Microsoft brings Windows 10's Edge browser to Apple's iPhone in early preview form

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in iPhone
Microsoft on Thursday launched a preview version of its Edge Web browser for the iPhone, intended to let Windows 10 users move more seamlessly between desktop and mobile.

An Android version is also due soon.
An Android version is also due soon.


A key feature in this regard is "continue on PC," which much like Apple's Continuity (or Pushbullet) lets people push a webpage from the mobile version of Edge to the desktop. At the moment, PCs must be running the Windows 10 Fall Creator's Update Insider Preview.

The iPhone app also carries over Windows features like the Hub, Reading List, and Reading View, and will eventually sync both passwords and favorites between devices. The current preview is missing roaming passwords as well as iPad compatibility, and is moreover limited to English-speaking U.S. residents. Improved support is promised as the software develops, including tab sync as a longer-term goal.

Other built-in tools include a QR code reader, voice search, and a private browsing mode. Among search engine choices are Bing, Google, and Yahoo.

At present, there is no iPad version.

To try the iOS app, people must sign up with Microsoft's Windows Insider program, and then download it using Apple's TestFlight app. A finished release is due by the end of the year.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 24
    No thank you......
    emoelleranton zuykovmagman1979watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 24
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,823member
    Oh great...if its as shitty as the Edge browser in Windows 10 no thanks!
    magman1979boltsfan17RacerhomieXwatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 24
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,561member
    No really, I’m good…
    StrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 24
    Nope!
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 24
    JWSCJWSC Posts: 375member

    While I’ve never been a Microsoft fan, I see this as a good thing in that they are focusing on software tools for all platforms instead of tactically crippling software not on their preferred platforms as in prior years.  In theory it’s a win-win.

    But I suspect that the number of iPhone users who actually download the browser will be limited.  Certainly, I have zero intention of actually installing the thing.

    willcropointwatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 24
    kkqd1337kkqd1337 Posts: 191member
    i just downloaded it. it is actually pretty snappy and clean looking on iOS. And lets be serious, a Windows PC is much better than a MacBook, Windows 10 is solid.
  • Reply 7 of 24
    icoco3icoco3 Posts: 1,459member
    What's Edge??  /s
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 24
    RacerhomieXRacerhomieX Posts: 95unconfirmed, member
    kkqd1337 said:
    i just downloaded it. it is actually pretty snappy and clean looking on iOS. And lets be serious, a Windows PC is much better than a MacBook, Windows 10 is solid.
    Good Joke.
    StrangeDayswatto_cobraloopyfrogger
  • Reply 9 of 24
    JWSCJWSC Posts: 375member
    icoco3 said:
    What's Edge??  /s
    You know?  Bono, The Edge, U2.
  • Reply 10 of 24
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 7,285member
    kkqd1337 said:
    i just downloaded it. it is actually pretty snappy and clean looking on iOS. And lets be serious, a Windows PC is much better than a MacBook, Windows 10 is solid.
    Your check is in the mail.
    watto_cobraloopyfrogger
  • Reply 11 of 24
    I don't use Edge even on Windows 10.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 24
    kkqd1337 said:
    i just downloaded it. it is actually pretty snappy and clean looking on iOS. And lets be serious, a Windows PC is much better than a MacBook, Windows 10 is solid.
    I know you probably just posted this to incite people.  Be that as it may, in regards to Windows 10: Does it have a registry?  Does it still deal with Dll files?  Does it still scatter it's program installation files all over the hard drive like every version of windows built on DOS?  Until it gets rid of all these things it is anything but solid.  it's just pretty candy over a garbage heap. I'm glad you're using it and not me.
    edited October 2017 watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 24
    fallenjtfallenjt Posts: 3,976member
    Why would any iOS user want Edge instead of Safari? 
    edited October 2017 watto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 24
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,213moderator
    macxpress said:
    Oh great...if its as shitty as the Edge browser in Windows 10 no thanks!
    Browsers on iOS aren't allowed to use their own native engines, the ones that do native rendering use the Webkit that comes with the OS:

    https://developer.apple.com/app-store/review/guidelines/

    "Apps that browse the web must use the appropriate WebKit framework and WebKit Javascript."

    When they render pages, they should render exactly the same as Safari. It largely makes having 3rd party browsers on iOS pointless. The main differences are for syncing data with desktop browsers, different tab layouts etc. Some browsers circumvent this restriction by rendering content (even secure content) on their servers like Opera, which is a huge privacy concern:

    https://www.pcworld.com/article/194148/security_concerns_with_opera_mini_browser_for_iphone.html
    http://www.opera.com/privacy/mini

    "
    We log the URLs of your requests that are sent through our servers, but not the content. We also log your IP address, details about your device's make and model, and a randomly generated identifier associated with your instance of our products. We use this data to debug and improve our services and may store our server logs for up to six months. We anonymize and aggregate this data and may allow our business partners access to it. We and our business partners cannot link aggregated data to individual people."

    On Android, Edge is using Blink:

    https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/10/05/microsoft_edge_ios_android_beta/

    The Edge engine EdgeHTML on Windows is based off Trident, the engine from IE but with the old junk taken out and new modern junk thrown in.

    Use Safari on iOS, use Safari on Mac, use Chrome on Windows (when you have to use Windows, but mostly avoid Windows and Chrome when possible).
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 24
    The only reason I can think of that might compel me to use the Edge browser is if it would allow me to access Sharepoint content
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 24
    chasmchasm Posts: 1,393member
    I'm amused by the trolls that claim it's faster than Safari. Um, you know that Apple does not allow third-party browsers to use anything but MobileSafari's underlying tech, right? IOW, every third party browser on iOS -- every single one -- is Safari with a facelift and whatever Safari features (or compatible other features) the developer chose to incorporate.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 24
    freerangefreerange Posts: 1,586member
    kkqd1337 said:
    i just downloaded it. it is actually pretty snappy and clean looking on iOS. And lets be serious, a Windows PC is much better than a MacBook, Windows 10 is solid.
    ROFLMAO!!! 
  • Reply 18 of 24
    webraider said:
    [...] in regards to Windows 10: Does it have a registry?  Does it still deal with Dll files?  Does it still scatter it's program installation files all over the hard drive like every version of windows built on DOS?  Until it gets rid of all these things it is anything but solid.  it's just pretty candy over a garbage heap.
    I've noticed that uninstall instructions for Mac apps always just say "Drag the app to the trash" but a search that reveals invisible and system files always turns up several related files scattered around the system drive.

    Isnt the Mac approach of storing various supporting files in the Library and other folders similar to what Windows does?

    Serious question. I have no idea how this stuff works.
  • Reply 19 of 24
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 30,994member
    icoco3 said:
    What's Edge??  /s
    U2's guitarist.
  • Reply 20 of 24
    I've noticed that uninstall instructions for Mac apps always just say "Drag the app to the trash" but a search that reveals invisible and system files always turns up several related files scattered around the system drive.

    Isnt the Mac approach of storing various supporting files in the Library and other folders similar to what Windows does?

    Not exactly, and I'll explain why

     Most of the time the files that a program installs or creates on a Mac are either text files that the application uses to record things like your registration ID or preferences as to how you want to customize the app.  These are negligible.. If you delete them, the app will simply recreate these again next time you re-launch. If you leave them after you delete the app it's never an issue because it has no impact on your system or other programs.    

    Some files that Application can install could be font files (Like Microsoft will install ithe system).. If you uninstall the program by dragging it to the trash those will remain on your system that's correct..  It's very easy to manage your fonts on the Mac because there is an application called font book, but you can also go to the font's folder.  

    Here's the thing though,  these are files (Preferences, fonts etc..) that the program does not need to run.. Windows hierarchy although it has been tweaked and is a changing system.. still requires a registry, still relies on file extensions, and will put files that a program needs to run in one directory and in another directory. etc..

    This Is why windows must rely on a registry to associate where all those program files (and supporting files) are.  If I change something, or install a program that is not properly prepared, it can disrupt the registry and I run the risk of having a computer that's not useable. (Also like messing with .dll files)

    On the Mac all pertinent files needed for that application to run are self contained in the Icon that represents the program.   This icon is actually a folder but I can move it to whatever directly I want.  the Desktop, the Trash, the documents folder.  It will still run.  I can re-title It and it will still run.  Of course you can create short cuts as well.

    Last but not least there are 'Extension Type files" that an application can install that modify behavior of the Mac of allow a program to have access to other systems.  An example of this wold be Antivirus software.  These programs usually do include an Un-install feature because they do put some files other directories.  Out of all the program installations mentioned this would appear to be the most windows like.  There aren't many programs that do this, and it is a simple matter of dragging the program to the trash, and removing the extension (which the un-installer will do for you).  Again.. if you remove the extension only, the program will either re-install the extension, or ask you to run the installer again, but no other programs on the Mac will be effected (or the operating system).  If you remove the program, but leave the extension, the effect is negligible. 

    So yes.. there are  programs that do install some files in other places, but changing, moving, deleting those files doesn't effect the operating system, and moving the actual program to another directory (Or renaming it) doesn't affect the program.  Most of the time it really is as simple as dragging the program to the trash.  Otherwise, run the uninstall program.  Don't worry about the preference files as they are text documents and take up very little room.

    edited October 2017 lorin schultz
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