Western Digital debuts My Book Duo with up to 20TB of external storage

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware edited August 2017
Western Digital this week launched the My Book Duo, an external RAID storage system that comes with up to 20 terabytes of storage, and as well as a USB-C port simplifying connections with recent Macs.

Western Digital My Book Duo


The Duo relies on WD's Red network-attached storage drives, with reads up to 360 megabytes per second and additional support for 256-bit AES hardware encryption. Capacity options include 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, or 20 terabytes.

Though equipped with USB-C, bundled cables let the unit work with USB 2.0 and 3.0 computers as well. Two USB-A ports are actually meant for connecting accessories like card readers, USB drives, keyboards, and mice -- WD notes that owners can in fact sync and charge a phone.

By default the Duo is NTFS-formatted for Windows systems, but it can be reformatted for use with Macs.

Prices for the My Book Duo start at $259.99 for 4 terabytes and range up to $849.99 for 20 terabytes. B&H is taking orders for all storage capacities with free expedited shipping and no tax collected outside NY and NJ. Amazon is also accepting backorders.
«1

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 33
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 10,557member
    Not enough for my music collection. You just know that comment is coming sooner or later.
    edited August 2017 zeus423macxpressjbdragonquadra 610watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 33
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 5,776member
    Who the hell needs 20TB of space? Thats a lot of stolen music and movies. 
    williamlondon
  • Reply 3 of 33
    I'll never forget this crazyapplerumor: "Holds up to 4 internal drives FOR ALL THE PORN IN THE WORLD! OK, not really, but a lot of porn."
    macxpress
  • Reply 4 of 33
    macxpress said:
    Who the hell needs 20TB of space? Thats a lot of stolen music and movies. 
    Well this product is great news for people like me who are involved in modern DNA sequencing projects, where individual data files are in the range of 50-100 GB each.  A single 96-sample run can generate 5TB of data in a few hours, and yes this often means hard drives are express-shipped to customers.  "Never underestimate the bandwidth of a US Mail truck full of hard drives, traveling down the highway at 65 MPH"

    Skeptical? The human genome is 3 billion base pairs of DNA.  Even with only 20-fold redundancy (needed for assembly) that's 60 gigabases, which is 60 Gbyte of ascii data.  Now think about the companies offering full- genome sequencing to the public, and the many people willing to pay a few thousand bucks each for the service. 

    Now think of all the plant, animal, and microbial research being done in the world, and understand that many of these organisms are having their DNA being sequenced by someone.  And not just once, but multiple instances of each species....  Data storage is a major issue.  PS: the last Mac I bought is outfitted with 128 GB of RAM....
    edited August 2017 longpathchiaSpamSandwichwilliamlondonRacerhomieXwatto_cobrauniscape
  • Reply 5 of 33
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 10,557member
    macxpress said:
    Who the hell needs 20TB of space? Thats a lot of stolen music and movies. 
    Real professionals who work on gigantic projects like movies, medical research, etc. This is not a ‘home’ product although some will buy it just to brag.
    edited August 2017 longpathRacerhomieXfastasleep
  • Reply 6 of 33
    Very nice and at a really nice price. If my Xserve Raid ever dies I’ll buy one of those. That 100 pound beast is still humming along after almost nine years and still using the original fourteen drives. 
    RacerhomieXwatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 33
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    macxpress said:
    Who the hell needs 20TB of space? Thats a lot of stolen music and movies. 
    Video and movie production could easily fill this.
    RacerhomieXfastasleepwatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 33
    appexappex Posts: 687member
    Bring SSD. Once you try it, you do not want mechanical rotational disks, even for free!

  • Reply 9 of 33
    zoetmbzoetmb Posts: 2,652member
    macxpress said:
    Who the hell needs 20TB of space? Thats a lot of stolen music and movies. 
    I remember in the early 90's getting a call from a designer friend of mine asking me whether she'd ever need anything larger than a 20MB hard drive.   And me, being the tech genius said, "Noooooo, of course not.   I've been using my Mac with a 20MB hard drive for years and only a tiny bit of it is used up."   In fact, some years before that, I remember when Tandy (Radio Shack) came out with a 1MB hard drive the size of a laser disc player and I said, "who the hell would ever need that?"

    And now an AAC-encoded long song can be 20MB all by itself.  A single raw file out of a 36MP DSLR can be 48MB and then another 15MB for the JPG.   And then you Photoshop the file, but want to keep the originals, so that's another TIFF, which can be very large or another JPG which is another 15MB.   So you have at least 66MB for a single image and now multiply that by however many images one might shoot in a year.   It adds up fast. 

    MP4 1080p movies of about 10-20 minutes can be almost 3GB each.  And remember, one might store the original footage, the final edited footage and the intermediate files created by the video editing application.   As people move to 4K and potentially in years forward to 8K, the storage requirements are going to be enormous.    

    I'm very good at getting rid of unnecessary files and clearing email boxes out, etc., and my Mac is almost at a Terabyte already.   Sure, I still see 20TB as excessive, but if I was doing video every day as a pro it wouldn't be.   If I bought this drive, I'd probably buy 4TB, but every time I've made a decision like that thinking it would be enough, I've always regretted it afterwards because it was never enough.  
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 33
    quadra 610quadra 610 Posts: 6,757member
    WD's hardware encryption is an expensive nuisance. If anything happens to the drive or controller, you're screwed. 

    It was cheaper for me (and it worked out the same) to harvest the drive from the case and drop it into an external enclosure. 
    edited August 2017 almondroca
  • Reply 11 of 33
    kantxkantx Posts: 22member
    appex said:
    Bring SSD. Once you try it, you do not want mechanical rotational disks, even for free!

    SSD have a limited ride too.
  • Reply 12 of 33
    Does the Encryption work on the Mac with NTFS formatting in place?
  • Reply 13 of 33
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,508member
    As on another site that reported this, it makes it look as though this is something special, which it’s not. 10TB drives have been available for a while now, and anyone could just buy a raid case from OWC, or somewhere else, and have their 20TB raid. Otherwise, you could opt for much cheaper 8TB drives, as I have, and get 3 for a 24TB raid, as I have. I have two, in fact, one as a backup to the other. You can buy a 8TB archive drive for about $220. It’s a fast enough drive for almost anything, and when raided with two others, will push the SATA 3 limit. Mirror two, as I do, and you’ve got speed, capacity and safety. So even with this raid, unless you’re using it as a mirror, and so just getting 10TB from it, which I haven’t bothered looking into, as you might not be able to do that with this,  you still need two, one for backup.

    and 12TB drives have been out for a few months, though they’re still pretty expensive, and hard to get out of an enterprise sale volume purchase, but that will change shortly, as bigger drives come out later this year, or early next year.

    I checked. This does come with raid 0/1 support.
    edited August 2017 hmurchisonfastasleepwatto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 33
    linkmanlinkman Posts: 1,035member
    macxpress said:
    Who the hell needs 20TB of space? Thats a lot of stolen music and movies. 
    Well this product is great news for people like me who are involved in modern DNA sequencing projects, where individual data files are in the range of 50-100 GB each.  A single 96-sample run can generate 5TB of data in a few hours, and yes this often means hard drives are express-shipped to customers.  "Never underestimate the bandwidth of a US Mail truck full of hard drives, traveling down the highway at 65 MPH"

    Skeptical? The human genome is 3 billion base pairs of DNA.  Even with only 20-fold redundancy (needed for assembly) that's 60 gigabases, which is 60 Gbyte of ascii data.  Now think about the companies offering full- genome sequencing to the public, and the many people willing to pay a few thousand bucks each for the service. 

    Now think of all the plant, animal, and microbial research being done in the world, and understand that many of these organisms are having their DNA being sequenced by someone.  And not just once, but multiple instances of each species....  Data storage is a major issue.  PS: the last Mac I bought is outfitted with 128 GB of RAM....
    It sounds like compression would save a LOT of space with that. What is a typical compression factor for it?
  • Reply 15 of 33
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,401member
    melgross said:
    As on another site that reported this, it makes it look as though this is something special, which it’s not. 10TB drives have been available for a while now, and anyone could just buy a raid case from OWC, or somewhere else, and have their 20TB raid. Otherwise, you could opt for much cheaper 8TB drives, as I have, and get 3 for a 24TB raid, as I have. I have two, in fact, one as a backup to the other. You can buy a 8TB archive drive for about $220. It’s a fast enough drive for almost anything, and when raided with two others, will push the SATA 3 limit. Mirror two, as I do, and you’ve got speed, capacity and safety. So even with this raid, unless you’re using it as a mirror, and so just getting 10TB from it, which I haven’t bothered looking into, as you might not be able to do that with this,  you still need two, one for backup.

    and 12TB drives have been out for a few months, though they’re still pretty expensive, and hard to get out of an enterprise sale volume purchase, but that will change shortly, as bigger drives come out later this year, or early next year.

    I checked. This does come with raid 0/1 support.
    Yup.  I think Seagate made a statement that they expect to reach 20TB or so on a single drive in the next 24 months or so.  

    Here it is 
    https://www.extremetech.com/computing/243530-seagate-plans-16tb-drives-2018-20tb-2020 ;

    Storage and Networking speeds are in alignment with the the ideal that enthusiasts will eschew streaming for media servers at home that have high quality versions of their content available locally.  I'm already hitting Comcast's bandwidth cap pretty regularly.
  • Reply 16 of 33
    jbdragonjbdragon Posts: 2,294member
    I have over 13TB on my NAS at home. That's with 6 3TB HDD's. This WD is using 2 10TB HDD to get 20TB. It's not going to be 20TB though. For one thing, wouldn't you want this at least in RAID1? At which point it makes this just over 9TB is size, not 20!!! If you want to risk losing all that Data, then stick with the Raid 0, and it's just acts as one big HDD. But it still only works out to 18.2TB of space, not 20TB.

    This is the whole HDD Manufactures calling a byte 1000, and Ram company's calling a byte 1024. Windows shows things at 1024. Does the Mac? When you get up into such large HDD sizes, that small difference add's up. Then you lose a little more space to formatting.

    My NAS is maxed out in drives, but I can go to larger HDD's. Just popping in 6TB HDD, I could jump my space to over 32TB in Raid5. If I went with the 10TB drives they are using, I could have 54.5TB of space.

    You should see my DVD, HD DVD and Blu-Ray collection. I have a lot of movies. Blu-Ray's really take up a lot of space fast. But it's nice ripping all my movies and putting them on my NAS and having PLEX serve them all up in any room in my house or away from my house. I can then throw the discs into my large binders as a last resort backup. Takes up a whole lot less space. Going 4K, which I haven't done yet, just makes it all that much worse.

    Remember the Disc changers in the past here it would hold like 100 Discs. You thought WOW. I'm so far past that. Using PLEX, I get all the info shown to me similar to Netflix. I have different users accounts. No more hunting around for a disc. So a lot of storage space is great. A raid is not a backup. It allows easy access to a large amount of Data at once. it should still be backed up! So really, if you want one of these 20TB WD units to put your Data on, you might as well buy 2 of them. One for your Data and one for the backup!
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 33
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,508member
    melgross said:
    As on another site that reported this, it makes it look as though this is something special, which it’s not. 10TB drives have been available for a while now, and anyone could just buy a raid case from OWC, or somewhere else, and have their 20TB raid. Otherwise, you could opt for much cheaper 8TB drives, as I have, and get 3 for a 24TB raid, as I have. I have two, in fact, one as a backup to the other. You can buy a 8TB archive drive for about $220. It’s a fast enough drive for almost anything, and when raided with two others, will push the SATA 3 limit. Mirror two, as I do, and you’ve got speed, capacity and safety. So even with this raid, unless you’re using it as a mirror, and so just getting 10TB from it, which I haven’t bothered looking into, as you might not be able to do that with this,  you still need two, one for backup.

    and 12TB drives have been out for a few months, though they’re still pretty expensive, and hard to get out of an enterprise sale volume purchase, but that will change shortly, as bigger drives come out later this year, or early next year.

    I checked. This does come with raid 0/1 support.
    Yup.  I think Seagate made a statement that they expect to reach 20TB or so on a single drive in the next 24 months or so.  

    Here it is 
    https://www.extremetech.com/computing/243530-seagate-plans-16tb-drives-2018-20tb-2020 ;

    Storage and Networking speeds are in alignment with the the ideal that enthusiasts will eschew streaming for media servers at home that have high quality versions of their content available locally.  I'm already hitting Comcast's bandwidth cap pretty regularly.
    This whole thing is confusing to many people. I have friends in my audio clubs that constantly ask me which NAS they should buy, when they have a network of one computer plus their phone. They just don’t understand most of this.
    hmurchison
  • Reply 18 of 33
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,508member

    jbdragon said:
    I have over 13TB on my NAS at home. That's with 6 3TB HDD's. This WD is using 2 10TB HDD to get 20TB. It's not going to be 20TB though. For one thing, wouldn't you want this at least in RAID1? At which point it makes this just over 9TB is size, not 20!!! If you want to risk losing all that Data, then stick with the Raid 0, and it's just acts as one big HDD. But it still only works out to 18.2TB of space, not 20TB.

    This is the whole HDD Manufactures calling a byte 1000, and Ram company's calling a byte 1024. Windows shows things at 1024. Does the Mac? When you get up into such large HDD sizes, that small difference add's up. Then you lose a little more space to formatting.

    My NAS is maxed out in drives, but I can go to larger HDD's. Just popping in 6TB HDD, I could jump my space to over 32TB in Raid5. If I went with the 10TB drives they are using, I could have 54.5TB of space.

    You should see my DVD, HD DVD and Blu-Ray collection. I have a lot of movies. Blu-Ray's really take up a lot of space fast. But it's nice ripping all my movies and putting them on my NAS and having PLEX serve them all up in any room in my house or away from my house. I can then throw the discs into my large binders as a last resort backup. Takes up a whole lot less space. Going 4K, which I haven't done yet, just makes it all that much worse.

    Remember the Disc changers in the past here it would hold like 100 Discs. You thought WOW. I'm so far past that. Using PLEX, I get all the info shown to me similar to Netflix. I have different users accounts. No more hunting around for a disc. So a lot of storage space is great. A raid is not a backup. It allows easy access to a large amount of Data at once. it should still be backed up! So really, if you want one of these 20TB WD units to put your Data on, you might as well buy 2 of them. One for your Data and one for the backup!
    The last thing I would worry about is MB vs MIB. When drives were small, it mattered that you knew. But it’s just the opposite of what you’re saying here, the larger they get, the less it matters.

    since we must keep at least 10% of a drive empty, another GB, or so that we know about, one way or the other on a multiple TB drive doesn’t mean anything. On an SSD, it’s worse, one should leave at the very least 15% open, and preferably 20%, particularly if that drive is being written to and files erased on a regular basis. So with a 1TB drive, a GB is just 0.1% of capacity, approximately, hardly noticeable. It’s really just semantics.

    but whether you use MB or MIB, the actual capacity is the same, and only desperate techies who are trying to prove their geek credentials argue the point.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 33
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,693member
    macxpress said:
    Who the hell needs 20TB of space? Thats a lot of stolen music and movies. 
    Anyone involved in video capture and editing for one.  I have have 24 TB of RAID 0 attached to my Mac at this moment.   That's for HD, now I have 4K who knows what will be required.
    edited August 2017 fastasleepwatto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 33
    RAID0 is fine till one of the drives goes bad. 
    Since these are RAID0 out of the box, if you need redundancy, you'll lose half of the advertised storage amount.
Sign In or Register to comment.