Apple Park drone footage may be ending, with security forces seeking to cease flights

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 32
    zoetmbzoetmb Posts: 2,631member
    NemWan said:
    The drone issue is bigger than Apple. Laws about navigable airspace aren't up-to-date with remote-piloted or autonomous drones. Imagine when technology advances a little further and a drone can be as small, light, and inconspicuous as a bird or insect (or even actual cyborg birds and insects), and there's no longer a noise or safety argument to be made but only privacy and property-rights questions. The drone might not even be observed or known about until footage is released. Then it's a First Amendment question — you got the footage without bothering anybody but it will bother them to release it. With recent news about successfully storing and retrieving data in DNA it might be possible in some future to have a fully biological "drone" whose memory reproduces with the organism, making distribution unstoppable.

    "Only" privacy and property-rights questions?  That's a pretty enormous "only."  It wasn't that long ago that property rights extended down to the center of the Earth and up into the stratosphere.  
    No it didn't.  If it did, you would have been able to stop airplanes from flying overhead.   
  • Reply 22 of 32
    zoetmbzoetmb Posts: 2,631member

    lkrupp said:
    I was wondering how long Apple would tolerate these drone flights. Now we know.
    What's the freaking big deal?  Apple needs to learn to relax.   And I don't see how Apple's security guards can stop anyone if they're not standing on Apple property.    Security people try to pull this crap all the time.   The drone pilot should have said, "fine...call the cops".    Apple cannot demand that anyone be "forcibly removed" from someone else's property.   If that's what Apple wanted, they should have bought the surrounding land and built a buffer zone or they go through legal channels to get the area declared a "no fly zone".   

    I saw a security guard on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan try to stop some tourists from taking photos of a building from the sidewalk.   I told him he had no legal right to do that - that they could take pictures of whatever they wanted from the street.   And furthermore, it was useless and stupid anyway because one could walk across the street and shoot with a telephoto lens and they'd never even know it was happening.   He gave me the "I'm just doing my job" line.   I told him he could tell people to stop doing something that they were legally able to do, but they didn't have to comply.  

    As a photographer, I walk around with a document issued by the NYC police department which basically states that people have the right to take photos of anything (on public property) as long as they're not blocking traffic or pedestrians.   I do that because most cops don't actually know their own regulations.   
    edited July 2017
  • Reply 23 of 32
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 5,418member
    zoetmb said:

    lkrupp said:
    I was wondering how long Apple would tolerate these drone flights. Now we know.
    What's the freaking big deal?  Apple needs to learn to relax.   And I don't see how Apple's security guards can stop anyone if they're not standing on Apple property.    Security people try to pull this crap all the time.   The drone pilot should have said, "fine...call the cops".    Apple cannot demand that anyone be "forcibly removed" from someone else's property.   If that's what Apple wanted, they should have bought the surrounding land and built a buffer zone or they go through legal channels to get the area declared a "no fly zone".   

    I saw a security guard on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan try to stop some tourists from taking photos of a building from the sidewalk.   I told him he had no legal right to do that - that they could take pictures of whatever they wanted from the street.   And furthermore, it was useless and stupid anyway because one could walk across the street and shoot with a telephoto lens and they'd never even know it was happening.   He gave me the "I'm just doing my job" line.   I told him he could tell people to stop doing something that they were legally able to do, but they didn't have to comply.  

    As a photographer, I walk around with a document issued by the NYC police department which basically states that people have the right to take photos of anything (on public property) as long as they're not blocking traffic or pedestrians.   I do that because most cops don't actually know their own regulations.   

    No, Apple doesn't need to relax. If this becomes a security issue for them, and/or a safety issue then I think Apple has every right to keep something from entering their space. Do you really want to get into the straw picking argument that well the person controlling it is in the Walgreen's parking lot so its okay. So if I were your neighbor its okay for me to build a contraption that hovers over your property and records you. Well the contraption is housed on my land and never touches yours. It's just in the air over yours and happens to be recording you so thats okay, right?
    anantksundaram
  • Reply 24 of 32
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    cgWerks said:
    If it weren't California, maybe Apple employees could take up skeet-shooting at break time? :wink: 

    Or "skeet-surfin'"...
  • Reply 25 of 32
    I don't know where the reporter is getting his information from, but there is no FAA rule requiring drones to keep 360 feet away from structures. That is just made up.
    Also, Apple security has no authority to do ANYTHING off of Apple property.
    So long as the drone pilot takes off and lands from outside of Apple property, and operates the drone while standing off of Apple property, a remote pilot can fly over private property. Apple also has the right to photograph over your property and use it in their Apple maps, and they do just that.
    However, Apple Campus 2 is "Class C" airspace and a 107 remote pilot does need to get clearance from the FAA before flying there.
    securtis
  • Reply 26 of 32
    fred1fred1 Posts: 1,010member
    The Visitor Center is "across the street"?? Uh, where? The Apple Maps view doesn't gave any labels. I hope it gas a good view of the main building. 
  • Reply 27 of 32
    Craig Frederighi forecast this at the June Apple Event (@ 1hr 50m) humourlessly suggesting keeping drones away from Apple Park using trained eagles or a glass dome!

    SpamSandwichmattinoz
  • Reply 28 of 32
    charlitunacharlituna Posts: 7,217member
    lightvox said:
    I'm surprised they let it go on for as long as they did...
    they didn't have the full staff there. once they do then they will likely run afoul of state privacy laws. 
  • Reply 29 of 32
    charlitunacharlituna Posts: 7,217member

    svanthem said:
    So far I'm not seeing any legal recourse in place that would prevent drone operators so long as they aren't starting on Apple property, especially if they're maintaining an altitude about 365 feet and below 400 feet when over Apple's property.

    If the flights are originating from a surrounding property within 360 feet of structures aren't they illegal from the get-go?
    california has some very strict stalking and privacy laws. they could apply here. after all its not a public area like a park or a beach or a mall. 
  • Reply 30 of 32
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 2,843member
    SpamSandwich said:
    Or "skeet-surfin'"...
    rochford said:
    Craig Frederighi forecast this at the June Apple Event (@ 1hr 50m) humourlessly suggesting keeping drones away from Apple Park using trained eagles or a glass dome!

    Or, put some of that AI technology to work on some drones to capture these drones. They could give them away to employees or put them up on eBay. ;)

  • Reply 31 of 32
    mattinozmattinoz Posts: 1,946member
    So the eagles are just a back up plan then?
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