Teardown destroys Apple's irreparable AirPods, revealing tiny circuitry held together by g...

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 39
    sog35 said:
    These are not meant to be fixed by consumers.

    Agreed. Although my biggest concern is after having picked up a pair yesterday (they are pretty amazing) is how to get them professionally painted black and still have them working perfectly. 

    I seriously can't stand the white q-tip look they remind people of. 

    Black is the way to go but a google search only seems to turn up the fake mock ups. 


    Anyone know if anyone is doing custom painting on these? 

  • Reply 22 of 39
    I think it is absurd to even imagine these EarPods as repairable by anyone.  Whenever you have such a miniature housing containing so much function it is going to be automatically un-repairable.  It's not like they are super expensive.  Imagine, for example, a set of hearing aids that cost thousands--and they are not very repairable either!
    ration alwatto_cobra
  • Reply 23 of 39
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 6,519member
    If the toaster cost 40€ that would be understandable from the start. These cost 179€ but with a two warranty it is not so much of a problem.

    For me the issue of the battery is more worrying. When it dies, your (possibly perfect) Pod will die with it.

    They will be exposed to potentially more temperature changes and I suppose they don't need to be calibrated. I wonder how that will workout in the real-world given their small size.


  • Reply 24 of 39
    sog35 said:
    These are not meant to be fixed by consumers.
    And it sounds like neither Apple Stores nor Apple-authorized third party repair sites will be able to either. $160 throw-away pieces of electronics. 

    So are we to assume the batteries aren't designed to be replaced? Apple just swaps out the AirPods for new ones when the batteries go TU (and charges you $69 each if out of warranty)? 
  • Reply 25 of 39
    macxpress said:
    macgui said:
    macxpress said:

    they now have a failing business model. 
    That's utter bullshit. Repairing AirPods would be a failing proposition. A lot of people aren't happy with Apple's low repairability record. To be clear, 'repairability' is not about the consumer, and hasn't been for years. 

    It's disappointing for many of use that Apple has reduced the user upgrade experience to near zero. And now, a failed component will more often than not mean Apple replacing the entire mobo instead of the bad component(s).

    But that it means Apple has a failing business model is just not true. 
    Show me where people are not happy with Apple's low repairability record...Its quite obvious iFixit has a failing business model right now...otherwise they wouldn't be complaining every time they tear an Apple product down. 
    There's a misunderstanding here -- Macgui thought you meant Apple had a failing business model. So did I. But it's clear now you meant iFixIt.
  • Reply 26 of 39
    I'm curious if anyone is disappointed that the AirPods don't have removable batteries  B)
    lukei
  • Reply 27 of 39
    jbdragonjbdragon Posts: 2,246member
    avon b7 said:
    I don't see really what makes them difficult to recycle. I think that with the right tools it won't be that much of an issue. The non repairable/replaceable batteries in the Pods is the big downer for me.
    What? I've owned many Bluetooth headphones over the years and not a single one of them had replaceable battery's. Why would these be any different? On the other hand you're buying Macbooks that don't have Replaceable battery's.
  • Reply 28 of 39
    Do they still make toasters?
    lukei
  • Reply 29 of 39
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,957member
    What has everyone got against glue? I love glue.

    I had spinal surgery and they sealed me up with glue. Much better than tiny crosshead screws.


    pscooter631st
  • Reply 30 of 39
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,957member
    michael_c said:
    macxpress said:
    While its interesting to see what's inside and how its assembled, why do they have to complain about the repairability of every product? 99.9% of users are not going to try and repair these. When they break you either get them replaced under warranty or they're simply broken.
    I read this article a bit differently - unless I missed it, I don't see a complaint, but rather a statement of fact.  The AirPods are not repairable any more than light bulbs or a myriad of other consumer products.  I'm sure Apple could have made them repairable, but would have sacrificed reliability, performance, and compactness.  Looks like a good design decision by Apple to give functionality, reliability and compactness higher import.  Especially, as others have said, repair costs on such a low price point item would not be something customers could justify.
    Something that tiny is never going to be economical to repair.
  • Reply 31 of 39
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member
    sog35 said:
    These are not meant to be fixed by consumers.

    Agreed. Although my biggest concern is after having picked up a pair yesterday (they are pretty amazing) is how to get them professionally painted black and still have them working perfectly. 

    I seriously can't stand the white q-tip look they remind people of. 

    Black is the way to go but a google search only seems to turn up the fake mock ups. 


    Anyone know if anyone is doing custom painting on these? 

    Once you know what plastic they use, finding how to paint them shouldn't be too hard (using the kind of paint used for models)
    The hardest part is probably getting the first coat to stick and maybe taping the places you don't want to paint, probably would need some light sanding.
    If you can find out the type of plastic used, you could even test on a piece :-) first.

    Making it sure to seal the paint with a finish that withstand the chemicals in sweat is probably the most important (or you'll get some discolorations pretty quick).

    I'm a DIY person, but I understand most people don't want to experiment with their new toys :-).




    Solipscooter63
  • Reply 32 of 39
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member
    jbdragon said:
    avon b7 said:
    I don't see really what makes them difficult to recycle. I think that with the right tools it won't be that much of an issue. The non repairable/replaceable batteries in the Pods is the big downer for me.
    What? I've owned many Bluetooth headphones over the years and not a single one of them had replaceable battery's. Why would these be any different? On the other hand you're buying Macbooks that don't have Replaceable battery's.
    Making things replaceable always reduce reliability (increases complexity and increase number of failure points) and increase size.

    The same reason the Iphone doesn't have a replaceable battery (and people have moaned about that for 9 years...)

    ration al
  • Reply 33 of 39
    brucemcbrucemc Posts: 1,541member
    cropr said:
    macxpress said:
    While its interesting to see what's inside and how its assembled, why do they have to complain about the repairability of every product? 99.9% of users are not going to try and repair these. When they break you either get them replaced under warranty or they're simply broken.
    From the environmental point of view, it is better that equipment can be repaired, that batteries can be recuperated and recycled, ....  This is especially true for the charging case,which has a bigger battery and where the design constraints of size, weight, and materials are less important than for the earpods.
    Apple will recycle all of their products at no charge.

    What company in the entire electronics industry globally has better environmental credentials than Apple?
    ration al
  • Reply 34 of 39
    sandorsandor Posts: 650member
    metrix said:
    I am guessing in the mfg. world they called it epoxy not glue.

    epoxy hardens, i'm figuring they probably use a non-hardening adhesive for a more resilient (flexible bonds) device?
  • Reply 35 of 39
    After decades of working with engineers and inventors on design and engineering, i still have not lost the fascination and admiration I experience when seeing the innards of a product like the Airpod. 

    As relates to disposal/recycle and the environment.
    it will be a brave new world, when industry fully embraces the concept of recycling landfills for the gases and solids available within. Such mining will eventually sustain a nice percentage of raw resources,  material and energy. A clear need now, is to a protect the groundwater resources below the landfills and continue to increase capture and reuse of  the energy offgassing. Saving and re mediating the water and off gas issues in the short term are critical. 
  • Reply 36 of 39
    foggyhill said:
    sog35 said:
    These are not meant to be fixed by consumers.

    Agreed. Although my biggest concern is after having picked up a pair yesterday (they are pretty amazing) is how to get them professionally painted black and still have them working perfectly. 

    I seriously can't stand the white q-tip look they remind people of. 

    Black is the way to go but a google search only seems to turn up the fake mock ups. 


    Anyone know if anyone is doing custom painting on these? 

    Once you know what plastic they use, finding how to paint them shouldn't be too hard (using the kind of paint used for models)
    The hardest part is probably getting the first coat to stick and maybe taping the places you don't want to paint, probably would need some light sanding.
    If you can find out the type of plastic used, you could even test on a piece :-) first.

    Making it sure to seal the paint with a finish that withstand the chemicals in sweat is probably the most important (or you'll get some discolorations pretty quick).

    I'm a DIY person, but I understand most people don't want to experiment with their new toys :-).




    Thanks for the tips. Appreciate it.  

    I usually am a DIY Guy too, but when comes to these and this process, it sounds like it may be a bit to risky to attempt for a novice painter like myself. 

    Taping and sanding I can probably handle. The proper priming/painting  and sealing would be areas of concern. 

    Trying to find some one local in LA who wild do it and guarantee their work. 


  • Reply 37 of 39
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 6,519member
    jbdragon said:
    avon b7 said:
    I don't see really what makes them difficult to recycle. I think that with the right tools it won't be that much of an issue. The non repairable/replaceable batteries in the Pods is the big downer for me.
    What? I've owned many Bluetooth headphones over the years and not a single one of them had replaceable battery's. Why would these be any different? On the other hand you're buying Macbooks that don't have Replaceable battery's.
    Just out of interest. How much did your Bluetooth headphones cost and what size was the battery?

    I've just ordered some higher end Bluetooth noise cancellation headphones and my plan A manufacturer lost the sale because the plan B manufacturer has replaceable batteries.

    On a  nearly 400€ product I didn't want to take any risks. I haven't been too lucky with batteries over the years.
  • Reply 38 of 39
    g-newsg-news Posts: 1,107member

    Repairability 0/10 and not recycleable, but "We give more than we take, from the planet" or whatever they said in their one-Pager mumbo jumbo Xmas present.

    Sad.

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