Apple's Macs and iPads fall to third place in US classroom use

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 83
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,782member
    aawordy said:
    The article states: "Versus 2015, iPads fell a percentage point to just 5 percent of devices in the American K-12 segment, while Macs shrank five points to 14 percent, Futuresource Consulting said on Thursday. "

    However, the graph does not match that info. Which is correct? The graph or the the text. Please update. 
    Good catch. They mixed up the Macs and iPads.
  • Reply 22 of 83
    entropysentropys Posts: 1,646member
    Much of what has been mentioned in previous comments is true. But more central to the question is that stubborn 2/5's in society who for whatever reason, have a political/moral/aping negative attitude against Apple and the supposed 'progressive' agenda.
    The reason this is exceptionally relevant in this discussion is because, those good meaning souls have decisively wedged their way into majority voting positions in school administrations and school boards throughout America.
    the best interest of the children, education, long term use/value, tech etc., goes by the wayside.
    Apple is an easy target!
    Yeah and that 2/5's are the IT department who have spent a lifetime hating smug Apple users.

    However, bottom line is all Apple products are getting priced out of the the education market. Simple as.
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 23 of 83
    qwweraqwwera Posts: 266member
    qwwera said:
    There is no need for schools as underfunded as they are to use Apple products. Much too expensive for a product that is moving at such a quick pace. And much too expensive in how brutal a classroom will be towards them. And no way for a overtaxed teacher to fiddle with since there is no way to easily configure a classroom of iOS devices remotely. 

    Ios as it is today is not classroom friendly on the OS side or the cost side. 
    This coming from an education side and with friends on the inside as well. Chrome books are the best solution for that classroom. This is an unbiased response. Just the sobering truth.
    I think your last sentence misspells "just an uninformed opinion". No offense, but do you even know what you're talking about? Apple has a leasing program that allows you to maintain the latest hardware and then they have a partner buy back the hardware at the end of the lease, which makes them cost less than the up front price. So, you can keep up with technology pretty easily.
    Uninformed is YOU. What experience in education do you have? Probably none.
    do you have a masters in educational technology like I do? 

    If if you don't want to make a fool of yourself, I suggest you quit talking out of your ass
  • Reply 24 of 83
    macplusplusmacplusplus Posts: 1,628member
    AI_lias said:
    Apple priced itself right out of that market, and also other markets. It's all a matter of balance. If they go for profits, they'll make those profits, at the expense of some mind share from people who cannot afford Apple stuff. Even for me, I am watching carefully for deals of refurbished or used Apple equipment, I can't just afford to buy new devices from them, especially now that you cannot upgrade them. In my opinion, Apple is making a mistake, just like they are making a mistake for not including a consumer, non-pro 15" laptop. This is not about quality/non-quality and race to the bottom, but about protecting your image and ecosystem itself. Schools are especially important, because loyalty which can be ingrained early. So, yes, price matters, not just quality. Or, quality, yes, but at what price?
    That is an assumption dating from the 90s, before computers begun penetrating homes in the 2000s. Schools are important but homes are absolutely more important and Apple has conquered homes. I have yet to see a kid who will dismiss her/his iPad at home on behalf of the school-provided crappy device.
    edited March 2017
  • Reply 25 of 83
    kamiltonkamilton Posts: 259member
    Much of what has been mentioned in previous comments is true. But more central to the question is that stubborn 2/5's in society who for whatever reason, have a political/moral/aping negative attitude against Apple and the supposed 'progressive' agenda.
    The reason this is exceptionally relevant in this discussion is because, those good meaning souls have decisively wedged their way into majority voting positions in school administrations and school boards throughout America.
    the best interest of the children, education, long term use/value, tech etc., goes by the wayside.
    Apple is an easy target!
    Roger that.  Also, Tech support folks, especially those in their 40s,who often make these purchase decisions, love cheap stuff that brakes.  Job security while making themselves look like successful penny pinchers.  The kids suffer, but who cares? Right?  Apple could easily take share here, but racing to the bottom is really bad business.  
  • Reply 26 of 83
    qwweraqwwera Posts: 266member
    macxpress said:
    qwwera said:
    There is no need for schools as underfunded as they are to use Apple products. Much too expensive for a product that is moving at such a quick pace. And much too expensive in how brutal a classroom will be towards them. And no way for a overtaxed teacher to fiddle with since there is no way to easily configure a classroom of iOS devices remotely. 

    Ios as it is today is not classroom friendly on the OS side or the cost side. 
    This coming from an education side and with friends on the inside as well. Chrome books are the best solution for that classroom. This is an unbiased response. Just the sobering truth.
    With proper management tools, you can configure and manage iOS devices (and Macs) remotely very easily. Its called an MDM (Mobile Device Management) solution. We use Jamf Pro to manage our iPads (and our Macs) and its great. I can have all the management setup before the iPads even get at our door so when we take them out of the box we could literally just hand them out and after connecting them to wifi, they set themselves up automatically along with pushing any necessary apps, web clips, setting up folder layouts, restricting what apps they can use (include the App/iTunes Store), etc, etc. Yes, its a pain in the butt managing them individually, or using Apple Configurator...its very easy to manage them using an MDM and a good MDM. 

    You can also use a management system provided to Google to manage ChromeBooks and you can use SCCM to manage Windows devices. All platforms have a management solution. Some work better than others and some are restricted by what the device can or can't do. 
    I see what you're saying, and if a school could hire a dedicated IT guy for the teachers that would be great. But have you seen how underfunded and overworked teachers are?
    nit only that, you have a huge percentage of teachers who's kids are far more proficient with technology than teachers. 
    Yes this is a temporary thing as a swath of teachers head for retirement, but in the meantime it's pretty dire.

    one thing that's crazy is how much busywork the teachers have leaped upon them because of the lack of incorporation of newish technologies into the classroom, ... not even speaking for the kids, but for the teachers and administrators. It's busywork hell.
    again it's a generational thing that will eventually work its way out, but the sooner the better.
    ireland
  • Reply 27 of 83
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,823member
    qwwera said:
    macxpress said:
    qwwera said:
    There is no need for schools as underfunded as they are to use Apple products. Much too expensive for a product that is moving at such a quick pace. And much too expensive in how brutal a classroom will be towards them. And no way for a overtaxed teacher to fiddle with since there is no way to easily configure a classroom of iOS devices remotely. 

    Ios as it is today is not classroom friendly on the OS side or the cost side. 
    This coming from an education side and with friends on the inside as well. Chrome books are the best solution for that classroom. This is an unbiased response. Just the sobering truth.
    With proper management tools, you can configure and manage iOS devices (and Macs) remotely very easily. Its called an MDM (Mobile Device Management) solution. We use Jamf Pro to manage our iPads (and our Macs) and its great. I can have all the management setup before the iPads even get at our door so when we take them out of the box we could literally just hand them out and after connecting them to wifi, they set themselves up automatically along with pushing any necessary apps, web clips, setting up folder layouts, restricting what apps they can use (include the App/iTunes Store), etc, etc. Yes, its a pain in the butt managing them individually, or using Apple Configurator...its very easy to manage them using an MDM and a good MDM. 

    You can also use a management system provided to Google to manage ChromeBooks and you can use SCCM to manage Windows devices. All platforms have a management solution. Some work better than others and some are restricted by what the device can or can't do. 
    I see what you're saying, and if a school could hire a dedicated IT guy for the teachers that would be great. But have you seen how underfunded and overworked teachers are?
    nit only that, you have a huge percentage of teachers who's kids are far more proficient with technology than teachers. 
    Yes this is a temporary thing as a swath of teachers head for retirement, but in the meantime it's pretty dire.

    one thing that's crazy is how much busywork the teachers have leaped upon them because of the lack of incorporation of newish technologies into the classroom, ... not even speaking for the kids, but for the teachers and administrators. It's busywork hell.
    again it's a generational thing that will eventually work its way out, but the sooner the better.
    What most schools fail to do is provide professional development for staff's technical needs. This happens with all kinds of BYOD and 1-to-1 programs. They slap devices in teachers/students laps and just say well here you...figure it out! This happens with not only iPads, but also ChromeBooks, Windows based laptops, etc. Its really hard and expensive to pull off successfully. You need EVERYONE to work together and have a purpose and goal for this type of program. I guarantee you just about every single time you hear about a BYOD or 1-to-1 initiative failing its because of lack of planning, and professional development. 
    qwwerasupadav03ireland
  • Reply 28 of 83
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 7,297member
    qwwera said:
    qwwera said:
    There is no need for schools as underfunded as they are to use Apple products. Much too expensive for a product that is moving at such a quick pace. And much too expensive in how brutal a classroom will be towards them. And no way for a overtaxed teacher to fiddle with since there is no way to easily configure a classroom of iOS devices remotely. 

    Ios as it is today is not classroom friendly on the OS side or the cost side. 
    This coming from an education side and with friends on the inside as well. Chrome books are the best solution for that classroom. This is an unbiased response. Just the sobering truth.
    I think your last sentence misspells "just an uninformed opinion". No offense, but do you even know what you're talking about? Apple has a leasing program that allows you to maintain the latest hardware and then they have a partner buy back the hardware at the end of the lease, which makes them cost less than the up front price. So, you can keep up with technology pretty easily.
    Uninformed is YOU. What experience in education do you have? Probably none.
    do you have a masters in educational technology like I do? 

    If if you don't want to make a fool of yourself, I suggest you quit talking out of your ass
    Your response is a very low-value post. He supplied info related to his point (leasing program for cost) and as has been posted here it's very easy to use a MDM to manage and configure them remotely. 

    You have countered none of that and just resorted to uncalled for aggression. 

    -1
    ai46pscooter63irelandblah64
  • Reply 29 of 83
    irelandireland Posts: 17,569member
    Offer better iPads at cheaper prices and education use will go up.
  • Reply 30 of 83
    sflocal said:
    Sad, but the reality is that most schools will use what is the cheapest, not the best.  My nephews use Chromebooks in school and it just pains me to see the frustrations in their faces when those cheap pieces of junk act up.  
    It pains me to see in classrooms these stupid apple laptops which are too thin with terrible keyboards.  Why they are obsessed with laptops so thin is beyond me.  As a long time shareholder I think their laptops suck.
  • Reply 31 of 83
    appexappex Posts: 687member
    Apple could reduce price of all devices by 50%, and still make huge profits, besides tremendously boosting market share.
  • Reply 32 of 83
    qwweraqwwera Posts: 266member
    qwwera said:
    qwwera said:
    There is no need for schools as underfunded as they are to use Apple products. Much too expensive for a product that is moving at such a quick pace. And much too expensive in how brutal a classroom will be towards them. And no way for a overtaxed teacher to fiddle with since there is no way to easily configure a classroom of iOS devices remotely. 

    Ios as it is today is not classroom friendly on the OS side or the cost side. 
    This coming from an education side and with friends on the inside as well. Chrome books are the best solution for that classroom. This is an unbiased response. Just the sobering truth.
    I think your last sentence misspells "just an uninformed opinion". No offense, but do you even know what you're talking about? Apple has a leasing program that allows you to maintain the latest hardware and then they have a partner buy back the hardware at the end of the lease, which makes them cost less than the up front price. So, you can keep up with technology pretty easily.
    Uninformed is YOU. What experience in education do you have? Probably none.
    do you have a masters in educational technology like I do? 

    If if you don't want to make a fool of yourself, I suggest you quit talking out of your ass
    Your response is a very low-value post. He supplied info related to his point (leasing program for cost) and as has been posted here it's very easy to use a MDM to manage and configure them remotely. 

    You have countered none of that and just resorted to uncalled for aggression. 

    -1
    That's a lot of bs. His comment was the one that was aggressive. And both of you do not grasp the reality of where the schools are at. As if the the teachers who can barely use an iPhone for personal use have the tools and time and education to fuss with anything they've never heard of.
    Ive educated you and him both.  
    That's as high value as you can get.
    VS you both talking out of your ass who know nothing about the state of educational technology talk like biased fanboys with no basis on reality.
    edited March 2017
  • Reply 33 of 83
    supadav03supadav03 Posts: 443member
    My mother-in-law has been a teacher for over 25 years and she has told me her school is slowly moving away from iPads and Macs. Most of the teachers, including her, are not happy about this. They much preferred to have Macs in the computer lab and in the classroom but budget was a major factor in the switch. If money wasn't a factor they would have never changed. I'd bet this holds true for quite a few other schools as well. As for the iPads, the teachers and kids loved them. The issue (at least at her school) was there were no guides or assistance to show the teachers all the things the could do and what apps were best. The school board really should have put more effort into educating the staff on all the abilities, apps, and functionality the iPads could offer instead of just saying "here's some iPads for you class, do something great with them!" Really is a shame.
  • Reply 34 of 83
    qwweraqwwera Posts: 266member
    macxpress said:
    qwwera said:
    macxpress said:
    qwwera said:
    There is no need for schools as underfunded as they are to use Apple products. Much too expensive for a product that is moving at such a quick pace. And much too expensive in how brutal a classroom will be towards them. And no way for a overtaxed teacher to fiddle with since there is no way to easily configure a classroom of iOS devices remotely. 

    Ios as it is today is not classroom friendly on the OS side or the cost side. 
    This coming from an education side and with friends on the inside as well. Chrome books are the best solution for that classroom. This is an unbiased response. Just the sobering truth.
    With proper management tools, you can configure and manage iOS devices (and Macs) remotely very easily. Its called an MDM (Mobile Device Management) solution. We use Jamf Pro to manage our iPads (and our Macs) and its great. I can have all the management setup before the iPads even get at our door so when we take them out of the box we could literally just hand them out and after connecting them to wifi, they set themselves up automatically along with pushing any necessary apps, web clips, setting up folder layouts, restricting what apps they can use (include the App/iTunes Store), etc, etc. Yes, its a pain in the butt managing them individually, or using Apple Configurator...its very easy to manage them using an MDM and a good MDM. 

    You can also use a management system provided to Google to manage ChromeBooks and you can use SCCM to manage Windows devices. All platforms have a management solution. Some work better than others and some are restricted by what the device can or can't do. 
    I see what you're saying, and if a school could hire a dedicated IT guy for the teachers that would be great. But have you seen how underfunded and overworked teachers are?
    nit only that, you have a huge percentage of teachers who's kids are far more proficient with technology than teachers. 
    Yes this is a temporary thing as a swath of teachers head for retirement, but in the meantime it's pretty dire.

    one thing that's crazy is how much busywork the teachers have leaped upon them because of the lack of incorporation of newish technologies into the classroom, ... not even speaking for the kids, but for the teachers and administrators. It's busywork hell.
    again it's a generational thing that will eventually work its way out, but the sooner the better.
    What most schools fail to do is provide professional development for staff's technical needs. This happens with all kinds of BYOD and 1-to-1 programs. They slap devices in teachers/students laps and just say well here you...figure it out! This happens with not only iPads, but also ChromeBooks, Windows based laptops, etc. Its really hard and expensive to pull off successfully. You need EVERYONE to work together and have a purpose and goal for this type of program. I guarantee you just about every single time you hear about a BYOD or 1-to-1 initiative failing its because of lack of planning, and professional development. 
    Absolutely. And you're dealing with staff top to bottom that is computer illiterate. Not that they aren't amazing teachers, just that their jobs and protocols is obsolete.
    edited March 2017 supadav03
  • Reply 35 of 83
    jetzjetz Posts: 1,293member
    iPads are nice to have. But most young kids need basic laptops so they can learn to be productive on a computer. So they can type. So they can look up things. Since Apple has no sub-$500 laptops, Chromebooks are just fine. As a taxpayer I don't want the school boards wasting money on more capability than the students need. Give every student a Chromebook. If the parents can afford it, they can get their kids an iPad.
    AI_liasGeorgeBMac
  • Reply 36 of 83
    bluefire1bluefire1 Posts: 886member
    The good news: The iPad remains the best educational tool bar none.
    The bad news: All but the richest school districts want the least expensive devices and could care less about privacy concerns and repairs.
    You really do get what you pay for.


  • Reply 37 of 83
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,823member
    sflocal said:
    Sad, but the reality is that most schools will use what is the cheapest, not the best.  My nephews use Chromebooks in school and it just pains me to see the frustrations in their faces when those cheap pieces of junk act up.  
    It pains me to see in classrooms these stupid apple laptops which are too thin with terrible keyboards.  Why they are obsessed with laptops so thin is beyond me.  As a long time shareholder I think their laptops suck.
    This makes no sense what so ever. Schools are not buying Macs because of their thinness and your opinion on a keyboard. Usually, its because they can get a ChromeBook for about $1,000 cheaper. They can get 5 ChromeBooks for the price of 1 Mac laptop. 
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 38 of 83
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,823member

    appex said:
    Apple could reduce price of all devices by 50%, and still make huge profits, besides tremendously boosting market share.
    They could...but Apple isn't in a race to the bottom either. The day they start is the day Apple truly dies. They'll just be another company like the rest in the end. 
    magman1979pscooter63
  • Reply 39 of 83
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,414member
    bluefire1 said:
    The good news: The iPad remains the best educational tool bar none.
    The bad news: All but the richest school districts want the least expensive devices and could care less about privacy concerns and repairs.
    You really do get what you pay for.


    Well based on what's anticipated to come out of the department of education, that situation may only get worse in public schools, but on the private, parochial, and home school front, they may end up with considerably more money to invest in the best tech experience available, based on the priority of the institution, and the money they receive. 
  • Reply 40 of 83
    eumaeuseumaeus Posts: 8member

    stickista said:
    I'm as big an iPad fan as they come, and even I think that ChromeBooks are a far better solution for classrooms.
    Spoken by someone who has obviously never used a junker ChromeBook, nor who values their privacy and is willing to hand it over to Google on a silver platter.
    I have used Chromebooks, and (more to the point) my daughter uses them at her high school. She is perfectly content, despite the fact that we are an all Mac and iPad household at home. She really likes the ease with which she can access her school work from our Macs at home, in the same environment. 

    I appreciate and value top-quality hardware, more than most people, but I think Chromebooks, junkers or otherwise, are just fine for schools. Especially for poorly funded public schools. The best tool in the world might not be the best tool for a particular job.
    AI_liasgatorguyGeorgeBMacqwwera
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