18-core iMac Pro starts at $7,399, ships in 6-8 weeks, can be maxed out for $13,199

2»

Comments

  • Reply 21 of 40
    eightzero said:
    dewme said:
    I don't have the historical numbers ... but I suspect that if you compare the inflation-adjusted cost of these iMac Pro workstations to earlier generation Sun, Silicon Graphics (SGI), HP, etc., workstations and factor in the price/performance of the iMac Pro computers these Macs are an incredible value for people who really need the capabilities and performance that these puppies deliver.   
    Or the $10,000 Mac IIfx.
    Or the $10,000 Apple Lisa in 1983. 

  • Reply 22 of 40
    appexappex Posts: 687member
    No to soldered not upgradable parts by user and programmed obsolescence. All-in-one (AIO) computers like iMac are a huge aggression to planet Earth. Computers may last for seven years or less, whereas displays may last for more than 20 years. I am using an Apple Cinema Display 22-inch purchased almost 18 years ago and it works great. And it has been on an average of 15 hours a day, 356 days each year.
    netrox
  • Reply 23 of 40
    Anyone know how much third party memory of this type is? Am curious how much we are ripped off by having to get it from Apple. I really hate having to come up with these stupendous sums up front instead of upgrading RAM as I decide I need it.
    Crucial:

    8GB DDR4-2666 ECC RDIMM for Mac (currently labeled "New") = $114.99 each
    32GB DDR4 2666 ECC RDIMM for Mac (currently labeled "New") = $430.99 each

    I assume these are for the iMac Pro. What else could they be for?

    So 128GB (4x32GB) via Crucial will cost you $1724. Apple charges $2400 for that upgrade. So the real-world premium for 128GB Apple iMac Pro RAM is $676.

    Of course, that doesn't account for what you could get for the stock RAM (assuming 4x8GB) you would have leftover after a DIY upgrade...
    edited December 2017
  • Reply 24 of 40
    chiachia Posts: 710member
    appex said:
    No to soldered not upgradable parts by user and programmed obsolescence. All-in-one (AIO) computers like iMac are a huge aggression ...
    Seems you have your own huge aggression against AppleInsider forums and editorial staff despite being warned.

    Hasta la Vista baby whilst you’re kicked outside.


    radarthekatwatto_cobra
  • Reply 25 of 40
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 3,395member
    That's a lot of money for a disposable computer. I'll be curious to see the real world usage numbers, specifically in how much it throttles as the temperature increases from heavy use...
  • Reply 26 of 40
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,028member
    dysamoria said:
    That's a lot of money for a disposable computer. I'll be curious to see the real world usage numbers, specifically in how much it throttles as the temperature increases from heavy use…
    1) It's disposable like a styrofoam cup that you use once or it's disposable because it's a computer that has a general lifespan before it makes sense to replace with a newer model? If you mean because it's not user-upgradable, that's both a poor argument and not the definition of disposable.

    2) What does it matter how much it costs if the machine is used to make money? If you can make $100/hr with your current rig due to limitations in processing speeds, and you can make $200 with an iMac Pro, then it would take you about 50 hours to pay off the base machine. If that scenario fit your usage needs then you'd be fiscally irresponsible not to upgrade.
    radarthekatwatto_cobra
  • Reply 27 of 40
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 6,191administrator
    Soli said:
    dysamoria said:
    That's a lot of money for a disposable computer. I'll be curious to see the real world usage numbers, specifically in how much it throttles as the temperature increases from heavy use…
    1) It's disposable like a styrofoam cup that you use once or it's disposable because it's a computer that has a general lifespan before it makes sense to replace with a newer model? If you mean because it's not user-upgradable, that's both a poor argument and not the definition of disposable.

    2) What does it matter how much it costs if the machine is used to make money? If you can make $100/hr with your current rig due to limitations in processing speeds, and you can make $200 with an iMac Pro, then it would take you about 50 hours to pay off the base machine. If that scenario fit your usage needs then you'd be fiscally irresponsible not to upgrade.
    Here's the thing. It is upgradeable.

    The Mac Pro slab-side was never intended to have processor upgrades. Yet, here we are. Neither was the pre-G3, the G3, or the G4 towers. We did it anyway. The core (solo) Mac mini? That too. 

    The iMac Pro has socketed RAM and a socketed processor. Yeah, you've got to pull the screen off to get to them, but it's doable.

    The people who are in the subset of people that don't use their computers as appliances and will upgrade components, are the same ones who aren't deterred by a screen removal.
    edited December 2017 Soliradarthekatchia
  • Reply 28 of 40
    Does anyone else find it odd that Apple Care on these ultra expensive Macs is still only $169.00?
  • Reply 29 of 40
    thedbathedba Posts: 651member
    appex said:
    No to soldered not upgradable parts by user and programmed obsolescence. All-in-one (AIO) computers like iMac are a huge aggression to planet Earth. Computers may last for seven years or less, whereas displays may last for more than 20 years. I am using an Apple Cinema Display 22-inch purchased almost 18 years ago and it works great. And it has been on an average of 15 hours a day, 356 days each year.
    Oh please stop with this planned obsolescence nonsense. You yourself says that your computer may last 7 years and for many, they keep them even longer.
    Also as far as your keeping your monitor for 20 years, do you actually know what people were using in 1997?  Answer: CRT monitors. I hardly doubt that anyone in Europe or North America was using anything other than LCD's by 2010. 
    watto_cobrachia
  • Reply 30 of 40
    VRingVRing Posts: 108member
    Soli said:
    dysamoria said:
    That's a lot of money for a disposable computer. I'll be curious to see the real world usage numbers, specifically in how much it throttles as the temperature increases from heavy use…
    1) It's disposable like a styrofoam cup that you use once or it's disposable because it's a computer that has a general lifespan before it makes sense to replace with a newer model? If you mean because it's not user-upgradable, that's both a poor argument and not the definition of disposable.

    2) What does it matter how much it costs if the machine is used to make money? If you can make $100/hr with your current rig due to limitations in processing speeds, and you can make $200 with an iMac Pro, then it would take you about 50 hours to pay off the base machine. If that scenario fit your usage needs then you'd be fiscally irresponsible not to upgrade.
    Here's the thing. It is upgradeable.

    The Mac Pro slab-side was never intended to have processor upgrades. Yet, here we are. Neither was the pre-G3, the G3, or the G4 towers. We did it anyway. The core (solo) Mac mini? That too. 

    The iMac Pro has socketed RAM and a socketed processor. Yeah, you've got to pull the screen off to get to them, but it's doable.

    The people who are in the subset of people that don't use their computers as appliances and will upgrade components, are the same ones who aren't deterred by a screen removal.
    In terms of the processor, I'm not sure if you'd be able to easily upgrade. For example, in the 10 core variant, Apple looks to be using an underclocked version of the W-2155. The traditional W-2155 has a base clock of 3.3 GHz, while Apple has theirs at 3.0 GHz. From what I've read, Apple might be using a variant called the W-2150B. I don't know if the regular W-2145 (8 core), W-2155 (10 core), W-2175 (14 core), W-2195 (18 core) models can simply be swapped into place.
    edited December 2017
  • Reply 31 of 40
    eightzero said:
    How long before one shows up on Kim Jong-un's desk? 
    As soon as Dennis Rodman can deliver it gift wrapped in person.
  • Reply 32 of 40
    appex said:
    No to soldered not upgradable parts by user and programmed obsolescence. All-in-one (AIO) computers like iMac are a huge aggression to planet Earth. Computers may last for seven years or less, whereas displays may last for more than 20 years. I am using an Apple Cinema Display 22-inch purchased almost 18 years ago and it works great. And it has been on an average of 15 hours a day, 356 days each year.
    Seriously, with the all-in-one crap Dell and HP put out and that they can't give away you're going to complain that Apple is getting 7 to 10 years on a computer. 
    People are throwing this HP out as soon as they buy it because it's slower than the computer they are replacing.

    https://www.walmart.com/ip/HP-20-c013w-Snow-White-All-in-One-PC-with-19-5-HD-Display-Intel-Celeron-J3060-Processor-4GB-Memory-500GB-Hard-Drive-and-Windows-10-Home/

    edited December 2017 watto_cobra
  • Reply 33 of 40
    Anyone know how much third party memory of this type is? Am curious how much we are ripped off by having to get it from Apple. I really hate having to come up with these stupendous sums up front instead of upgrading RAM as I decide I need it.
    Are you actually planning on buying one of these iMac Pros? If not, how are you being ripped off?

    Anyway, I imagine service centers could disassemble and install the RAM modules later, they are socketed.
    I would like to buy one, yes. My previous iMac is about three years old and I think it’s time for an upgrade. My old one was about $4k so $5k isn’t that much of an increase for all the cool improvements it has. I want to see smooth performance from complex Motion projects, which sometimes stutters and I am thinking this might be just the ticket. But I’m a little concerned about the options cost, and wondering how much machine I really need for my work. Then10-core 128gb version Apple sent to everyone is really pricey. By the way do they include that cool Pelican case it was packed in that some of the demo recipients got?  I would love that since I’d like to travel with my machine. 
  • Reply 34 of 40
    Just curious. Don't Apps need to be optimized to take advantage of such a high number of Cores? What are the "Professional" programs that can?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 35 of 40
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,028member
    apmiller said:
    Just curious. Don't Apps need to be optimized to take advantage of such a high number of Cores? What are the "Professional" programs that can?
    Freecell and Calculator. That's it.
    apmiller
  • Reply 36 of 40
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 6,191administrator
    VRing said:
    Soli said:
    dysamoria said:
    That's a lot of money for a disposable computer. I'll be curious to see the real world usage numbers, specifically in how much it throttles as the temperature increases from heavy use…
    1) It's disposable like a styrofoam cup that you use once or it's disposable because it's a computer that has a general lifespan before it makes sense to replace with a newer model? If you mean because it's not user-upgradable, that's both a poor argument and not the definition of disposable.

    2) What does it matter how much it costs if the machine is used to make money? If you can make $100/hr with your current rig due to limitations in processing speeds, and you can make $200 with an iMac Pro, then it would take you about 50 hours to pay off the base machine. If that scenario fit your usage needs then you'd be fiscally irresponsible not to upgrade.
    Here's the thing. It is upgradeable.

    The Mac Pro slab-side was never intended to have processor upgrades. Yet, here we are. Neither was the pre-G3, the G3, or the G4 towers. We did it anyway. The core (solo) Mac mini? That too. 

    The iMac Pro has socketed RAM and a socketed processor. Yeah, you've got to pull the screen off to get to them, but it's doable.

    The people who are in the subset of people that don't use their computers as appliances and will upgrade components, are the same ones who aren't deterred by a screen removal.
    In terms of the processor, I'm not sure if you'd be able to easily upgrade. For example, in the 10 core variant, Apple looks to be using an underclocked version of the W-2155. The traditional W-2155 has a base clock of 3.3 GHz, while Apple has theirs at 3.0 GHz. From what I've read, Apple might be using a variant called the W-2150B. I don't know if the regular W-2145 (8 core), W-2155 (10 core), W-2175 (14 core), W-2195 (18 core) models can simply be swapped into place.
    More to the point, it's not soldered in. The CPU expansion possibilities of the slab-side Mac Pro weren't fully blasted open until 2013-2014, so wondering about an easy upgrade today probably isn't that productive.
    chia
  • Reply 37 of 40

    Thanks, Appex, for spouting the same bullshit and getting the ban hammer! I knew I had asked you nicely to do it again!!


    Maybe I should buy the tricked out model and attribute it to mid-life crisis.

    watto_cobra
  • Reply 38 of 40
    loopless said:
    rob53 said:
    Maybe you need to look at your data workload and see if a change in program will allow you to use more GPU computing power. Most of the supercomputers are using GPU processing anyway so I'd look into your workflow and see what can be changed.
     
    Wrong. Many algorithms are not suited to GPU computing. GPUs are not the be all and end all for HPC. Most HPC clusters are vanilla Linux box’s without GPUs. 
    Well maybe traditionally, but AI algos on neural networking mostly need the GPU so I guess things change over time...
  • Reply 39 of 40
    Anyone know how much third party memory of this type is? Am curious how much we are ripped off by having to get it from Apple. I really hate having to come up with these stupendous sums up front instead of upgrading RAM as I decide I need it.
    Crucial:

    8GB DDR4-2666 ECC RDIMM for Mac (currently labeled "New") = $114.99 each
    32GB DDR4 2666 ECC RDIMM for Mac (currently labeled "New") = $430.99 each

    I assume these are for the iMac Pro. What else could they be for?

    So 128GB (4x32GB) via Crucial will cost you $1724. Apple charges $2400 for that upgrade. So the real-world premium for 128GB Apple iMac Pro RAM is $676.

    Of course, that doesn't account for what you could get for the stock RAM (assuming 4x8GB) you would have leftover after a DIY upgrade...
    Many manufacturers take quite a lot of making sure that parts just work. A good example is SFP-fiber modules. Cisco and Juniper charge 700$ for a "certified"  module made by the same manufacturer that sells the OEM part for 70$. They still will probably work the same, but atleast it isnt fixed so you can not chose...
  • Reply 40 of 40
    pffft iMac Pro what!? Vega grafix instead of nvidea! OMG, the price on this Mac Is reee-diculous. You can get the exact same config in a GateWay computer, for just $299 just search it. Yep. :)
    edited December 2017
Sign In or Register to comment.