Up to 143M US consumers exposed in Equifax hack, could impact iPhone buyers

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Comments

  • Reply 20 of 85
    Yep...just went to their dedicated website. Watched CEO video. Checked to see if 'compromised' and told to enroll for free credit reporting. Texted members of my family to check with website link.


    Daughter reported doesn't work on iPhone 7! Ugh! Tried on my Se and it doesn't work. Worked on my 2017 MacBook tho.

  • Reply 22 of 85

    I just checked mine, and it said they believe my personal info was at risk. So, they do tell if that is the case.
    Me too. Enrollment date is 9/12.
  • Reply 23 of 85
    AI please stay on top of this. Did the top 3 execs dump stock and does the enrollment nullify rights of customer? Thx .

    Solilongpath
  • Reply 24 of 85
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,858member
    I'm not seeing that. I put in my surname, the last 6 of my SSN, and clicked the box to prove I'm not a robot. I don't recall agreeing to anything else.
    longpathStrangeDays
  • Reply 25 of 85
    sog35 said:
    this is ridiculous.

    These companies make BILLIONS using our data and personal information for free.

    The least they could do is safeguard it.
    Yeah, but that costs money (profits).
  • Reply 26 of 85
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,616member
    sog35 said:
    this is ridiculous.

    These companies make BILLIONS using our data and personal information for free.

    The least they could do is safeguard it.
    Using it? EQUIFAX SELLS IT!
    longpath
  • Reply 27 of 85
    Soli said:
    I'm not seeing that. I put in my surname, the last 6 of my SSN, and clicked the box to prove I'm not a robot. I don't recall agreeing to anything else.
    It's there. You agree to waive your rights using the website. When you go to the site to check if you were affected, there is terms of service section on the bottom. When you click on the terms of service, read section 4. 

    https://www.equifaxsecurity2017.com/potential-impact/
    baconstangmagman1979
  • Reply 28 of 85
    lkrupp said:
    Hopefully there will be a massive class action brought against Equifax. We should be compensated for the fear, uncertainty, and doubt this we will have to deal with. If our identities are stolen Equifax should be forced to fix it and compensate us even more. We're not dealing with some retailer who's data was hacked. This is one of the largest credit reporting agencies in the world and has data on us that no retailer would ever have. Equifax needs to pay dearly for its incompetence. The CEO can start off by resigning. Imagine the financial carnage this will cause. You want to buy a new car, or home, or iMac Pro, and your credit rating is in shambles.
    FYI if you sign up for their free monitoring service you also WAIVE YOUR RIGHT TO SUE THEM. 
  • Reply 29 of 85
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,858member
    Soli said:
    I'm not seeing that. I put in my surname, the last 6 of my SSN, and clicked the box to prove I'm not a robot. I don't recall agreeing to anything else.
    It's there. You agree to waive your rights using the website. When you go to the site to check if you were affected, there is terms of service section on the bottom. When you click on the terms of service, read section 4. 

    https://www.equifaxsecurity2017.com/potential-impact/
    I looked it over but I’m not seeing It. Can you not simply copy the sentence or paragraph that states my rights are waived by simply “using the website” without even signing up for the service or agreeing to their terms of service?

    Can you also explain how “using the website” legally binds you to anything? That seems easily defeatable.
    edited September 2017 StrangeDays
  • Reply 30 of 85
    Soli said:
    Soli said:
    I'm not seeing that. I put in my surname, the last 6 of my SSN, and clicked the box to prove I'm not a robot. I don't recall agreeing to anything else.
    It's there. You agree to waive your rights using the website. When you go to the site to check if you were affected, there is terms of service section on the bottom. When you click on the terms of service, read section 4. 

    https://www.equifaxsecurity2017.com/potential-impact/
    I looked it over but I’m not seeing what you say exists. Can you not simply copy the sentence or paragraph that stated that says my rights are waived by simply “using the website” without even signing up for the service or agreeing to their terms of service? Can you also explain how “using the website” legally binds you to anything?
    It says this right at the top:

    What are the Terms of Use for Equifax?


    Below you will find our Product Terms of Use and the Site Terms of Use when using the Equifax website. You can also review our Privacy Policy, which provides information regarding our handling of any personal information that you may provide to us.

    On section 4, it says this:

    AGREEMENT TO RESOLVE ALL DISPUTES BY BINDING INDIVIDUAL ARBITRATION. PLEASE READ THIS ENTIRE SECTION CAREFULLY BECAUSE IT AFFECTS YOUR LEGAL RIGHTS BY REQUIRING ARBITRATION OF DISPUTES (EXCEPT AS SET FORTH BELOW) AND A WAIVER OF THE ABILITY TO BRING OR PARTICIPATE IN A CLASS ACTION, CLASS ARBITRATION, OR OTHER REPRESENTATIVE ACTION. ARBITRATION PROVIDES A QUICK AND COST EFFECTIVE MECHANISM FOR RESOLVING DISPUTES, BUT YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT IT ALSO LIMITS YOUR RIGHTS TO DISCOVERY AND APPEAL.

    I don't see how this would hold up in court if you are just simply checking to see if you were affected by the data breach. Signing up for the service, that could hold up in court. 
    longpath
  • Reply 31 of 85
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,858member
    Soli said:
    Soli said:
    I'm not seeing that. I put in my surname, the last 6 of my SSN, and clicked the box to prove I'm not a robot. I don't recall agreeing to anything else.
    It's there. You agree to waive your rights using the website. When you go to the site to check if you were affected, there is terms of service section on the bottom. When you click on the terms of service, read section 4. 

    https://www.equifaxsecurity2017.com/potential-impact/
    I looked it over but I’m not seeing what you say exists. Can you not simply copy the sentence or paragraph that stated that says my rights are waived by simply “using the website” without even signing up for the service or agreeing to their terms of service? Can you also explain how “using the website” legally binds you to anything?
    It says this right at the top:

    What are the Terms of Use for Equifax?


    Below you will find our Product Terms of Use and the Site Terms of Use when using the Equifax website. You can also review our Privacy Policy, which provides information regarding our handling of any personal information that you may provide to us.

    On section 4, it says this:

    AGREEMENT TO RESOLVE ALL DISPUTES BY BINDING INDIVIDUAL ARBITRATION. PLEASE READ THIS ENTIRE SECTION CAREFULLY BECAUSE IT AFFECTS YOUR LEGAL RIGHTS BY REQUIRING ARBITRATION OF DISPUTES (EXCEPT AS SET FORTH BELOW) AND A WAIVER OF THE ABILITY TO BRING OR PARTICIPATE IN A CLASS ACTION, CLASS ARBITRATION, OR OTHER REPRESENTATIVE ACTION. ARBITRATION PROVIDES A QUICK AND COST EFFECTIVE MECHANISM FOR RESOLVING DISPUTES, BUT YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT IT ALSO LIMITS YOUR RIGHTS TO DISCOVERY AND APPEAL.

    I don't see how this would hold up in court if you are just simply checking to see if you were affected by the data breach. Signing up for the service, that could hold up in court. 
    Where does it say this? Why can’t you simply quote the sentence that says “using the website” protects them from being sued even without ever agreeing to their terms of service?
    longpath
  • Reply 32 of 85
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,616member
    sog35 said:
    Soli said:
    I'm not seeing that. I put in my surname, the last 6 of my SSN, and clicked the box to prove I'm not a robot. I don't recall agreeing to anything else.
    It's there. You agree to waive your rights using the website. When you go to the site to check if you were affected, there is terms of service section on the bottom. When you click on the terms of service, read section 4. 

    https://www.equifaxsecurity2017.com/potential-impact/
    that bullshit won't hold up in court.

    regardless I would not even waste my time with this company
    You have no choice in the matter. They have your financial information, your family dynamics, your employment  history, every address you've lived at, where you went to school, a history of every loan and a record of every credit card. And you can't opt out. 
    longpath
  • Reply 33 of 85
    Soli said:
    Soli said:
    Soli said:
    I'm not seeing that. I put in my surname, the last 6 of my SSN, and clicked the box to prove I'm not a robot. I don't recall agreeing to anything else.
    It's there. You agree to waive your rights using the website. When you go to the site to check if you were affected, there is terms of service section on the bottom. When you click on the terms of service, read section 4. 

    https://www.equifaxsecurity2017.com/potential-impact/
    I looked it over but I’m not seeing what you say exists. Can you not simply copy the sentence or paragraph that stated that says my rights are waived by simply “using the website” without even signing up for the service or agreeing to their terms of service? Can you also explain how “using the website” legally binds you to anything?
    It says this right at the top:

    What are the Terms of Use for Equifax?


    Below you will find our Product Terms of Use and the Site Terms of Use when using the Equifax website. You can also review our Privacy Policy, which provides information regarding our handling of any personal information that you may provide to us.

    On section 4, it says this:

    AGREEMENT TO RESOLVE ALL DISPUTES BY BINDING INDIVIDUAL ARBITRATION. PLEASE READ THIS ENTIRE SECTION CAREFULLY BECAUSE IT AFFECTS YOUR LEGAL RIGHTS BY REQUIRING ARBITRATION OF DISPUTES (EXCEPT AS SET FORTH BELOW) AND A WAIVER OF THE ABILITY TO BRING OR PARTICIPATE IN A CLASS ACTION, CLASS ARBITRATION, OR OTHER REPRESENTATIVE ACTION. ARBITRATION PROVIDES A QUICK AND COST EFFECTIVE MECHANISM FOR RESOLVING DISPUTES, BUT YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT IT ALSO LIMITS YOUR RIGHTS TO DISCOVERY AND APPEAL.

    I don't see how this would hold up in court if you are just simply checking to see if you were affected by the data breach. Signing up for the service, that could hold up in court. 
    Where does it say this? Why can’t you simply quote the sentence that says “using the website” protects them from being sued even without ever agreeing to their terms of service?
    It doesn't say that flat out but that's what it means reading the terms. You are agreeing to the terms of the website by using it. Terms of service on websites are enforceable. You technically don't have to agree to anything either. Legally enforcing the terms is another issue though. 
  • Reply 34 of 85
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,858member
    Soli said:
    Soli said:
    Soli said:
    I'm not seeing that. I put in my surname, the last 6 of my SSN, and clicked the box to prove I'm not a robot. I don't recall agreeing to anything else.
    It's there. You agree to waive your rights using the website. When you go to the site to check if you were affected, there is terms of service section on the bottom. When you click on the terms of service, read section 4. 

    https://www.equifaxsecurity2017.com/potential-impact/
    I looked it over but I’m not seeing what you say exists. Can you not simply copy the sentence or paragraph that stated that says my rights are waived by simply “using the website” without even signing up for the service or agreeing to their terms of service? Can you also explain how “using the website” legally binds you to anything?
    It says this right at the top:

    What are the Terms of Use for Equifax?


    Below you will find our Product Terms of Use and the Site Terms of Use when using the Equifax website. You can also review our Privacy Policy, which provides information regarding our handling of any personal information that you may provide to us.

    On section 4, it says this:

    AGREEMENT TO RESOLVE ALL DISPUTES BY BINDING INDIVIDUAL ARBITRATION. PLEASE READ THIS ENTIRE SECTION CAREFULLY BECAUSE IT AFFECTS YOUR LEGAL RIGHTS BY REQUIRING ARBITRATION OF DISPUTES (EXCEPT AS SET FORTH BELOW) AND A WAIVER OF THE ABILITY TO BRING OR PARTICIPATE IN A CLASS ACTION, CLASS ARBITRATION, OR OTHER REPRESENTATIVE ACTION. ARBITRATION PROVIDES A QUICK AND COST EFFECTIVE MECHANISM FOR RESOLVING DISPUTES, BUT YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT IT ALSO LIMITS YOUR RIGHTS TO DISCOVERY AND APPEAL.

    I don't see how this would hold up in court if you are just simply checking to see if you were affected by the data breach. Signing up for the service, that could hold up in court. 
    Where does it say this? Why can’t you simply quote the sentence that says “using the website” protects them from being sued even without ever agreeing to their terms of service?
    It doesn't say that flat out but that's what it means reading the terms. You are agreeing to the terms of the website by using it. Terms of service on websites are enforceable. You technically don't have to agree to anything either. Legally enforcing the terms is another issue though. 
    Again, you still haven’t shown me any information that details what you claim. You said it’s posted at the top and posted something below which I can see nothing that claims I can’t use them for having even read the terms of agreement, since that’s located on their website.

    if this is so clear cut to you why can’t you detail any sentence that says I can’t sue them for “using the website”? What I read is that if I sign up for their service and agree to their terms that I also won’t be able to sue them.

    Look, this is a major hack and people should be concerned, and then you have the execs selling their stock days before which needs the SEC looking into it; and then terms of service saying that by getting the free credit check service for a year that you waive your right to sue, which is boiler plate yet still a dick move to include, but let's not add gasoline to this fire.
    edited September 2017
  • Reply 35 of 85
    That's not even possible. All you enter is a last name and partial SSN. If someone else checks your info there is no agreement to their terms. You'd have to sign up for their monitoring service.
    SolistompylongpathStrangeDays
  • Reply 36 of 85
    lkrupp said:
    Hopefully there will be a massive class action brought against Equifax. We should be compensated for the fear, uncertainty, and doubt this we will have to deal with. If our identities are stolen Equifax should be forced to fix it and compensate us even more. We're not dealing with some retailer who's data was hacked. This is one of the largest credit reporting agencies in the world and has data on us that no retailer would ever have. Equifax needs to pay dearly for its incompetence. The CEO can start off by resigning. Imagine the financial carnage this will cause. You want to buy a new car, or home, or iMac Pro, and your credit rating is in shambles.
    CEOs already started... by selling whole bunch of stock last month, that is, between the day they could have potentially known about the breach and before the day the breach was announced.. And, of course, that stock dump was not part of any investment plan... Yeah, just a coincidence, you know. Just three high level guys decided to dump a lot of shares for no reason.
    In addition to a class action suit, that also names those exec personally, they should be investigated for insider trading, as there is certainly probable cause to justify an investigation.
  • Reply 37 of 85
    Soli said:
    Soli said:
    Soli said:
    I'm not seeing that. I put in my surname, the last 6 of my SSN, and clicked the box to prove I'm not a robot. I don't recall agreeing to anything else.
    It's there. You agree to waive your rights using the website. When you go to the site to check if you were affected, there is terms of service section on the bottom. When you click on the terms of service, read section 4. 

    https://www.equifaxsecurity2017.com/potential-impact/
    I looked it over but I’m not seeing what you say exists. Can you not simply copy the sentence or paragraph that stated that says my rights are waived by simply “using the website” without even signing up for the service or agreeing to their terms of service? Can you also explain how “using the website” legally binds you to anything?
    It says this right at the top:

    What are the Terms of Use for Equifax?


    Below you will find our Product Terms of Use and the Site Terms of Use when using the Equifax website. You can also review our Privacy Policy, which provides information regarding our handling of any personal information that you may provide to us.

    On section 4, it says this:

    AGREEMENT TO RESOLVE ALL DISPUTES BY BINDING INDIVIDUAL ARBITRATION. PLEASE READ THIS ENTIRE SECTION CAREFULLY BECAUSE IT AFFECTS YOUR LEGAL RIGHTS BY REQUIRING ARBITRATION OF DISPUTES (EXCEPT AS SET FORTH BELOW) AND A WAIVER OF THE ABILITY TO BRING OR PARTICIPATE IN A CLASS ACTION, CLASS ARBITRATION, OR OTHER REPRESENTATIVE ACTION. ARBITRATION PROVIDES A QUICK AND COST EFFECTIVE MECHANISM FOR RESOLVING DISPUTES, BUT YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT IT ALSO LIMITS YOUR RIGHTS TO DISCOVERY AND APPEAL.

    I don't see how this would hold up in court if you are just simply checking to see if you were affected by the data breach. Signing up for the service, that could hold up in court. 
    Where does it say this? Why can’t you simply quote the sentence that says “using the website” protects them from being sued even without ever agreeing to their terms of service?
    It doesn't say that flat out but that's what it means reading the terms. You are agreeing to the terms of the website by using it. Terms of service on websites are enforceable. You technically don't have to agree to anything either. Legally enforcing the terms is another issue though. 
    Bro. That's to purchase their products.
    "THIS PRODUCT AGREEMENT AND TERMS OF USE ("AGREEMENT") CONTAINS THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS UPON WHICH YOU MAY PURCHASE AND USE OUR PRODUCTS THROUGH THE WWW.EQUIFAX.COM, WWW.IDENTITYPROTECTION.COM AND WWW.IDPROTECTION.COM WEBSITES AND ALL OTHER WEBSITES OWNED AND OPERATED BY EQUIFAX AND ITS AFFILIATES ("SITE"). YOU MUST ACCEPT THE TERMS OF THIS AGREEMENT, INCLUDING THE ARBITRATION AGREEMENT CONTAINED IN SECTION 4 BELOW, BEFORE YOU WILL BE PERMITTED TO REGISTER FOR AND PURCHASE ANY PRODUCT FROM THIS SITE. BY REGISTERING ON THIS SITE AND SUBMITTING YOUR ORDER, YOU ARE ACKNOWLEDGING ELECTRONIC RECEIPT OF, AND YOUR AGREEMENT TO BE BOUND BY, THIS AGREEMENT. YOU ALSO AGREE TO BE BOUND BY THIS AGREEMENT BY USING OR PAYING FOR OUR PRODUCTS OR TAKING OTHER ACTIONS THAT INDICATE ACCEPTANCE OF THIS AGREEMENT."

    If people are going to quote an agreement, they really should read the entire agreement. This above is the very first thing in their terms of use, in which you quote #4.

    edited September 2017 SolilongpathStrangeDays
  • Reply 38 of 85
    It sure did take them a while to disclose this info, probably more than enough time for he CEO to dump stock.
    longpathbaconstang
  • Reply 39 of 85
    mrboba1 said:
    Soli said:
    Soli said:
    Soli said:
    I'm not seeing that. I put in my surname, the last 6 of my SSN, and clicked the box to prove I'm not a robot. I don't recall agreeing to anything else.
    It's there. You agree to waive your rights using the website. When you go to the site to check if you were affected, there is terms of service section on the bottom. When you click on the terms of service, read section 4. 

    https://www.equifaxsecurity2017.com/potential-impact/
    I looked it over but I’m not seeing what you say exists. Can you not simply copy the sentence or paragraph that stated that says my rights are waived by simply “using the website” without even signing up for the service or agreeing to their terms of service? Can you also explain how “using the website” legally binds you to anything?
    It says this right at the top:

    What are the Terms of Use for Equifax?


    Below you will find our Product Terms of Use and the Site Terms of Use when using the Equifax website. You can also review our Privacy Policy, which provides information regarding our handling of any personal information that you may provide to us.

    On section 4, it says this:

    AGREEMENT TO RESOLVE ALL DISPUTES BY BINDING INDIVIDUAL ARBITRATION. PLEASE READ THIS ENTIRE SECTION CAREFULLY BECAUSE IT AFFECTS YOUR LEGAL RIGHTS BY REQUIRING ARBITRATION OF DISPUTES (EXCEPT AS SET FORTH BELOW) AND A WAIVER OF THE ABILITY TO BRING OR PARTICIPATE IN A CLASS ACTION, CLASS ARBITRATION, OR OTHER REPRESENTATIVE ACTION. ARBITRATION PROVIDES A QUICK AND COST EFFECTIVE MECHANISM FOR RESOLVING DISPUTES, BUT YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT IT ALSO LIMITS YOUR RIGHTS TO DISCOVERY AND APPEAL.

    I don't see how this would hold up in court if you are just simply checking to see if you were affected by the data breach. Signing up for the service, that could hold up in court. 
    Where does it say this? Why can’t you simply quote the sentence that says “using the website” protects them from being sued even without ever agreeing to their terms of service?
    It doesn't say that flat out but that's what it means reading the terms. You are agreeing to the terms of the website by using it. Terms of service on websites are enforceable. You technically don't have to agree to anything either. Legally enforcing the terms is another issue though. 
    Bro. That's to purchase their products.
    "THIS PRODUCT AGREEMENT AND TERMS OF USE ("AGREEMENT") CONTAINS THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS UPON WHICH YOU MAY PURCHASE AND USE OUR PRODUCTS THROUGH THE WWW.EQUIFAX.COM, WWW.IDENTITYPROTECTION.COM AND WWW.IDPROTECTION.COM WEBSITES AND ALL OTHER WEBSITES OWNED AND OPERATED BY EQUIFAX AND ITS AFFILIATES ("SITE"). YOU MUST ACCEPT THE TERMS OF THIS AGREEMENT, INCLUDING THE ARBITRATION AGREEMENT CONTAINED IN SECTION 4 BELOW, BEFORE YOU WILL BE PERMITTED TO REGISTER FOR AND PURCHASE ANY PRODUCT FROM THIS SITE. BY REGISTERING ON THIS SITE AND SUBMITTING YOUR ORDER, YOU ARE ACKNOWLEDGING ELECTRONIC RECEIPT OF, AND YOUR AGREEMENT TO BE BOUND BY, THIS AGREEMENT. YOU ALSO AGREE TO BE BOUND BY THIS AGREEMENT BY USING OR PAYING FOR OUR PRODUCTS OR TAKING OTHER ACTIONS THAT INDICATE ACCEPTANCE OF THIS AGREEMENT."

    If people are going to quote an agreement, they really should read the entire agreement. This above is the very first thing in their terms of use, in which you quote #4.

    I did read that. If you are looking to see if you were hacked, that means you are using their services, which the terms of service applies too. 
  • Reply 40 of 85
    I read a comment elsewhere that if you sign up for the 1-year monitoring, the fine print also says that you give up the right to sue Equifax! If true, that's scandalous! I hope Apple Insider investigates and reports back to us on that! In the meantime, just freeze your credit reports at each of the Big Three!
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