Google Keep for iPhone and Mac disappoints, imposes profound limitations on users

Posted:
in General Discussion edited March 2017
Even with Google's powerful search, the company's Keep service is too lightweight for serious use, but AppleInsider squeezes the most out of it that we can.




Google Keep is usually referred to as being in the same class as Evernote, OneNote, DEVONthink and Apple Notes. However, in practice it's just not in the same league.

That's really surprising in a product from Google, which typically goes by the rule that with great power comes terrible design. Google Maps and Gmail, for instance, are both vastly more powerful than their rivals but are maddeningly fiddly to use. Google Keep isn't fiddly but it has little power, barely enough to make this better than sticking Post-It notes on your screen.

If design were just about appearance, then Google Keep beats all comers. It is bright, colorful and modern-looking where all of its rivals could do with some new paint on the edges. However, design encompasses both how something works and how you use it.

The reason for getting one of this type of note app instead of just staying with TextEdit or saving things in your email is generally two-fold. The most important reason is a need to manage a lot of information, which means storing and quickly retrieving all sorts of data from text you've typed to PDFs you've dragged in. The next most important is the ability to very quickly add new information.

If you already have Google Keep open on your Mac's browser than you can swiftly drag certain items to it. You can also immediately start typing notes into a blank section at the top of the page. If you already have Google Keep open on your iOS device then you can tap Take a Note and begin writing.




It's just when you don't happen to have the site or the app open that it's a chore. Evernote optionally gives you a menubar app on Mac that you can call up with a keystroke and start typing into. DEVONthink has a similar feature called up by a keystroke or by opening the Sorter on the side of your Mac screen.

Google Keep has nothing like this. You really need to be in it all the time to make it worth using.

The service and app Google Keep can store text and images in GIF, JPEG, PNG and Google's own WEBP format. They must be less than 10MB and 25 megapixels. You'll note that we didn't mention PDFs -- more on that in a bit.

You can add voice notes on iOS, even though Google's own support pages say this feature is exclusive to Android devices. If you do add voice notes then, very nicely, what you say is transcribed automatically. No other note service we tried has this feature.

If you're using the iOS app or the Chrome browser then you can save web pages but what it really saves is a bookmark to them. So you can't archive a page as it appears today, you can only store a link to it.




Most significantly of all, you can't add any PDFs to Google Keep. So if you're collecting any research, gathering any information, you have to have a second app: Google Keep cannot be your sole one.




Consequently, Google Keep is for notes you type yourself, images within certain quite reasonable limits, and bookmarks to web pages. Even with the limitations, you can still end up with a lot of notes over time - and that's another area where Google Keep is very weak.

As it's a Google product, there is an extensive and powerful search feature to help you find a note you've written. However, you cannot, say, group all your notes about a planned vacation into one notebook as you would in Evernote, one section as you would in OneNote or one database as you might in DEVONthink.

You can tag and then you can search on those tags. Plus Google recently introduced an automated tagging feature: Google scans through all your text and categorizes notes based on what it finds. That's nice, and it works, but you don't know what the categories are and you can't impose any other organization on your notes.

We said that Google Keep is like sticking Post-It notes on your monitor. It is. Just as your monitor can only hold so many, treat Google Keep the same. If you just need to jot down something for today, Google Keep is fine.

If you are doing any kind of protracted work gathering information, writing lots of notes or trying to organize your thoughts, Google Keep is worthless on its own.

It's possible that this will change: the service has continued to develop throughout the four years since its launch. However, Google Keep replaced Google Notebook which did let you organise your notes and was shuttered after six years.

The most recent development to Google Keep sees it being added to the company's G Suite of apps that already includes the word processor Google Docs. Now from within Google Docs you can save text to Google Keep.

That seems to be just a way of guaranteeing that you end up with more notes than Google Keep can usefully manage for you.

It also works the other way, too, letting you save notes to Google Docs. However, that seems like turning Google Docs into an app for keeping the notes you can no longer find in Google Keep.

For whatever reason, Google Keep continues to be regarded as a competitor to the likes of Evernote and the rest but that doesn't seem to be what Google wants and it isn't what Google delivers.

Google Keep is a free online service and there is an iOS app which requires iOS 8.0 or higher and is on the App Store.
HBW1
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 24
    steven n.steven n. Posts: 1,124member
    "That's really surprising in a product from Google, which typically goes by the rule that with great power comes terrible design. Google Maps and Gmail, for instance, are both vastly more powerful than their rivals but are maddeningly fiddly to use."

    Thanks. I thought I was the only one in the world that found Google Maps mind-numbingly bad design, cumbersome and just a RPITA. From it's horrible zoom tracking on fingers to slow frame-rate updates it is just cumbersome. It has some really good data but the UI... Just horrid.
    Deelronpscooter63cornchipjony0
  • Reply 2 of 24
    Herbivore2Herbivore2 Posts: 362member
    What good is vastly more power if it's not available for use. 

    It's like having a heavily modified Corvette with 1200 horsepower but the car is stuck in the garage most of the time because the fuel pump doesn't work properly and there's no one to fix it. Getting it out means a rough ride and the engine cutting out all the time. 

    The 90 horsepower dog ugly Yaris (the car looks worse than the old AMC Gremlin) would actually do a better job from getting from point A to B. 

    Apple maps works well for me. And if I am at the desktop, I will use Bing instead. 

    I will only use YouTube from Google on occasion for a how to video. The rest of their product offerings offer very little from what else is available. 
    cornchip
  • Reply 3 of 24
    Wouldn't it serve Google more to make Keep on iOS a freaking mess? That way it might steer iPhone users to Android hardware. I'm guessing Keep on Android works better.
  • Reply 4 of 24
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 4,701member
    Wouldn't it serve Google more to make Keep on iOS a freaking mess? That way it might steer iPhone users to Android hardware. I'm guessing Keep on Android works better.
    Not a good idea considering that Google makes a shitload of money from iOS users and next to nothing from Android users.
    watto_cobracornchip
  • Reply 5 of 24
    I use Keep as mobile post-its.... for research storage, search-ability etc.... its all on Google Drive. Workflows that someone would use for Keep and Evernote, are totally different, and honestly should not even be compared. Its like comparing a Lamborghini, to an F-22 Raptor. I found Keep on iOS and Android to have about the same, though new features usually show up on Android a little be quicker.
  • Reply 6 of 24
    davendaven Posts: 544member
    Wouldn't it serve Google more to make Keep on iOS a freaking mess? That way it might steer iPhone users to Android hardware. I'm guessing Keep on Android works better.
    Say you are an iOS user who tries Keep. You have a horrible experience. Would that make you want to plunk down serious money on Android hardware knowing that your experience with Google products was horrible? I wouldn't.
    Deelronwatto_cobracornchip
  • Reply 7 of 24
    brakkenbrakken Posts: 687member
    Google Keep my data for advertising purposes direct from their servers to their ad clients! Another fantastic idea from the worlds biggest advertiser. :S
    watto_cobracornchip
  • Reply 8 of 24
    croprcropr Posts: 961member
    sflocal said:
    Wouldn't it serve Google more to make Keep on iOS a freaking mess? That way it might steer iPhone users to Android hardware. I'm guessing Keep on Android works better.
    Not a good idea considering that Google makes a shitload of money from iOS users and next to nothing from Android users.
    In the 2016 figures for the worldwide ads market, the Android share was 1.6 times bigger than the iOS share.   Or was that fake news?
    By the way the Android version is easier to use than the iOS version (thanks to the standard  back button), but in terms of functionality there is no difference. 
    The main advantage of Google Keep is not mentioned  in the article.  It runs everywhere on all my devices without limitation (Evernote is free on maximum 2 devices, Apple Notes is not available on Android, ...)
  • Reply 9 of 24
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,889administrator
    cropr said:
    The main advantage of Google Keep is not mentioned  in the article.  It runs everywhere on all my devices without limitation (Evernote is free on maximum 2 devices, Apple Notes is not available on Android, ...)
    "Google Keep is a free online service"

    Like with the rest of the articles in this "series," we address operational costs.
  • Reply 10 of 24
    What a load of rubbish. Poorly written and researched trash.

    Guys, please save yourself the trouble, and read Mike Elgan's beautiful exposition on Google Keep, why you should use it, and how to use it effectively. 


    You can use tags to organize your notes. All tagged notes are automatically placed in folders. 

    In addition, a note can have multiple tags. Which means a note can be assigned to multiple folders. 

    Tags are the primary means of organization in Keep. And it is clear the author didn't spend much time researching and exploiting Keeps most effective workflows. 

    Once again, read Mike Elgan's article on Keep. It's a better written and well-researched piece than this unsubstantiated anti-Google propaganda.

    Not that I was expecting any better from AppleInsider.
    edited March 2017 cornchip
  • Reply 11 of 24
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,372member
    What a load of rubbish. Poorly written and researched trash.

    Guys, please save yourself the trouble, and read Mike Elgan's beautiful exposition on Google Keep, why you should use it, and how to use it effectively. 


    You can use tags to organize your notes. All tagged notes are automatically placed in folders. 

    In addition, a note can have multiple tags. Which means a note can be assigned to multiple folders. 

    Tags are the primary means of organization in Keep. And it is clear the author didn't spend much time researching and exploiting Keeps most effective workflows. 

    Once again, read Mike Elgan's article on Keep. It's a better written and well-researched piece than this unsubstantiated anti-Google propaganda.

    Not that I was expecting any better from AppleInsider.
    I didn't find the answer to how to place PDFs in your linked article, an obviously essential ability for any such app.  Please can you explain how to do this as you seem to be an expert on the application.  By the way, being snarky about AI with only having visited the site four times, posted seven times and have -22 points (whatever that means) seems a bit off.  AI does an excellent job IMHO.
    edited March 2017
  • Reply 12 of 24
    MacPro said:
    What a load of rubbish. Poorly written and researched trash.

    Guys, please save yourself the trouble, and read Mike Elgan's beautiful exposition on Google Keep, why you should use it, and how to use it effectively. 


    You can use tags to organize your notes. All tagged notes are automatically placed in folders. 

    In addition, a note can have multiple tags. Which means a note can be assigned to multiple folders. 

    Tags are the primary means of organization in Keep. And it is clear the author didn't spend much time researching and exploiting Keeps most effective workflows. 

    Once again, read Mike Elgan's article on Keep. It's a better written and well-researched piece than this unsubstantiated anti-Google propaganda.

    Not that I was expecting any better from AppleInsider.
    I didn't find the answer to how to place PDFs in your linked article, an obviously essential ability for any such app.  Please can you explain how to do this as you seem to be an expert on the application.  By the way, being snarky about AI with only having visited the site four times, posted seven times and have -22 points (whatever that means) seems a bit off.  AI does an excellent job IMHO.
    I avoid visiting this site because of misinformed garbage like this. This site is rife with them. Once in awhile articles like this pop up in my feed, and if I'm bored, I use the opportunity to set the record straight.

    The purpose of a note taking application is to take notes. It is not a storage container for your documents. That's what Google Drive is for. The majority of people who use note taking applications use it to, well, take notes, not store PDF files.

    If you want to reference a PDF document from Google Drive in Google Keep, just place a shareable link for the PDF document in Google Keep and Keep will automatically create an info card for the file inside the Keep note. You know, exactly what it should do. Google Keep uses URIs and URLs as a standard means of reference.

    Using a note taking application as a storage container is a fringe use-case that should not be the metric for evaluating the utility or capability of the app. This article does exactly that because the author clearly has an agenda, or is hopelessly misinformed.
    edited March 2017
  • Reply 13 of 24
    jpellinojpellino Posts: 615member
    Keep is great on iOS. Needs a native MacOS Google-made app. 
  • Reply 14 of 24
    Keep has a limitation of only 50 labels. I stopped using it for anything serious once I discovered this limitation. 
  • Reply 15 of 24
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,889administrator
    MacPro said:
    What a load of rubbish. Poorly written and researched trash.

    Guys, please save yourself the trouble, and read Mike Elgan's beautiful exposition on Google Keep, why you should use it, and how to use it effectively. 


    You can use tags to organize your notes. All tagged notes are automatically placed in folders. 

    In addition, a note can have multiple tags. Which means a note can be assigned to multiple folders. 

    Tags are the primary means of organization in Keep. And it is clear the author didn't spend much time researching and exploiting Keeps most effective workflows. 

    Once again, read Mike Elgan's article on Keep. It's a better written and well-researched piece than this unsubstantiated anti-Google propaganda.

    Not that I was expecting any better from AppleInsider.
    I didn't find the answer to how to place PDFs in your linked article, an obviously essential ability for any such app.  Please can you explain how to do this as you seem to be an expert on the application.  By the way, being snarky about AI with only having visited the site four times, posted seven times and have -22 points (whatever that means) seems a bit off.  AI does an excellent job IMHO.
    I avoid visiting this site because of misinformed garbage like this. This site is rife with them. Once in awhile articles like this pop up in my feed, and if I'm bored, I use the opportunity to set the record straight.

    The purpose of a note taking application is to take notes. It is not a storage container for your documents. That's what Google Drive is for. The majority of people who use note taking applications use it to, well, take notes, not store PDF files.

    If you want to reference a PDF document from Google Drive in Google Keep, just place a shareable link for the PDF document in Google Keep and Keep will automatically create an info card for the file inside the Keep note. You know, exactly what it should do. Google Keep uses URIs and URLs as a standard means of reference.

    Using a note taking application as a storage container is a fringe use-case that should not be the metric for evaluating the utility or capability of the app. This article does exactly that because the author clearly has an agenda, or is hopelessly misinformed.
    Or the author doesn't make excuses for poor execution of a Google product, like you seem to need to.

    EVERY OTHER note taking application we're using has the capability to store the PDF. Every. Single. One.

    You're welcome to discuss matters regarding to tech, and even make excuses for Google should you be so inclined, but keep your conspiracy theories and name calling to yourself. Consider yourself warned.
  • Reply 16 of 24
    MacPro said:
    What a load of rubbish. Poorly written and researched trash.

    Guys, please save yourself the trouble, and read Mike Elgan's beautiful exposition on Google Keep, why you should use it, and how to use it effectively. 


    You can use tags to organize your notes. All tagged notes are automatically placed in folders. 

    In addition, a note can have multiple tags. Which means a note can be assigned to multiple folders. 

    Tags are the primary means of organization in Keep. And it is clear the author didn't spend much time researching and exploiting Keeps most effective workflows. 

    Once again, read Mike Elgan's article on Keep. It's a better written and well-researched piece than this unsubstantiated anti-Google propaganda.

    Not that I was expecting any better from AppleInsider.
    I didn't find the answer to how to place PDFs in your linked article, an obviously essential ability for any such app.  Please can you explain how to do this as you seem to be an expert on the application.  By the way, being snarky about AI with only having visited the site four times, posted seven times and have -22 points (whatever that means) seems a bit off.  AI does an excellent job IMHO.
    I avoid visiting this site because of misinformed garbage like this. This site is rife with them. Once in awhile articles like this pop up in my feed, and if I'm bored, I use the opportunity to set the record straight.

    The purpose of a note taking application is to take notes. It is not a storage container for your documents. That's what Google Drive is for. The majority of people who use note taking applications use it to, well, take notes, not store PDF files.

    If you want to reference a PDF document from Google Drive in Google Keep, just place a shareable link for the PDF document in Google Keep and Keep will automatically create an info card for the file inside the Keep note. You know, exactly what it should do. Google Keep uses URIs and URLs as a standard means of reference.

    Using a note taking application as a storage container is a fringe use-case that should not be the metric for evaluating the utility or capability of the app. This article does exactly that because the author clearly has an agenda, or is hopelessly misinformed.
    Or the author doesn't make excuses for poor execution of a Google product, like you seem to need to.

    EVERY OTHER note taking application we're using has the capability to store the PDF. Every. Single. One.

    You're welcome to discuss matters regarding to tech, and even make excuses for Google should you be so inclined, but keep your conspiracy theories and name calling to yourself. Consider yourself warned.
    This is AppleInsider. Every Google product is poorly executed in this reality distorted realm.

    After all, in this fantasy, Gmail and Google Maps are "terribly designed".

    Tell me how anyone is supposed to take this publication seriously with claims this absurd and baseless?

    These are the best cloud services in their respective categories. They are the most used cloud services in their respective categories. They are considered the gold standard measure by which all other services, in their respective categories, are judged.

    So, how do "terribly designed" products earn such accolades and universal acclaim?

    I'm guessing in these parts, Apple Maps and Apple Mail are the "best executed" products in comparison.

    Google has a robust storage service for documents in Google Drive. Google Keep is designed to integrate seamlessly with other Google services, like Google Drive, Google's own robust document container. You can reference any document, not just PDF files, from Google Drive in Google Keep.

    The benefits of referencing documents from Google Drive is that there are no size limitations. You can reference a 1TB document from Drive in Keep for all Google cares.

    I'm guessing the designers at Google figured a note taking application's focus should be capturing ideas, not storing and managing documents. Especially since they have a more than capable service for storing and managing documents with no restrictive limitations.

    I suppose there's an argument to be made that Google could provide a seamless function in Keep that automatically uploads documents to Drive and then transparently references them in Keep. That would be constructive criticism.

    But when it comes to Google and AppleInsider nothing is constructive much less objective. In light of how "terribly designed" Gmail and Google Maps are, is it any surprise that this publication finds Google Keep "disappointing and profoundly limited"? But excuse me, for entertaining "conspiracy theories".
  • Reply 17 of 24
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,889administrator
    This is AppleInsider. Every Google product is poorly executed in this reality distorted realm.

    After all, in this fantasy, Gmail and Google Maps are "terribly designed".

    Tell me how anyone is supposed to take this publication seriously with claims this absurd and baseless?

    These are the best cloud services in their respective categories. They are the most used cloud services in their respective categories. They are considered the gold standard measure by which all other services, in their respective categories, are judged.

    So, how do "terribly designed" products earn such accolades and universal acclaim?

    I'm guessing in these parts, Apple Maps and Apple Mail are the "best executed" products in comparison.

    Google has a robust storage service for documents in Google Drive. Google Keep is designed to integrate seamlessly with other Google services, like Google Drive, Google's own robust document container. You can reference any document, not just PDF files, from Google Drive in Google Keep.

    The benefits of referencing documents from Google Drive is that there are no size limitations. You can reference a 1TB document from Drive in Keep for all Google cares.

    I'm guessing the designers at Google figured a note taking application's focus should be capturing ideas, not storing and managing documents. Especially since they have a more than capable service for storing and managing documents with no restrictive limitations.

    I suppose there's an argument to be made that Google could provide a seamless function in Keep that automatically uploads documents to Drive and then transparently references them in Keep. That would be constructive criticism.

    But when it comes to Google and AppleInsider nothing is constructive much less objective. In light of how "terribly designed" Gmail and Google Maps are, is it any surprise that this publication finds Google Keep "disappointing and profoundly limited"? But excuse me, for entertaining "conspiracy theories".
    In most of these points, you're conflating the power of the service with the design and UI of it. I love my Gmail accounts -- but the official Google iOS app is garbage. Google Maps is an amazingly effective service and the browser interface is pretty great, but the iOS app's UI is also miserable, and counter-intuitive. 

    Everybody else figured out that storing and managing documents seamlessly MIGHT be a good part of a note-taker -- and they had in the past. Google Notebook was pretty good at all of this, but they closed it in favor of Keep. 

    So yeah, a step backwards in functionality and usability is disappointing and profoundly limited.

    They get "accolades and universal acclaim" for the power they bring to the table, but that's not the whole story, is it?
    edited March 2017
  • Reply 18 of 24
    This is AppleInsider. Every Google product is poorly executed in this reality distorted realm.

    After all, in this fantasy, Gmail and Google Maps are "terribly designed".

    Tell me how anyone is supposed to take this publication seriously with claims this absurd and baseless?

    These are the best cloud services in their respective categories. They are the most used cloud services in their respective categories. They are considered the gold standard measure by which all other services, in their respective categories, are judged.

    So, how do "terribly designed" products earn such accolades and universal acclaim?

    I'm guessing in these parts, Apple Maps and Apple Mail are the "best executed" products in comparison.

    Google has a robust storage service for documents in Google Drive. Google Keep is designed to integrate seamlessly with other Google services, like Google Drive, Google's own robust document container. You can reference any document, not just PDF files, from Google Drive in Google Keep.

    The benefits of referencing documents from Google Drive is that there are no size limitations. You can reference a 1TB document from Drive in Keep for all Google cares.

    I'm guessing the designers at Google figured a note taking application's focus should be capturing ideas, not storing and managing documents. Especially since they have a more than capable service for storing and managing documents with no restrictive limitations.

    I suppose there's an argument to be made that Google could provide a seamless function in Keep that automatically uploads documents to Drive and then transparently references them in Keep. That would be constructive criticism.

    But when it comes to Google and AppleInsider nothing is constructive much less objective. In light of how "terribly designed" Gmail and Google Maps are, is it any surprise that this publication finds Google Keep "disappointing and profoundly limited"? But excuse me, for entertaining "conspiracy theories".
    In most of these points, you're conflating the power of the service with the design and UI of it. I love my Gmail accounts -- but the official Google iOS app is garbage. Google Maps is an amazingly effective service and the browser interface is pretty great, but the iOS app's UI is also miserable, and counter-intuitive. 

    Everybody else figured out that storing and managing documents seamlessly MIGHT be a good part of a note-taker -- and they had in the past. Google Notebook was pretty good at all of this, but they closed it in favor of Keep. 

    So yeah, a step backwards in functionality and usability is disappointing and profoundly limited.

    They get "accolades and universal acclaim" for the power they bring to the table, but that's not the whole story, is it?
    And you're conflating design with pretty colors and superficial user interface flourishes.

    What use are pretty visual assets and 60FPS animations if in an emergency, a mapping service navigates me to the middle of the ocean?

    What use are elegant typography and beautiful iconography if the result of a query from a mapping services is a location 2000 miles away, as opposed to the contextually relevant one 3 blocks away?

    And therein lies the problem with Apple and its hardcore proponents. They often conflate good design with pretty visuals, at the expense of thoroughly researched and well-executed use-cases.

    "Form over function" has always been Apple's design ethos. And the pitfalls of this philosophy is evident in many of their products, like Apple Maps.

    If we can move past the misconception that good design is characterized by well-sculpted user interface widgets and pretty visual assets, as opposed to well-researched use-cases, then the idea that Google services are "terribly designed" becomes laughable.

    Take for example Mail on iOS. I remember a time when it refused to allow me to attach files to it. Is this great design? Don't get me wrong, Mail has always looked pretty. But pretty is not good design. And if a service is an impediment to my productivity then it is clearly "terribly designed" no matter how pretty is looks.

    Good design empowers. It doesn't limit. It doesn't restrict. It doesn't mislead. It doesn't elucidate a feeling of anxiousness or helplessness. And it's certainly not about pretty pixels.

    I won't bore you with my war stories about Apple Maps. But I do know how I feel when I use it compared to Google Maps. And that feeling is what separates great design from great visuals.

    When I use Google Maps, I feel empowered. I feel assured. I feel confident. When I use Apple Maps I feel the complete opposite.

    A couple of hours ago, I told Google Maps to navigate me to a point of interest. It gladly obliged. But what it did next, is why I insist that your characterization of Google's products and services, as "terribly designed", is tainted by your emotional attachment to Apple, and not ration.

    It told me the store I intended to visit was closed. If that is not a great and thoughtful design, I don't know what is. This is an experience that Apple Maps doesn't deliver today. Apple Maps sure does look pretty, but again that is not the definition of a well-designed product by any stretch of the imagination.

    Google Keep is not the most featureful note-taking application out there. Google designed Keep to balance simplicity and smarts. If you approach it the way you do a traditional note-taking application like Evernote, well, you're going to be "profoundly disappointed".

    But if you learn to exploit its simplicity, it's great search capabilities, its unparalleled AI and Machine Learning chops, its collaboration features, and its many other smarts, you're going to be pleasantly surprised. An open mind is needed for this exploration. If you're already predisposed to believing Google products and services are "terribly designed" don't bother.

    Also Google Keep, naturally, is designed to work well with Google services like Chrome, Calendar, Gmail, Photos, Drive, Docs, Google Now, Google Assistant and Google Home. For example, your use-case of referencing a PDF file works best if the file is available in Google Drive. It's a minor inconvenience, but I insist storing and managing documents is neither a fundamental nor popular use-case of a note-taking service.

    I'm also not ignoring the possibility that Google Keep just doesn't meet your needs. And that Evernote or Apple Note is appropriate for your workflow. But this article, especially the underhanded slights against Google in it, gives me the feeling that Google Keep was doomed from the start, and that this experiment was not an exercise in objectivity.

    And this is my qualm with AppleInsider. I own and use Apple products, but I'm sick of the herd mentality that permeates the community and that automatically ascribes to the tenets that anything Apple does is "great design" and everything Google does is "evil and terrible". This is a common thread with any Google-related thread on this publication.

    Anyway, this article, by Mike Elgan, is required reading for anyone really interested in exploring the many hidden and smart features of Google Keep.

    https://goo.gl/IDZxfn
  • Reply 19 of 24
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,889administrator
    You're making a lot of assumptions, here, including that I haven't read Elgan's piece. 

    You're right. Keep didn't meet my needs. However, I came into it wanting it to, mostly because of Google Mail and Google Drive. In my opinion, they made too many design decisions steering it away from an ideal solution, and towards some sort of strange in-between -- when they once had a better solution and put it out to pasture.
    edited March 2017
  • Reply 20 of 24
    blah64blah64 Posts: 941member
    "Google Keep is a free online service and..."

    None of google's services are free, you just pay for them with your privacy.  That's WAY too expensive for me.

    "When I use Google Maps, I feel empowered. I feel assured. I feel confident. "

    When I use google maps (very rarely), I feel dirty.  Like I need to shower, after being forced to walk through a sewer to find the info I wanted.

    What a sad world we have become, inculcated with the notions that it's okay to hand over every detail of one's life to data mining and data analysis companies.
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