the development and open-sourcing of the Swift language.

    Then, there's this, circa 1981:






    edited August 2016 tallest skilpscooter63jasenj1
  • Reply 25 of 54
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    "Hey Siri: I have a week. Plan an Itinerary to Harrisburg to visit my aunt Judy, Boston for some great seafood, and NYC to see Hamilton."
    That's bordering on Knowlege Navigator levels of intelligence to carry out such a task. I doubt we'll see anything capable of doing that this side of 2020.
    SpamSandwich
  • Reply 26 of 54
    "Hey Siri: I have a week. Plan an Itinerary to Harrisburg to visit my aunt Judy, Boston for some great seafood, and NYC to see Hamilton."
    That's bordering on Knowlege Navigator levels of intelligence to carry out such a task. I doubt we'll see anything capable of doing that this side of 2020.
    Hey TS,

    Your Mac/iDevice already has all the info about you, your schedule, and your contacts (and when you are making the request).  An aggregation service could use Watson to figure out what and where is practical, then other services, like Yelp, to flesh out the detail options.

    I'd be willing to bet we see something like this (maybe a startup) by YE 2017.

    All without any [google] web searches.

    edited August 2016 roger wade
  • Reply 27 of 54
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member

    bluefire1 said:
    Thanks Tim for pursuing these core technologies, but could you first significantly increase the battery life of the iPhone?

     

    Sorry, but no we won't be doing that.  We ensure that all our devices have just enough battery life on the day you buy them.  That way, in a years time they won't, because of the way Li-ion batteries start degrading the minute they are manufactured.  So, at around three years - remember we told you that's all the life you could expect - your device will have half the battery life it did when new and you will find it intollerable, which should be really good incentive for you to buy another from us.  A lot of people think we are obsessed with thinness, that's OK, we don't mind that, but really, with all the technological advancements from our suppliers, if we kept our products the same thickness, we would have to fill them up with battery, then the device would last a lot longer than 'enough' on the day you bought it, so in three years, you might still find it useful.  I'm sure you can see why that isn't in anyone's interest.
    singularitygatorguyroger wade
  • Reply 28 of 54
    I admit that I'm on the loser & loner side of things.  I'm not married, not in a relationship, not dating, I have a full time job that pays well, and an apartment.  I don't use Siri at all as I've not found a single use for it.  I can see how people "with lives" could benefit from AI, but I don't see it helping me any more than Siri currently helps me.  I suspect there are plenty of people just like me out there.  It seems to me that AI would only be successful if it helps everyone, not just those fortunate enough to, "have a life".
  • Reply 29 of 54
    I admit that I'm on the loser & loner side of things.  I'm not married, not in a relationship, not dating, I have a full time job that pays well, and an apartment.  I don't use Siri at all as I've not found a single use for it.  I can see how people "with lives" could benefit from AI, but I don't see it helping me any more than Siri currently helps me.  I suspect there are plenty of people just like me out there.  It seems to me that AI would only be successful if it helps everyone, not just those fortunate enough to, "have a life".
    Do you ever get sick, in an accident or need help?

    What if your iDevice could monitor those and take an IFTTT action?

    My 17-year-old grandson has heart palpitations (racing heartbeat).  There's an iPhone app that can measure that -- if you are able to invoke the app and hold your finger to the screen.  But, an Apple Watch app could do the same thing by continuously monitoring your heartbeat -- and notifying you, your family, your physician if there's a problem.

    AI could help everyone to stay alive.

    ration al
  • Reply 30 of 54

    cnocbui said:

    bluefire1 said:
    Thanks Tim for pursuing these core technologies, but could you first significantly increase the battery life of the iPhone?

     

    Sorry, but no we won't be doing that.  We ensure that all our devices have just enough battery life on the day you buy them.  That way, in a years time they won't, because of the way Li-ion batteries start degrading the minute they are manufactured.  So, at around three years - remember we told you that's all the life you could expect - your device will have half the battery life it did when new and you will find it intollerable, which should be really good incentive for you to buy another from us.  A lot of people think we are obsessed with thinness, that's OK, we don't mind that, but really, with all the technological advancements from our suppliers, if we kept our products the same thickness, we would have to fill them up with battery, then the device would last a lot longer than 'enough' on the day you bought it, so in three years, you might still find it useful.  I'm sure you can see why that isn't in anyone's interest.
    I have 2 2007 original iPhone 8K -- both still work.

    If battery is your thing, it's easy enough to get a Quasimodo-case for the iPhone -- trading thinness for more battery ... different strokes!

    ration al
  • Reply 31 of 54
    wizard69 said:
    If Siri is any examsle Apple has a very very long ways to go with AI technology.  Right now Siri appears to be a sock puppet. 
    I never really understand these kind of comments as Siri works great for me.  In general I use it to send texts, read texts, for unit/currency conversion, quick math, calling contacts and non-contacts (such as "Hey Siri, call The Summer House", a local ice cream shop), to turn on/off/dim the lights or the stereo (HomeKit), to get directions, to play/change music, etc.  I do several of these things multiple times a day and very rarely have issues.  The biggest issues for me are when I'm trying to initiate a command over Bluetooth in my car where Siri has more trouble understanding me and it has a slower response time (to start).  Also, I use Siri on my Apple Watch and my iPhone and for both have very few trouble spots (but more on the Watch).

    What makes you say Siri appears to be a sock puppet?  This is a genuine question because my experience is largely different from that.
    I have used Siri exclusively for the past  couple months with a completely shattered phone screen. The only difference between the screen off and on is a slight blur that occasionally lets me see how much signal I have. Everyone I see asks me why I haven't upgraded or replaced the screen yet and honestly I don't really mind it. Sure it is a pain in the butt with emails but I have my laptop and iPad for those. My only complaint is that Siri sucks for replying to group chats which I am in multiple of but other then that I really can't complain. 

    Don't get me wrong I will be first inline for whatever the next release is but until then I will happily use Siri without problems other then the group chat issues until the next iPhone is released. 
  • Reply 32 of 54
    I've been trying to find a use for Siri. I've found it problematic to use for texts (at least from the lock screen) and my searches have generally not exactly been for what I'm actually searching for, such as "Albert Pool Holes."

    I resort to opening Safari and using the dictation feature. It's far more reliable.
    roger wade
  • Reply 33 of 54
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    cnocbui said:

    bluefire1 said:
    Thanks Tim for pursuing these core technologies, but could you first significantly increase the battery life of the iPhone?
    Sorry, but no we won't be doing that.  We ensure that all our devices have just enough battery life on the day you buy them.  That way, in a years time they won't, because of the way Li-ion batteries start degrading the minute they are manufactured.  So, at around three years - remember we told you that's all the life you could expect - your device will have half the battery life it did when new and you will find it intollerable, which should be really good incentive for you to buy another from us.  A lot of people think we are obsessed with thinness, that's OK, we don't mind that, but really, with all the technological advancements from our suppliers, if we kept our products the same thickness, we would have to fill them up with battery, then the device would last a lot longer than 'enough' on the day you bought it, so in three years, you might still find it useful.  I'm sure you can see why that isn't in anyone's interest.
    get a clue man -- it's already been shown time and time again that iDevices have the longest useful lives of any. people keep them longer, then give them to friends & family. so your little troll fantasy is as pathetic as it is untrue. 

    and its stupid, besides. if and when Apple can sell a device that changes battery chemistry and can last much longer than the core technology today, of course they'd sell it. why would they want to leave it a competitor to sell? that's just idiotic to think they wouldn't. 
    edited August 2016 pscooter63ericthehalfbeemike1king editor the grateration al
  • Reply 34 of 54

    I admit that I'm on the loser & loner side of things.  I'm not married, not in a relationship, not dating, I have a full time job that pays well, and an apartment.  I don't use Siri at all as I've not found a single use for it.  I can see how people "with lives" could benefit from AI, but I don't see it helping me any more than Siri currently helps me.  I suspect there are plenty of people just like me out there.  It seems to me that AI would only be successful if it helps everyone, not just those fortunate enough to, "have a life".
    Have you seen the film Her? There's plenty Siri could eventually do for someone home alone.
    fastasleep
  • Reply 35 of 54
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,934member
    wizard69 said:
    If Siri is any examsle Apple has a very very long ways to go with AI technology.  Right now Siri appears to be a sock puppet.  macxpress said:
    I have a feeling they're kinda doing something big! The same thing happened when the iPhone was being developed. Nothing really came out new because everyone was working on the iPhone. Perhaps the same is true here...

    I believe were going beyond Siri at this point. Why would Apple not release anything just to work on Siri? This comment doesn't make any sense at all and was just to bitch about your experience with Siri. Apple wouldn't pull resources from both their hardware and software teams to continue developing Siri.
  • Reply 36 of 54
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,934member
    shev said:
    Yeah good luck with that, you actually need powerful computers for all this fancy future tech and I don't see any running osx anywhere
    Apple can only do what Intel has to offer and quite frankly, there really isn't much out there today thats significantly more powerful than what Apple is currently using. The main focus now is on power consumption, not necessarily processing power.
  • Reply 37 of 54
    Apple is stepping towards that goal with gradual improvements in Siri, such as third-party developer support. 
    How about some decent first-party support from Apple?
  • Reply 38 of 54
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    cnocbui said:

    Sorry, but no we won't be doing that.  We ensure that all our devices have just enough battery life on the day you buy them.  That way, in a years time they won't, because of the way Li-ion batteries start degrading the minute they are manufactured.  So, at around three years - remember we told you that's all the life you could expect - your device will have half the battery life it did when new and you will find it intollerable, which should be really good incentive for you to buy another from us.  A lot of people think we are obsessed with thinness, that's OK, we don't mind that, but really, with all the technological advancements from our suppliers, if we kept our products the same thickness, we would have to fill them up with battery, then the device would last a lot longer than 'enough' on the day you bought it, so in three years, you might still find it useful.  I'm sure you can see why that isn't in anyone's interest.
    get a clue man -- it's already been shown time and time again that iDevices have the longest useful lives of any. people keep them longer, then give them to friends & family. so your little troll fantasy is as pathetic as it is untrue. 

    and its stupid, besides. if and when Apple can sell a device that changes battery chemistry and can last much longer than the core technology today, of course they'd sell it. why would they want to leave it a competitor to sell? that's just idiotic to press they wouldn't. 
    I bought my daughter a SH iPhone 5 two years ago.  The battery was good for one hour of doing nothing, when full charged when it arrived.  No wonder the previous owner got rid of it.

    My 2012 MBPR tells me the battery needs replacing.  I just got off the phone to Apple's authorised repairer for a quote - €663  ($740).  Fuck that and Apple too.  While I really like OSX, It is not worth it at those sorts of prices.

    Keep blowing your fanboy trumpet, I'm sure someone appreciates the noise you make.
    roger wade
  • Reply 39 of 54
    cnocbui said:
    I bought my daughter a SH iPhone 5 two years ago.  The battery was good for one hour of doing nothing, when full charged when it arrived.  No wonder the previous owner got rid of it

    My 2012 MBPR tells me the battery needs replacing.  I just got off the phone to Apple's authorised repairer for a quote - €663  ($740).  Fuck that and Apple too.  While I really like OSX, It is not worth it at those sorts of prices.
    The iPhone 5 battery had a replacement program due to Apple getting a bad batch of batteries.  That isn't news and it's likely you purchased a second hand iPhone 5 that qualified for the replacement.  I don't know if that replacement program is still running considering the age of iPhone 5 at this point.

    As far as your Retina battery, seems like you're getting ripped off by the 3rd party repair place.  My local Apple Store tells me that a battery replacement on a 2012 MacBook Pro Retina is $199.  Perhaps you should look into other options.

    As an aside, I'm still using my iPhone 4 that was purchased on June 24, 2010 and I usually get between 7 and 8 hours of usage out of a charge.
    ericthehalfbeeroger wadenolamacguy
  • Reply 40 of 54
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    cnocbui said:
    I bought my daughter a SH iPhone 5 two years ago.  The battery was good for one hour of doing nothing, when full charged when it arrived.  No wonder the previous owner got rid of it

    My 2012 MBPR tells me the battery needs replacing.  I just got off the phone to Apple's authorised repairer for a quote - €663  ($740).  Fuck that and Apple too.  While I really like OSX, It is not worth it at those sorts of prices.
    The iPhone 5 battery had a replacement program due to Apple getting a bad batch of batteries.  That isn't news and it's likely you purchased a second hand iPhone 5 that qualified for the replacement.  I don't know if that replacement program is still running considering the age of iPhone 5 at this point.

    As far as your Retina battery, seems like you're getting ripped off by the 3rd party repair place.  My local Apple Store tells me that a battery replacement on a 2012 MacBook Pro Retina is $199.  Perhaps you should look into other options.

    As an aside, I'm still using my iPhone 4 that was purchased on June 24, 2010 and I usually get between 7 and 8 hours of usage out of a charge.
    The battery in the iP5 did qualify for the replacement program, but that wasn't announced until after I had replaced the battery myself.

    No, that is Apple's official price and I got the quote from their official repair agent in Ireland, Compu B.  Once again, there is an immense disparity between the quality and character of Apple's customer service in the US and outside of the US.  When I used Apple's website to try an find the cost of the battery replacement, I couldn't find it.  The only avenue I could find  was to pay them €27 for a chat.  I feel sorry for Irish customers seeking service who fall for that one.

    Obviously I shall have to look into getting the part from the US or somewhere else, but it is going to be a hassle I shouldn't have to be put to.  That is problematic because the keyboards are likely different.

    As an aside, I am still using my Samsung Wave purchased in 2010, I charge it once a week, on average.
    edited August 2016
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