Apple's 'iPhone 8' rumored to top out at 7.5W for wireless charging

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  • Reply 81 of 123
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 11,683member

    avon b7 said:
    jdw said:
     I concur with those here who say Apple is reserving the 15W tech for the iPhone 9 so as to have something compelling for would-be buyers of the iPhone 9. ...
    ....

    Nope!   Apple didn't get where it is and it won't stay there by making marketing and sales it's #1 priority.   Apple is head and shoulders above the rest by making GREAT products.   (And sometimes "great" means a product that is stable, reliable and dependable rather than being merely bleeding edge.)
    The first MacBook Air was a perfect example of Apple trying to be bleeding edge and going too far. The machine lacked ports, was underpowered and very prone to having the GPU overheat. It was of course expensive.

     Later generations corrected some of those  issues.

    I lost count of the amount of graphics/video related issues they have had over the years. Sometimes with official repair programmes (that swap out faulty cards for identical ones with the same risk of failure) and sometimes without.

    Apple makes great products - but not always.
    Incorrect. The first Macbook Air was a perfect example of a first generation product that defined a new category and improved in further iterations and was copied by the knockoffs. You know, like Apple does with nearly everything. 

    Oh but yes, you’d expect the products to skip their natural lifecycle and just appear out of a clamshell fully formed and perfect on day 1. 
    netmagechiapscooter63tmayradarthekatmacky the mackywatto_cobra
  • Reply 82 of 123
    I think everyone is looking past the obvious. Regardless of power output the fact that Apple is deviating from the industry standard and developing what at this point appears to be yet another proprietary charger is unsettling..

    This is simply a ploy to make money. Apple customers won't be able to pick up a Qi pad for the low; probably won't be able to even use standard Qi pads. Instead apple users will likely pay a premium, since Apple will likely charge each manufacturer a licensing fee just to use their special "chip".

    Personally I think this is all BS, and I think I'm gonna grab that Note 8.
  • Reply 83 of 123
    macguimacgui Posts: 2,052member
    macky the macky said:
    Poor eyesight, and hand tremors that empty a fork before I can get it to my mouth... and I have no problems with the iPhone of iPad charging cables... you're making up problems where they don't occur...
    Again, the arrogance of one implying that he speaks for everyone. You are fortunate, apparently, that you haven't starved yet can easily manipulate charging cables.

    I know and work with many who have no such luck. And they resent offers of help (which I understand) but appreciate technological advances that help them in daily activities. Granted I'm not talking about prosthetic limbs, but small daily actions which give people some semblance of normality and lessen reminders of what they've lost or never had, compared to others around them.

    Yes, many people don't need a cellphone at all let alone wireless charging. But some do. And they improvise, adapt, and overcome. But if they don't have to, that's a good thing.

    If Apple brings wireless charging to the iPhone, I will appreciate the added convenience. While there will be those may stick to Lightning ports as their preference, I will also appreciate that some people's lives will be noticeably enhanced by a simple 'unnecessary' feature.
    Solichia
  • Reply 84 of 123
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 11,683member
    I think everyone is looking past the obvious. Regardless of power output the fact that Apple is deviating from the industry standard and developing what at this point appears to be yet another proprietary charger is unsettling..

    This is simply a ploy to make money. Apple customers won't be able to pick up a Qi pad for the low; probably won't be able to even use standard Qi pads. Instead apple users will likely pay a premium, since Apple will likely charge each manufacturer a licensing fee just to use their special "chip".

    Personally I think this is all BS, and I think I'm gonna grab that Note 8.
    Oh look, another one. 
    netmagechiapscooter63Rayz2016macky the mackywatto_cobra
  • Reply 85 of 123
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,031member
    macgui said:
    Huge difference between wireless and inductive. There’s not a whole lot of difference between plugging a phone in and laying it on a specific place on a table to charge. 
    What, a few inches? A few feet? I'd think that without the principle of induction, wireless charging as we now know it wouldn't be possible. Not huge, really, though I could be wrong.
    I wonder if the same people saying how inefficient inductive charging is over wired are also the same people who are yammering for longer range wireless charging. 

    I appreciate power windows in my car. Some here may not know the experience of hand-crank windows, or even the one-tap down for power windows. I had to live without for years. 'Oh, the humanity' you reply. Yes, first world 'problem' but I love that feature. Same auto on/auto off headlights.Same with auto-on windshield wipers. Oh and auto-on headlights when using wipers. (State law, nice not to have to think about compliance- it's automatic.) Then there's home automation with sensors to turn control my lights with my mere movement, not even having to 'tell' them what to do. And all this while maintaining a low BMI.
    Good example about the car windows and other convenience features when the simpler/cheaper/older options "weren't that difficult."

    So the act of placing my Watch on a charging stand vs plugging in a Lightning cable is appreciated. How much energy is wasted? Don't know, don't care. Walking into my office or coming home, the mere act of setting my phone down on a mat without even so much breaking stride appeals to me, as does picking it up off the mat as I leave. Convenience. Some find it overrated. Fine. But they can take their arrogance of telling me I don't need it and shove it up their tight ass.
    I had a tough time getting the Watch to charge on a train to go see the eclipse last week. Next time I'll bring some scotch tape on pieces of wax paper (unless I can think of a simpler solution). I have the original 6' cable so I just loosened my watch strap and slid the inductive charge between the watch and my wrist. It is magnetic, but it was too weak for the typical bumps on the train.

    Let's not even consider how inductive over plug-in power has helped people with physical impairments lead a more 'normal' life with dignity. Watching people struggle with what we see as a 'what's so difficult' task of plug-in a cable is a little painful. Or maybe not at all for some people. 
    I know I use two hands to plug in my iPhone to a loose Lightning cable yet I can connect my Watch with only one hand and with less focus, which is helpful considering it's the first thing I put on in the morning and the last thing I take off at night. I can't imagine how people with one arm or hand get by.

    But we heard the same thing about the iPod Dock Connector. It was small enough. It was good enough. Being reversible isn't that big a deal for Lightning, and that it was too small that it was actually worse than the 30-pin connector.


    PS: If Apple adopts the Qi standard we could see universal inductive charging become standard. No need to have various cables for different devices. Perhaps we'll even see this become common in automobiles. Is there another standard that isn't compatible with Qi? Could/Would Apple have the device do a handshake with the charging pad to make sure it's authorized? Could I then travel with just the Watch charger so long as I have plenty of time for the iPhone to get a trickle charge?

    edited August 2017 macky the macky
  • Reply 86 of 123
    macguimacgui Posts: 2,052member
    foggyhill said:
    Inductive is wireless, the range is just really small.   Induction is what happens when pulsating electromagnetic wave hit a conductor and move some electrons, that can happen at short distances (like a stovetop and Qi) or long distance if you're talking about antennas.

    Sending power is always a iffy thing because it decreases at the inverse square root of distance, which requires some a very directed beam or beams to get the power to destination with minimum loss.  But what if the target zone is moving, the receiving antenna is changing orientation? Well, that's even more complexity.

     Of course, that power then has to go through the air or maybe people, which has its own big issues; using things like interference patterns and you could in theory create some small spots with much higher power when everywhere else has less. Having it adaptive could ensure the transmitter sending power to your phone is the closest ( a bit like cell phone handoff)..

    So, overall complexity of fully wireless system seems pretty high and advantages well, not that high, how many watts are you getting into your phone then? If the phone is not in use, say in your pocket or sitting anywhere in the room then it could replenish it with a few watts. A better use would be for the watch that now would never need to be charged ever for most people.
    QED
  • Reply 87 of 123
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,031member
    I love all the lemmings who defend everything Apple does no matter what. You are paying ridiculous 50 percent profit margins, maybe more people should be critical of your wall gardened overpriced outdated technology 
    I like trolls who plop out their pamphlets of tired, boring, incorrect talking points while offering nothing of value whatsoever. Please your hearts. 
    What's odd about such comments on a rumour is that to defend Apple would be to suggest what they're doing today is the best and always will be the best, not to say that you'd like to see the technology move forward.
    chia
  • Reply 88 of 123
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 5,933member
    Soli said:
    avon b7 said:
    jdw said:
     I concur with those here who say Apple is reserving the 15W tech for the iPhone 9 so as to have something compelling for would-be buyers of the iPhone 9. ...
    ....

    Nope!   Apple didn't get where it is and it won't stay there by making marketing and sales it's #1 priority.   Apple is head and shoulders above the rest by making GREAT products.   (And sometimes "great" means a product that is stable, reliable and dependable rather than being merely bleeding edge.)
    The first MacBook Air was a perfect example of Apple trying to be bleeding edge and going too far. The machine lacked ports, was underpowered and very prone to having the GPU overheat. It was of course expensive.

     Later generations corrected some of those  issues.

    I lost count of the amount of graphics/video related issues they have had over the years. Sometimes with official repair programmes (that swap out faulty cards for identical ones with the same risk of failure) and sometimes without.

    Apple makes great products - but not always.
    1) It was bleeding edge, hence the cost. Intel dusted off an entire class of ultra-low power CPU that it previously had no way of marketing. There was nothing about that machine that was designed to fleece buyers. Being slower than other Intel processors doesn't mean that the cost is lower.

    2) While no MacBook Air has ever suited my needs it's a stretch to say that it wasn't a great product for its target market. R&D from that product category has permeated throughout Apple's design ethos and created an entirely new class of notebooks called Ultrabooks that waved by Apple's MBA. Despite all the bitching about not having an ODD you're hard pressed to find any notebook today that comes with an ODD.
    But had they waited for around a year they would have largely hit the ground running instead of having a machine that was anything but stable, reliable and dependable.

    Trying to push the envelope led them to produce a new niche segment through a machine that really wasn't ready for roll out.

    I have one through need because I happened to be a perfect target for its use as a secondary unit. It isn't the first generation and still works great and wasn't overpriced.
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 89 of 123
    macguimacgui Posts: 2,052member
    Soli said:
    I had a tough time getting the Watch to charge on a train to go see the eclipse last week. Next time I'll bring some scotch tape on pieces of wax paper (unless I can think of a simpler solution).
    You might try a small rubber band or silicone band around the Watch and charger, tight enough to keep them together but not so tight as to activate the Side button. You adapted, but there's nothing wrong with not having to. A train ride to see the eclipse would be a win-win for this CA boy.



    But we heard the same thing about the iPod Dock Connector. It was small enough. It was good enough. Being reversible isn't that big a deal for Lightning, and that it was too small that it was actually worse than the 30-pin connector.
    Geeze it was infuriating to hear people say that. Yes, the dock connector was once good enough. But while taking it for granted 99% of the time, I renew my appreciation for the Lightning connector every time I plug in my iPod Classic and iPad 2. My girlfriend just gave up her 3GS for a 7 and loves the Lightning connector.

    Don't get me started on USB and especially micro-USB. My hands don't shake and visual acuity is very good, and I still hate micro-USB. As you might guess, I'm a BIG fan of USB-C.
    edited August 2017 Solinetmagepscooter63watto_cobra
  • Reply 90 of 123
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 5,933member

    avon b7 said:
    jdw said:
     I concur with those here who say Apple is reserving the 15W tech for the iPhone 9 so as to have something compelling for would-be buyers of the iPhone 9. ...
    ....

    Nope!   Apple didn't get where it is and it won't stay there by making marketing and sales it's #1 priority.   Apple is head and shoulders above the rest by making GREAT products.   (And sometimes "great" means a product that is stable, reliable and dependable rather than being merely bleeding edge.)
    The first MacBook Air was a perfect example of Apple trying to be bleeding edge and going too far. The machine lacked ports, was underpowered and very prone to having the GPU overheat. It was of course expensive.

     Later generations corrected some of those  issues.

    I lost count of the amount of graphics/video related issues they have had over the years. Sometimes with official repair programmes (that swap out faulty cards for identical ones with the same risk of failure) and sometimes without.

    Apple makes great products - but not always.
    Incorrect. The first Macbook Air was a perfect example of a first generation product that defined a new category and improved in further iterations and was copied by the knockoffs. You know, like Apple does with nearly everything. 

    Oh but yes, you’d expect the products to skip their natural lifecycle and just appear out of a clamshell fully formed and perfect on day 1. 

    Yes, although perfection at first shot isn't a realistic goal, I would prefer that, unless issues can be corrected via firmware/software updates and even then I'd hope for a very good reason for releasing a product that wasn't ready for release. That was exactly the case with the first generation MBA.

    Wasn't it you who claimed Apple didn't release half-baked products? ;-)
  • Reply 91 of 123
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,031member
    avon b7 said:

    avon b7 said:
    jdw said:
     I concur with those here who say Apple is reserving the 15W tech for the iPhone 9 so as to have something compelling for would-be buyers of the iPhone 9. ...
    ....

    Nope!   Apple didn't get where it is and it won't stay there by making marketing and sales it's #1 priority.   Apple is head and shoulders above the rest by making GREAT products.   (And sometimes "great" means a product that is stable, reliable and dependable rather than being merely bleeding edge.)
    The first MacBook Air was a perfect example of Apple trying to be bleeding edge and going too far. The machine lacked ports, was underpowered and very prone to having the GPU overheat. It was of course expensive.

     Later generations corrected some of those  issues.

    I lost count of the amount of graphics/video related issues they have had over the years. Sometimes with official repair programmes (that swap out faulty cards for identical ones with the same risk of failure) and sometimes without.

    Apple makes great products - but not always.
    Incorrect. The first Macbook Air was a perfect example of a first generation product that defined a new category and improved in further iterations and was copied by the knockoffs. You know, like Apple does with nearly everything. 

    Oh but yes, you’d expect the products to skip their natural lifecycle and just appear out of a clamshell fully formed and perfect on day 1. 

    Yes, although perfection at first shot isn't a realistic goal, I would prefer that, unless issues can be corrected via firmware/software updates and even then I'd hope for a very good reason for releasing a product that wasn't ready for release. That was exactly the case with the first generation MBA.

    Wasn't it you who claimed Apple didn't release half-baked products? ;-)
    1) Is it half-baked or bleeding edge? Sure, it could be both, but being one doesn't mean it's the other, and considering that the MBA has lasted for nearly a decade it's hard to see how that was a foolish product category for Apple to invest in. For me, that would've been a foolish investment just as the iPad will likely never suit my computing needs when I have a MBP and iPhone, but that doesn't mean the the iPad is half-baked simply because it would be foolish for me to use as my primary computing device.

    2) Per your previous comment, waiting another year wouldn't have been enough time for Intel to increase the performance of their CULV chips. 
    netmagewatto_cobra
  • Reply 92 of 123
    Fast charging is bad for the battery anyways, making it more difficult (wired) to charge at higher power is a good idea.
    baconstang
  • Reply 93 of 123
    foggyhill said:
    There is probably an engineering reason like say size of space in the smaller phone than competition and also capacity to dissipate heat. Cause any wave not converted into power becomes heat.

    Could it also be because of health regulation reasons?  Could it be that if Apple had wanted to push the charging power to say 15W, it would require more/longer testing for FDA/EU/etc agencies?  I don't know if there actually are dangers regarding inductive/other-wireless charging (too much effort to wade through all the maybe-BS/actual-BS on the i-net), but I know there is concern.

    The typical use-case for a lot (most?) users will just be to put the phone on the pad at night on while at the office - for at least a few hours/tens of minutes at a time.  So it isn't really necessary to have super-fast charging, except for the "street-cred": "And one more thing we're sure you'll just LOVE!  If you're music ever craps out on you while you're lying in your bed listening to Death Metal and destroying your hearing with your brand-new AirPods?  You can charge your iPhone with only *5 minutes* on your brand-new Apple iPhone(**)/Apple Watch(***)/AirPod-Case(****) charging station!  Yours for the bargain price of only $88.49.

    (*) Available in about 4-6 months.  (**) Only works with iPhone 8++. (***) Works best with Apple Watch 3.0, available 3 months after our next event. (****) Only AirPods case 2.0.
    tmay
  • Reply 94 of 123
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,957member
    kitatit said:
    jdw said:
     I concur with those here who say Apple is reserving the 15W tech for the iPhone 9 so as to have something compelling for would-be buyers of the iPhone 9. Seriously, those of us who have been Apple enthusiasts since the 1980s know Apple very well. This is nothing new.  Apple has long put "old tech" in their devices so as to make more money and to compel people to upgrade when the next "latest and greatest" Apple device comes out. And that is precisely why Power Computing other Mac clone makers were so successful in taking away business from Apple when Apple decided to license macOS in the 1990s. It was because those clone makers departed from Apple's strategy and instead put modern technology in their devices, along with greater expandability and upgradability, which is what the lured customers away from Apple's comparatively sub par machines.  Even though Apple had a better industrial design than those clone makers, customers flocked to the clone makers because of faster performance, more ports, and better overall hardware functionality. 

    All of this means that if Apple would start giving people more value in Macs, they would have even more success than they have now.  Macs have always been expensive, but in the past at least we Mac lovers could say that we were getting our money's worth. I'm not so sure we can really say that anymore about modern Macs, perhaps with the exception of the iMac alone. 

    This truth will of course piss off all of the "Apple is always right and never wrong, let's worship Apple" people in this forum.  But truth is truth.  If Apple were to license macOS today, a clone maker would probably come out with a 17 inch MacBook Pro that offers not only all of the functionality 15 inch MacBook Pro offers, but also restore everything Apple gutted from the 2015 edition.   And they would probably sell quite well even if some could argue that Apple's manufacturing precision and design aesthetic were comparatively better.  

    Windows lovers would try to argue that we can get all of that now simply by turning the Windows, but that's like a Jedi turning to the Darkside. We who love macOS are sticking with macOS.  We simply long for a greater value in the machines that we buy which run MacOS, which means we want more functionality, not less. And that doesn't mean more functionality from "a universal port that requires numerous dongles that likely will be forgotten at home."  I'm happy to have those new USBC ports so long as we have at least one of the old USBA ports onboard too. And let us not forget the beloved SD card slot either. 
    I absolutely agree jdw. I bought a Power Computing  clone back in the day for those reasons. Apple lost the plot around MacOS 9 and it became a crash monster. I then had a Sharp notebook for 7yrs. I'm still running a 2008 unibody 15" MacBook Pro now. It was good value then. But now I just can't stomach the current prices. Here in Australia I noticed a big surge in people buying MacBooks in 2008-2010 as the value was there.

    I buy Apple products because I see the value in the total cost of ownership and the experience, not because I'm rich. 

    I honestly can't see myself changing from iOS but when my old timer Mac eventually becomes totally unusable, cough, choke, it's not a certainty that I'll buy another Mac.

    Have fun with your Dell, and Windows. why that’s a better options then an imac i still fail to understand, despite this familiar “Apple is greedy!” trope. Meanwhile, I get what I pay for. Good value doesn’t mean cheap. 

    I have to use a Dell Windows laptop for work and am continually amazed at how much it sucks at even the most basic tasks, like going to sleep.
    You know what? Sometimes it's a very simple thing. 

    My MacBook Pro is very light, yet I can lift the lid with one hand, and the base doesn't lift from desk. 

    I try the same with my Dell, and the whole laptop moves up with the lid. 
    netmageSolibaconstangpscooter63macky the mackywatto_cobra
  • Reply 95 of 123
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,957member
    I love all the lemmings who defend everything Apple does no matter what. You are paying ridiculous 50 percent profit margins, maybe more people should be critical of your wall gardened overpriced outdated technology 
    And here you are; so insecure with your choice of Android that you skulk around the internet trolling for validation. 
    baconstangpscooter63tmayradarthekatjax44watto_cobra
  • Reply 96 of 123
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,031member
    Rayz2016 said:
    kitatit said:
    jdw said:
     I concur with those here who say Apple is reserving the 15W tech for the iPhone 9 so as to have something compelling for would-be buyers of the iPhone 9. Seriously, those of us who have been Apple enthusiasts since the 1980s know Apple very well. This is nothing new.  Apple has long put "old tech" in their devices so as to make more money and to compel people to upgrade when the next "latest and greatest" Apple device comes out. And that is precisely why Power Computing other Mac clone makers were so successful in taking away business from Apple when Apple decided to license macOS in the 1990s. It was because those clone makers departed from Apple's strategy and instead put modern technology in their devices, along with greater expandability and upgradability, which is what the lured customers away from Apple's comparatively sub par machines.  Even though Apple had a better industrial design than those clone makers, customers flocked to the clone makers because of faster performance, more ports, and better overall hardware functionality. 

    All of this means that if Apple would start giving people more value in Macs, they would have even more success than they have now.  Macs have always been expensive, but in the past at least we Mac lovers could say that we were getting our money's worth. I'm not so sure we can really say that anymore about modern Macs, perhaps with the exception of the iMac alone. 

    This truth will of course piss off all of the "Apple is always right and never wrong, let's worship Apple" people in this forum.  But truth is truth.  If Apple were to license macOS today, a clone maker would probably come out with a 17 inch MacBook Pro that offers not only all of the functionality 15 inch MacBook Pro offers, but also restore everything Apple gutted from the 2015 edition.   And they would probably sell quite well even if some could argue that Apple's manufacturing precision and design aesthetic were comparatively better.  

    Windows lovers would try to argue that we can get all of that now simply by turning the Windows, but that's like a Jedi turning to the Darkside. We who love macOS are sticking with macOS.  We simply long for a greater value in the machines that we buy which run MacOS, which means we want more functionality, not less. And that doesn't mean more functionality from "a universal port that requires numerous dongles that likely will be forgotten at home."  I'm happy to have those new USBC ports so long as we have at least one of the old USBA ports onboard too. And let us not forget the beloved SD card slot either. 
    I absolutely agree jdw. I bought a Power Computing  clone back in the day for those reasons. Apple lost the plot around MacOS 9 and it became a crash monster. I then had a Sharp notebook for 7yrs. I'm still running a 2008 unibody 15" MacBook Pro now. It was good value then. But now I just can't stomach the current prices. Here in Australia I noticed a big surge in people buying MacBooks in 2008-2010 as the value was there.

    I buy Apple products because I see the value in the total cost of ownership and the experience, not because I'm rich. 

    I honestly can't see myself changing from iOS but when my old timer Mac eventually becomes totally unusable, cough, choke, it's not a certainty that I'll buy another Mac.

    Have fun with your Dell, and Windows. why that’s a better options then an imac i still fail to understand, despite this familiar “Apple is greedy!” trope. Meanwhile, I get what I pay for. Good value doesn’t mean cheap. 

    I have to use a Dell Windows laptop for work and am continually amazed at how much it sucks at even the most basic tasks, like going to sleep.
    You know what? Sometimes it's a very simple thing. 

    My MacBook Pro is very light, yet I can lift the lid with one hand, and the base doesn't lift from desk. 

    I try the same with my Dell, and the whole laptop moves up with the lid. 
    And then there's the longevity of the display hinge. Apple is the only company I know of that can have the lid mechanism work that perfectly for many years without any evidence of loosening. How much extra R&D does this cost? What is the cost for the hinge components? What kind of variance is allowed so that this works so well with the given weights of the base and lid? Regardless of whether it's high or low it seems that only Apple is willing to make this investment.
    baconstangpscooter63macky the mackywatto_cobra
  • Reply 97 of 123
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,031member
    Rayz2016 said:
    I love all the lemmings who defend everything Apple does no matter what. You are paying ridiculous 50 percent profit margins, maybe more people should be critical of your wall gardened overpriced outdated technology 
    And here you are; so insecure with your choice of Android that you skulk around the internet trolling for validation. 
    Gotta love that argument that if a company is efficient and well managed (i.e.: earning a profit) that the customer is being taken advantage of. One day maybe he'll realize that it doesn't matter that if a company is selling cheap Android phones at a loss that doesn't mean they're altruistic, that you're getting a bargain, or that it's more bang for your buck.
    baconstangpscooter63tmaywatto_cobra
  • Reply 98 of 123
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 5,933member
    Soli said:
    avon b7 said:

    avon b7 said:
    jdw said:
     I concur with those here who say Apple is reserving the 15W tech for the iPhone 9 so as to have something compelling for would-be buyers of the iPhone 9. ...
    ....

    Nope!   Apple didn't get where it is and it won't stay there by making marketing and sales it's #1 priority.   Apple is head and shoulders above the rest by making GREAT products.   (And sometimes "great" means a product that is stable, reliable and dependable rather than being merely bleeding edge.)
    The first MacBook Air was a perfect example of Apple trying to be bleeding edge and going too far. The machine lacked ports, was underpowered and very prone to having the GPU overheat. It was of course expensive.

     Later generations corrected some of those  issues.

    I lost count of the amount of graphics/video related issues they have had over the years. Sometimes with official repair programmes (that swap out faulty cards for identical ones with the same risk of failure) and sometimes without.

    Apple makes great products - but not always.
    Incorrect. The first Macbook Air was a perfect example of a first generation product that defined a new category and improved in further iterations and was copied by the knockoffs. You know, like Apple does with nearly everything. 

    Oh but yes, you’d expect the products to skip their natural lifecycle and just appear out of a clamshell fully formed and perfect on day 1. 

    Yes, although perfection at first shot isn't a realistic goal, I would prefer that, unless issues can be corrected via firmware/software updates and even then I'd hope for a very good reason for releasing a product that wasn't ready for release. That was exactly the case with the first generation MBA.

    Wasn't it you who claimed Apple didn't release half-baked products? ;-)
    1) Is it half-baked or bleeding edge? Sure, it could be both, but being one doesn't mean it's the other, and considering that the MBA has lasted for nearly a decade it's hard to see how that was a foolish product category for Apple to invest in. For me, that would've been a foolish investment just as the iPad will likely never suit my computing needs when I have a MBP and iPhone, but that doesn't mean the the iPad is half-baked simply because it would be foolish for me to use as my primary computing device.

    2) Per your previous comment, waiting another year wouldn't have been enough time for Intel to increase the performance of their CULV chips. 
    When a machine can easily overheat and shutdown it doesn't matter how bleeding edge it is. It shouldn't ship.

    A year after release the overheating issues were more or less under control from a hardware perspective. If I remember correctly it was actually less.

    I never mentioned the segment was foolish to enter, just not when they did. That was the point in response to the OPs claim.

    I have a MBA and I'm quite pleased with it.

    iPad was different as it largely hit the ground running and served its core purpose. It wasn't right for me at launch but when the Mini 2 arrived it was perfect timing for me. I didn't like the large size of the original as it wasn't nice for me to lug around or hold and was largely a 'passive' device (although fine for those whose needs it served). Also, by most estimations, it was competively priced at launch.

    I LOVE the Mini 2. It has been rock solid even if it is stuck on iOS 8.2.


  • Reply 99 of 123
    jcs2305jcs2305 Posts: 1,220member
    foggyhill said:
    jcs2305 said:
    gerard said:
    My experience of using the iPad charger on my 7+ was it does charge faster but it also loses the charge faster. When I use the supplied charger; it did take longer to charge but the battery life was much better. 
    I use a 12w iPad charger for my 7 plus daily, or every other day depending on usage. I have never had an issue of the phone discharging faster because I used a larger charger. You probably should take it it into the Apple store to be looked at or replaced.  
    Faster charging DOES damage a battery over time quicker than using a lower wattage, that's a fact cause well it is chemistry, there is no way around it really.
    Current density, heat and how much the battery is fully charged or discharged when used or charged are the biggest factors in their longevity (all those factors are linked.


    Just how much depends on how the battery is constructed, what kind of algorithm is used to modulate the charging,
    how heat is evacuated, is the battery used during charging, is the bigger charge plugged in when the phone is at 10% or 50%, is the phone charged in hot weather or poorly ventilated areas and how many full cycles it has already been through.

    If the fast charging algorythm limits fast charging in the 30%-70% range and responds to heat (slowing down charging in hotter conditions), that damage will be relatively low.

    A phone with less heat being evacuated and much more charging cycles than an ipad is more susceptible to eventually degrade the battery.
    That's likely why they ship the Iphone with the smaller charger. Apple knows this is what gives a longer longevity to the battery.

    In a bigger vehicule like a car, they can mitigate this by basically split up the battery in many many parts to limit current density and make heat dissipation less of an issue; though considering what fast charging means for a car, it obviously still is as any owners of those cars will attest.


    The OP wasn't talking about damage over time. The OP suggested that during normal charging and usage on an IPhone 7 plus, the battery discharged fast than it had when the same phone was charged using the supplied smaller charger.  I then  provided my experience of not having that same issue when using the larger 12w charger, or the smaller 5w charger with the same phone. I use a 128gb iPhone 7 Plus just to be clear. 


  • Reply 100 of 123
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,470member
    avon b7 said:
    Soli said:
    avon b7 said:

    avon b7 said:
    jdw said:
     I concur with those here who say Apple is reserving the 15W tech for the iPhone 9 so as to have something compelling for would-be buyers of the iPhone 9. ...
    ....

    Nope!   Apple didn't get where it is and it won't stay there by making marketing and sales it's #1 priority.   Apple is head and shoulders above the rest by making GREAT products.   (And sometimes "great" means a product that is stable, reliable and dependable rather than being merely bleeding edge.)
    The first MacBook Air was a perfect example of Apple trying to be bleeding edge and going too far. The machine lacked ports, was underpowered and very prone to having the GPU overheat. It was of course expensive.

     Later generations corrected some of those  issues.

    I lost count of the amount of graphics/video related issues they have had over the years. Sometimes with official repair programmes (that swap out faulty cards for identical ones with the same risk of failure) and sometimes without.

    Apple makes great products - but not always.
    Incorrect. The first Macbook Air was a perfect example of a first generation product that defined a new category and improved in further iterations and was copied by the knockoffs. You know, like Apple does with nearly everything. 

    Oh but yes, you’d expect the products to skip their natural lifecycle and just appear out of a clamshell fully formed and perfect on day 1. 

    Yes, although perfection at first shot isn't a realistic goal, I would prefer that, unless issues can be corrected via firmware/software updates and even then I'd hope for a very good reason for releasing a product that wasn't ready for release. That was exactly the case with the first generation MBA.

    Wasn't it you who claimed Apple didn't release half-baked products? ;-)
    1) Is it half-baked or bleeding edge? Sure, it could be both, but being one doesn't mean it's the other, and considering that the MBA has lasted for nearly a decade it's hard to see how that was a foolish product category for Apple to invest in. For me, that would've been a foolish investment just as the iPad will likely never suit my computing needs when I have a MBP and iPhone, but that doesn't mean the the iPad is half-baked simply because it would be foolish for me to use as my primary computing device.

    2) Per your previous comment, waiting another year wouldn't have been enough time for Intel to increase the performance of their CULV chips. 
    When a machine can easily overheat and shutdown it doesn't matter how bleeding edge it is. It shouldn't ship.

    A year after release the overheating issues were more or less under control from a hardware perspective. If I remember correctly it was actually less.

    I never mentioned the segment was foolish to enter, just not when they did. That was the point in response to the OPs claim.

    I have a MBA and I'm quite pleased with it.

    iPad was different as it largely hit the ground running and served its core purpose. It wasn't right for me at launch but when the Mini 2 arrived it was perfect timing for me. I didn't like the large size of the original as it wasn't nice for me to lug around or hold and was largely a 'passive' device (although fine for those whose needs it served). Also, by most estimations, it was competively priced at launch.

    I LOVE the Mini 2. It has been rock solid even if it is stuck on iOS 8.2.


    Then why don't you download and install 10.3.3 (or is the non-Retina version not able to update?)
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