Quicken releases 2017 updates for Mac & iOS personal finance apps

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 58
    My Quicken file goes back to .... well, I stared it when I got my Proforma 6116. Once in a while it's nice to go back a decade or so and view a transaction. But, make no mistake, Quicken for Mac is a shit show. Maybe the Mac is still doesn't have a big enough market share to invest what it takes to make good software. That I get, but the forced upgrades and unstable releases show a egregious disdain for their customers. I'd love to see Apple add a financial app to what used to be called the iLife or iWork suite. 
    DenisemoGeorgeBMac
  • Reply 42 of 58
    DenisemoDenisemo Posts: 4unconfirmed, member
    Thanks for the tip @twhiteford I guess I'm stuck with my PC, my accountant refuses to do anything online. Maybe he's onto something.
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 43 of 58
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,428member
    sflocal said:
    Quickbooks and Quicken are the primary reasons why I still run Windows (as a VM) on my mac.  The Mac-versions of both packages suck - badly.  

    I'm really dismayed as to why they don't make Quicken for Mac and Windows interoperable.  

    I'd love to go to a different, more modern package that doesn't cost an arm and a leg and has decent cloud accessibility as well.
    It always amazed me the boss of Inuit sat on Apple's Board but never supported Apple with his software fully.
  • Reply 44 of 58
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,428member

    Quicken is no longer owned by Intuit. You might have switched, but there are still some of us that still use the product and are hopeful for the future.
    I missed that news!  I better Google that as you didn't say who now owns it.  OK here is link: http://www.computerworld.com/article/3041032/desktop-apps/intuit-sells-quicken-to-private-equity-firm-in-management-buyout.html
    edited October 2016
  • Reply 45 of 58
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,729member
    robbyx said:
    If your bank offers online access to your account (pretty much every bank), your financial information is already online, even if you haven't set up online access.  You still have an account there and the bank still lets people access accounts via the internet.  Now, do you give Quicken, QuickBooks, Mint, or some other app or service access to that information?  That's a fair question and you might want to consider the security issues around allowing third party access to your financial data, but make no mistake, your accounts are already online and already hackable.
    So, are you suggesting that since you can access your financial info online from the fiancial institution, that you should no longer worry about security and trying to protect your IDs & passwords and access to your accounts?

    That sounds more like an excuse for exposing your personal stuff to hackers than actual logic.

  • Reply 46 of 58
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,729member
    robbyx said:

    If your bank offers online access to your account (pretty much every bank), your financial information is already online, even if you haven't set up online access.  You still have an account there and the bank still lets people access accounts via the internet.  Now, do you give Quicken, QuickBooks, Mint, or some other app or service access to that information?  That's a fair question and you might want to consider the security issues around allowing third party access to your financial data, but make no mistake, your accounts are already online and already hackable.
    Yes, they are online and they are hackable.
    But providing third party access to your accounts doesn't just double the risk, it probably quintuples the risk -- particularly if it is from a third party with such a poor technical track record as Quicken.   Their programmers haven't made any substantial improvements in that product in the past 10 or 20 years.  What makes you think they are up to speed on security?   And, if they are hacked and your money taken from your bank or investment account, what makes you think you would get anymore than an apology from Quicken?
  • Reply 47 of 58
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,729member
    robbyx said:



    Your accounts are already online, via your bank.  Your financial data is already on someone else's server (the bank).  Intuit has been doing financial software for years, decades.  It's the only thing they do.  Banks use their technology to exchange information.  I'd be much more concerned about someone hacking another web site or service, discovering your username and password, then logging into your bank because you used the same password.  That's much more likely to happen than someone successfully hacking your bank or QuickBooks Online or Mint or whatever.

    I'm amazed at how many people use the same password for everything and never change it.  If you're diligent about password management and give your bank accounts unique strong passwords, you probably have a better change of getting struck by lightning than having your account hacked.
    Of course you do your best to protect access to your bank & financial accounts using different IDs & passwords.
    But because you have a vulnerability (no matter how slight) in one area is no excuse for opening up vulnerabilities in other areas.   That's just silly.

    And, I disagree with your implication that because Quicken has been doing Quicken for years and its all they do that that makes them as secure (or more) than a bank.  The facts are:
    -- Quicken has a sad record of technical achievement over the past 10 years.  They started strong and are living off of that initial effort.
    -- Quicken has no financial incentive to protect your IDs.   If they get hacked and your money is stolen, they have no liability

    Basically, giving the keys to your accounts to Quicken or any other financial service is not much different than giving them to your dope-addict brother in law:   if your money is stolen it is gone -- the bank has no liability because you did not protect your account.  
    IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO PROTECT YOUR ID AND PASSWORD.   PERIOD.
  • Reply 48 of 58
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,729member
    My Quicken file goes back to .... well, I stared it when I got my Proforma 6116. Once in a while it's nice to go back a decade or so and view a transaction. But, make no mistake, Quicken for Mac is a shit show. Maybe the Mac is still doesn't have a big enough market share to invest what it takes to make good software. That I get, but the forced upgrades and unstable releases show a egregious disdain for their customers. I'd love to see Apple add a financial app to what used to be called the iLife or iWork suite. 
    i second that!
    Any server can be hacked.  But I trust Apple more than most.   Plus, they don't make their money by using or selling your data like others do...
  • Reply 49 of 58
    robbyxrobbyx Posts: 479member
    robbyx said:
    If your bank offers online access to your account (pretty much every bank), your financial information is already online, even if you haven't set up online access.  You still have an account there and the bank still lets people access accounts via the internet.  Now, do you give Quicken, QuickBooks, Mint, or some other app or service access to that information?  That's a fair question and you might want to consider the security issues around allowing third party access to your financial data, but make no mistake, your accounts are already online and already hackable.
    So, are you suggesting that since you can access your financial info online from the fiancial institution, that you should no longer worry about security and trying to protect your IDs & passwords and access to your accounts?

    That sounds more like an excuse for exposing your personal stuff to hackers than actual logic.

    Did you even read what I wrote?

    "Now, do you give Quicken, QuickBooks, Mint, or some other app or service access to that information?  That's a fair question and you might want to consider the security issues around allowing third party access to your financial data, but make no mistake, your accounts are already online and already hackable."

    I simply said that your bank is already online.  Your data is already online.  Therefore it is already hackable whether you use Quicken to download data or not.

    I then said it's fair to consider the security ramifications of allowing a third party to access this information.  Nowhere did I suggest that one should "no longer worry about security."

    Can you not read?
  • Reply 50 of 58
    robbyxrobbyx Posts: 479member

    robbyx said:



    Your accounts are already online, via your bank.  Your financial data is already on someone else's server (the bank).  Intuit has been doing financial software for years, decades.  It's the only thing they do.  Banks use their technology to exchange information.  I'd be much more concerned about someone hacking another web site or service, discovering your username and password, then logging into your bank because you used the same password.  That's much more likely to happen than someone successfully hacking your bank or QuickBooks Online or Mint or whatever.

    I'm amazed at how many people use the same password for everything and never change it.  If you're diligent about password management and give your bank accounts unique strong passwords, you probably have a better change of getting struck by lightning than having your account hacked.
    Of course you do your best to protect access to your bank & financial accounts using different IDs & passwords.
    But because you have a vulnerability (no matter how slight) in one area is no excuse for opening up vulnerabilities in other areas.   That's just silly.

    And, I disagree with your implication that because Quicken has been doing Quicken for years and its all they do that that makes them as secure (or more) than a bank.  The facts are:
    -- Quicken has a sad record of technical achievement over the past 10 years.  They started strong and are living off of that initial effort.
    -- Quicken has no financial incentive to protect your IDs.   If they get hacked and your money is stolen, they have no liability

    Basically, giving the keys to your accounts to Quicken or any other financial service is not much different than giving them to your dope-addict brother in law:   if your money is stolen it is gone -- the bank has no liability because you did not protect your account.  
    IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO PROTECT YOUR ID AND PASSWORD.   PERIOD.

    Banks have been relying on Intuit technology for decades to exchange information.  Intuit is WAY bigger than Quicken.  Your comment about a "sad record of technical achievement" is just not remotely accurate.  Yes, their consumer facing products, especially the Mac version of Quicken, aren't great.  But that doesn't really speak to the quality of their backend security for online/cloud services.  Of course Quicken is now owned by someone else, so who knows where things go from here.  That said, Quicken (or any other company, for that matter) has no financial incentive to protect your data?  Really?  That's absurd.  They are a for-profit business.  They won't be in business and everyone will lose his or her job if they don't take security seriously.  That's pretty darn obvious.

    Every single day you get in your car or take the subway or whatever to work.  Do you freak out about that too?  The chances of getting hacked are minimal compared to the chances of sustaining bodily injury every time you take a drive.  Put things in perspective.  There is so much paranoia around hackers with so little evidence of anything bad happening.  Sure, Dateline can always dredge up a good scary identity theft story every season.  And it would SUCK to be that person.  But when you consider that billions upon billions of banking transactions happen every day and hundreds of millions of people use online banking services, and the sky remains firmly above our heads, the paranoia seems a little ridiculous to me.  Take security seriously.  Don't use online services if you don't want to.  But don't expect others to embrace a paranoid hacker fantasy view of the world because it simply isn't supported by the evidence.
    edited October 2016
  • Reply 51 of 58
    DenisemoDenisemo Posts: 4unconfirmed, member
    All I can say is that I'm glad I happened upon this blog/thread, because it caused me to GO CHANGE EVERY PASSWORD to all different ones. <WIN-WIN> :)
    ...Hey have any of you come across one of those random password generator/password manager programs (software or apps?) I downloaded a free one a few months ago, but it was pretty rough and had very many passwords with repeating characters (which is a no-no for many password protocols or whatever you call it), so I couldn't use it. Can anybody recommend a good one, or is it better to not use something like that? Thanks guys!

  • Reply 52 of 58
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,729member
    robbyx said:
    robbyx said:
    If your bank offers online access to your account (pretty much every bank), your financial information is already online, even if you haven't set up online access.  You still have an account there and the bank still lets people access accounts via the internet.  Now, do you give Quicken, QuickBooks, Mint, or some other app or service access to that information?  That's a fair question and you might want to consider the security issues around allowing third party access to your financial data, but make no mistake, your accounts are already online and already hackable.
    So, are you suggesting that since you can access your financial info online from the fiancial institution, that you should no longer worry about security and trying to protect your IDs & passwords and access to your accounts?

    That sounds more like an excuse for exposing your personal stuff to hackers than actual logic.

    Did you even read what I wrote?

    "Now, do you give Quicken, QuickBooks, Mint, or some other app or service access to that information?  That's a fair question and you might want to consider the security issues around allowing third party access to your financial data, but make no mistake, your accounts are already online and already hackable."

    I simply said that your bank is already online.  Your data is already online.  Therefore it is already hackable whether you use Quicken to download data or not.

    I then said it's fair to consider the security ramifications of allowing a third party to access this information.  Nowhere did I suggest that one should "no longer worry about security."

    Can you not read?
    I did read.  And what I read is you minimizing the obvious risk of providing direct access to your financial information and accounts via a third party's cloud based server and thereby increasing the chances of your accounts to and information being stolen or misused by (I believe) at least 5 fold.

  • Reply 53 of 58
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,729member
    robbyx said:



    Banks have been relying on Intuit technology for decades to exchange information.  Intuit is WAY bigger than Quicken.  Your comment about a "sad record of technical achievement" is just not remotely accurate.  Yes, their consumer facing products, especially the Mac version of Quicken, aren't great.  But that doesn't really speak to the quality of their backend security for online/cloud services.  Of course Quicken is now owned by someone else, so who knows where things go from here.  That said, Quicken (or any other company, for that matter) has no financial incentive to protect your data?  Really?  That's absurd.  They are a for-profit business.  They won't be in business and everyone will lose his or her job if they don't take security seriously.  That's pretty darn obvious.

    Every single day you get in your car or take the subway or whatever to work.  Do you freak out about that too?  The chances of getting hacked are minimal compared to the chances of sustaining bodily injury every time you take a drive.  Put things in perspective.  There is so much paranoia around hackers with so little evidence of anything bad happening.  Sure, Dateline can always dredge up a good scary identity theft story every season.  And it would SUCK to be that person.  But when you consider that billions upon billions of banking transactions happen every day and hundreds of millions of people use online banking services, and the sky remains firmly above our heads, the paranoia seems a little ridiculous to me.  Take security seriously.  Don't use online services if you don't want to.  But don't expect others to embrace a paranoid hacker fantasy view of the world because it simply isn't supported by the evidence.
    No, I stand by what I wrote based on 20 years experience with the Quicken product.   For the last 10 of those years, Quicken has simply been milking a quality product dry by selling virtually the same product over and over again with little or no investment into newer technology (except offering a cloud based version).  Essentially they believed (correctly) that they had no meaningful competition, so they stopped investing in their own product.   So, Quicken is standing pat with 10-20 years old technology while hackers have been increasing and modernizing their techniques on a monthly basis.  And, their poor regard and attitude towards their customer's was well illustrated by the cavalier attitude that their sister product TurboTax took towards their long time customers.

    So, if I had to bet on the hackers or Quicken, I would bet on the hackers.

    Further, when you say that Quicken has a financial interest in protecting your data and accounts is misled.   They have no more interest than any of the countless third parties whose customer's data has already been stolen.  How many of them have gone out of business?  I don't know of a single one.

    And, your equating worrying about being hacked to a subway accident is simply a false analogy.

    Sorry, but Identity Theft is the largest growing crime in the world.  Ignore it at your own peril.   I prefer to minimize my risk by exposing my data and my accounts as little as possible.  
  • Reply 54 of 58
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 5,022member
    robbyx said:
    maestro64 said:
    paxman said:
    sog35 said:
    Quicken sucks

    Intuit especially sucks.

    Quickbooks 2014 on Mac is not supported on Mac Sierra. That is FLATOUT ridiculous. How the hell can you support software for only TWO YEARS. 

    They are so greedy. They want people to switch to Quickbooks online which cost 3x more in the long run

    Greedy software companies with their subscriptions piss me off
    All accounting softwares are going towards online only. I am considering Quicken Online for my company and I like it. Not crazy about the price but to be honest it is competitive. Online has advantages for the end user such as access, saying up to date, cross platform. For the providers the advantage is obvious - predictable cashflow. There is an accounting package that is cross platform called Moneyworks. Supposedly very good though I don't think they do an IOS version. They too have an online version and my bet is that in a few years that is all there will be.
    Why would you put your financial information online, you know hackers are pretty smart people and they know how to get into systems and get what they want. The guy breaking into your home and steals your computer is not so bright and would not know how to get your financial information if you protect it correctly.
    If your bank offers online access to your account (pretty much every bank), your financial information is already online, even if you haven't set up online access.  You still have an account there and the bank still lets people access accounts via the internet.  Now, do you give Quicken, QuickBooks, Mint, or some other app or service access to that information?  That's a fair question and you might want to consider the security issues around allowing third party access to your financial data, but make no mistake, your accounts are already online and already hackable.

    True, but no banks have been hacked recently, why they have some of the best security in the market they been secure for a long time they have to be. Banks do not mess around, even when internal people found ways to round fractions of pennies off people's accounts and move them to other accounts they took this stuff seriously. Also, even if someone did manage to get into one of my accounts its is only one, not all the accounts. Put all your accounts on Quicken website gives a hacker access to it all. Trust me I am not naïve, I had someone try hacking my bank account but the bank lock them and me out after two fail attempts, my bank would call me let me know. They said they saw the attempts and they came from an off short IP address and block them and told me they had user id but not the pass word and was doing a brute force attached. They immediately change my UID and PW. I personally was impress with this level of protection that were taking.
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 55 of 58
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,729member
    maestro64 said:
    If your bank offers online access to your account (pretty much every bank), your financial information is already online, even if you haven't set up online access.  You still have an account there and the bank still lets people access accounts via the internet.  Now, do you give Quicken, QuickBooks, Mint, or some other app or service access to that information?  That's a fair question and you might want to consider the security issues around allowing third party access to your financial data, but make no mistake, your accounts are already online and already hackable.

    True, but no banks have been hacked recently, why they have some of the best security in the market they been secure for a long time they have to be. Banks do not mess around, even when internal people found ways to round fractions of pennies off people's accounts and move them to other accounts they took this stuff seriously. Also, even if someone did manage to get into one of my accounts its is only one, not all the accounts. Put all your accounts on Quicken website gives a hacker access to it all. Trust me I am not naïve, I had someone try hacking my bank account but the bank lock them and me out after two fail attempts, my bank would call me let me know. They said they saw the attempts and they came from an off short IP address and block them and told me they had user id but not the pass word and was doing a brute force attached. They immediately change my UID and PW. I personally was impress with this level of protection that were taking.
    Well said....
    ... I feel sorry for those who take the Elfred E Neuman philosophy:   "What?   Me Worry?"
  • Reply 56 of 58
    sog35 said:
    Sorry, but Quicken lost me as a long time customer several years ago when they lost interest in their Mac financial apps and went all-in on their quick loan business. Switched to iBank (now Banktivity) and never looked back. Enjoy your payday loan hucksterism, Quicken. Rot in hell. 
    Does this app do bank reconciliations and credit card reconcilations?

    Are there some type of financial statement reports - show assets/liabilites and expenses and income?

    I see this app cost $59. But is that for 1 year? Or can i keep it for multiple years?

    I've been using Banktivity since it was iBank 3. One of things I really like about the company is the no sunset policy. You can stick with the version you buy for as long as you want. They have good support as well. I also like the fact that with each release, the product has been improving with new features, unlike my experience with Quicken where things seemed to be slowly stripped away. For example the mobile app for iPhones used to be pretty useless on it's own, super basic with a very clunky sync that relied on the mac version. But in the last couple of years it's become nearly full feature in comparison to the Mac version, with a super easy cloud sync. Id say give it a try to any of my friends. They offer a 30 day free trial to boot. www.iggsoftware.com
  • Reply 57 of 58
    maestro64 said:

    There is a flaw in Chase's QIF format which they know about but refuses to fix and requires a manual step to fix the file to allow it to import properly.


    There are several threads on the Internet about the problem with Chase.com credit card activity downloads in the QIF format. I suspect that for every Chase customer who complains on the Internet about it, there are many others, perhaps thousands, that also have the problem.

    Continue reading at https://sleibowitz.neocities.org/ChaseQIF.html

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